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Davis, Paul A.
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Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Appleby, R., Davis, L., Davis, P. A. & Gustafsson, H. (2018). Examining perceptions of teammates’ burnout and training hours in athlete burnout. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 12(3), 316-332
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining perceptions of teammates’ burnout and training hours in athlete burnout
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 316-332Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perceptions of teammates and training load have been shown to influence athletes' physical and psychological health; however, limited research has investigated these factors in relation to burnout. Athletes (N = 140) from a variety of competitive team sports, ranging in level from regional to professional, completed questionnaires measuring individual burnout, perceptions of teammates' burnout, and training hours perweek on two occasions separated by threemonths. After controlling for burnout at time one, training hours were associated with athletes' burnout and perceptions of teammates' burnout at time two. Multilevel modeling indicated actual team burnout (i.e., the average burnout score of the individual athletes in a team) and perceived team burnout were associated with individual's own burnout. The findings highlight that burnout is dynamic and relates to physiological stressors associated with training and psychological perceptions of teammates' burnout. Future research directions exploring potential social influences on athlete burnout are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
Keywords
exhaustion, global burnout, team sports, teammates, training load
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144442 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2017-0037 (DOI)000444270200003 ()
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Davis, P. A., Davis, L., Wills, S., Appleby, R. & Nieuwenhuys, A. (2018). Exploring "Sledging" and Interpersonal Emotion-Regulation Strategies in Professional Cricket. The Sport psychologist, 32(2), 136-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring "Sledging" and Interpersonal Emotion-Regulation Strategies in Professional Cricket
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2018 (English)In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study examines cricketers’ perceptions of emotional interactions between competitors. Semistructured interviews with 12 male professional cricketers explored experiences (i.e., emotions, cognitions, behaviors) relating to incidents during competition where they or an opponent attempted to evoke an emotional reaction (e.g., sledging). Cricketers described their use of sledging as aggressive actions and verbal interactions with the aim of disrupting concentration and altering the emotional states of opponents. They described experiencing a variety of emotions (e.g., anxiety, anger) in response to opponents’ attempts at interpersonal emotion regulation; linguistic analyses indicated that both positive than negative emotions were experienced. A range of strategies in response to competitors’ deliberate attempts at interpersonal emotion regulation were outlined. The present study extends previous research investigating interpersonal emotion regulation within teams by indicating that professional cricketers are aware of the impact of cognitions and emotions on performance and attempt to negatively influence these factors in competitors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics Publishers, 2018
Keywords
coping, qualitative, aggression, elite
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145302 (URN)10.1123/tsp.2017-0078 (DOI)000436980000006 ()2-s2.0-8504916859 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Börjesson, M., Lundqvist, C., Gustafsson, H. & Davis, P. A. (2018). Flotation REST as a Stress Reduction Method: The Effects on Anxiety, Muscle Tension, and Performance. Journal of clinical sport psychology, 12(3), 333-346
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flotation REST as a Stress Reduction Method: The Effects on Anxiety, Muscle Tension, and Performance
2018 (English)In: Journal of clinical sport psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 333-346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of flotation REST upon skilled and less skilled golfers' anxiety in terms of physiological indicators of stress, self-rated anxiety scores, muscle tension, and the effect on golf putting. Prior to performing the putting task participants underwent a treatment of flotation REST or a period of resting in an armchair. Participants completed both treatments in a randomized order with a two-week interval. The results showed that both flotation REST and the armchair treatment reduced systolic blood pressure and heart rate, with no differences between treatments or athlete skill levels. No significant differences between treatments were revealed regarding self-ratings, level of muscle tension or putting precision. The results indicate that flotation REST may be useful for reducing negative symptoms related to stress and anxiety in general; however, no support for direct positive effects on golf performance were found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
Keywords
cognitive anxiety, electromyography, flotation REST, golf putting, somatic anxiety
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152259 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2017-0032 (DOI)000444270200004 ()
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Davis, L., Appleby, R., Davis, P., Wetherell, M. & Gustafsson, H. (2018). The role of coach-athlete relationship quality in team sport athletes’ psychophysiological exhaustion: implications for physical and cognitive performance. Journal of Sports Sciences, 36(17), 1985-1992
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of coach-athlete relationship quality in team sport athletes’ psychophysiological exhaustion: implications for physical and cognitive performance
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 36, no 17, p. 1985-1992Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to examine associations between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and athlete exhaustion by assessing physiological and cognitive consequences. Male and female athletes (N = 82) representing seven teams across four different sports, participated in a quasi-experi- mental study measuring physical performance on a 5-meter multiple shuttle test, followed by a Stroop test to assess cognitive performance. Participants provided saliva samples measuring cortisol as a biomarker of acute stress response and completed questionnaires measuring exhaustion, and coach- athlete relationship quality. Structural equation modelling revealed a positive relationship between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and Stroop performance, and negative relationships between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and cortisol responses to high-intensity exercise, cognitive testing, and exhaustion. The study supports previous research on socio-cognitive correlates of athlete exhaustion by highlighting associations with the quality of the coach-athlete relationship. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Coach-athlete relationship, exhaustion, team sports, teammate, performance
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144441 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2018.1429176 (DOI)000432728100010 ()29359646 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, E., Gustafsson, H., Davis, P. A., Holmström, S., Lemyre, N. & Ivarsson, A. (2018). The temporal relations across burnout dimensions in athletes. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 28(3), 1215-1226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The temporal relations across burnout dimensions in athletes
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1215-1226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Burnout is a construct that has garnered considerable attention in sport psychology within recent years. Several hypothesized models regarding how the three dimensions (exhaustion, devaluation, and reduced sense of accomplishment) temporally relate to each other have been advanced. One proposal outlined by Maslach and Leiter suggests that exhaustion predicts devaluation which predicts reduced sense of accomplishment. However, there is no consensus among researchers as it has been argued that exhaustion predicts devaluation and reduced accomplishment separately. The aim of this study was to test multiple alternative hypotheses regarding the relationships of the burnout dimensions in athletes. Two samples of Swedish youth elite athletes with differing time spans between measurements were used. Specifically, one sample involved time-intensive measures collected every week over an eight-week period, and the other sample included four measurement points across an 18-month period. Results showed that none of the previously proposed models outlining the temporal relations of burnout dimensions were supported. Statistical analysis of the models including the cross-lagged predictions of dimensions did not have any statistically significant impact except when exhaustion negatively predicted devaluation between time 1 (month 0) and time 2 (month 6) in the 18-month sample; this relation faded in the following time points. Further, issues regarding the stability of devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment emerged as their autocorrelation were very weak in the time-intensive sample. These findings raise a number of points for further theoretical and practical discussions about the athlete burnout construct.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
athlete burnout, athlete stress, burnout, causality, multivariate latent curve model with structured residuals
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146161 (URN)10.1111/sms.13000 (DOI)000426529300049 ()29087026 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Davis, P. A. (2016). Current perspectives on psychological aspects associated with the development, and practice of effective coaching and management. In: Davis, Paul A. (Ed.), The psychology of effective coaching and management: (pp. 1-12). New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Current perspectives on psychological aspects associated with the development, and practice of effective coaching and management
2016 (English)In: The psychology of effective coaching and management / [ed] Davis, Paul A., New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129462 (URN)978-1-63483-787-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Allan, V., Turnnidge, J., Vierimaa, M., Davis, P. A. & Côté, J. (2016). Development of the Assessment of Coach Emotions systematic observation instrument: A tool to evaluate coaches’ emotions in the youth sport context. International journal of sports science & coaching, 11(6), 859-871
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of the Assessment of Coach Emotions systematic observation instrument: A tool to evaluate coaches’ emotions in the youth sport context
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2016 (English)In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 859-871Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current research on emotions in sport focuses heavily on athletes’ intrapersonal emotion regulation; however, interpersonal consequences of emotion regulation are garnering recent attention. As leaders in sport, coaches have the opportunity to regulate not only their own emotions, but also those of athletes, officials, and spectators. As such, the present study set out to develop an observational tool, demonstrating evidence of validity and reliability, for measuring coaches’ overt emotions in the youth sport context. Categories were derived and refined through extensive literature and video review, resulting in 12 categories of behavioural content and eight emotion modifiers (NeutralHappyAffectionateAlertTenseAnxiousAngry and Disappointed). The final coding system is presented herein, complete with supporting evidence for validity and reliability. As a tool for both researchers and practitioners in sport, the Assessment of Coach Emotions (ACE) offers enhanced insight into the contextual qualities underlying coaches’ interactive behaviours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Anxiety, affect, anger, coach-athlete interactions, communication, emotional regulation, hedonic tone
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129470 (URN)10.1177/1747954116676113 (DOI)000391792000012 ()
Available from: 2016-12-30 Created: 2016-12-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Davis, P. A. & Davis, L. (2016). Emotions and emotion regulation in coaching. In: Paul A. Davis (Ed.), The psychology of effective coaching and management: (pp. 285-306). New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotions and emotion regulation in coaching
2016 (English)In: The psychology of effective coaching and management / [ed] Paul A. Davis, New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016, p. 285-306Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129468 (URN)978-1-63483-787-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-30 Created: 2016-12-30 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Hickey, A., Newham, J., Slawinska, M., Kwasnicka, D., McDonald, S., Del Din, S., . . . Godfrey, A. (2016). Estimating cut points: a simple method for new wearables. Maturitas, 83, 78-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating cut points: a simple method for new wearables
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2016 (English)In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 83, p. 78-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wearable technology is readily available for continuous assessment due to a growing number of commercial devices with increased data capture capabilities. However, many commercial devices fail to support suitable parameters (cut points) derived from the literature to help quantify physical activity (PA) due to differences in manufacturing. A simple metric to estimate cut points for new wearables is needed to aid data analysis.

Objective

The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate a simple methodology to determine cut points based on ratios between sedentary behaviour (SB) and PA intensities for a new wrist worn device (PRO-Diary™) by comparing its output to a validated and well characterised ‘gold standard’ (ActiGraph™).

Study design

Twelve participants completed a semi-structured (four-phase) treadmill protocol encompassing SB and three PA intensity levels (light, moderate, vigorous). The outputs of the devices were compared accounting for relative intensity.

Results

Count ratios (6.31, 7.68, 4.63, 3.96) were calculated to successfully determine cut-points for the new wrist worn wearable technology during SB (0–426) as well as light (427–803), moderate (804–2085) and vigorous (≥2086) activities, respectively.

Conclusion

Our findings should be utilised as a primary reference for investigations seeking to use new (wrist worn) wearable technology similar to that used here (i.e., PRO-Diary™) for the purposes of quantifying SB and PA intensities. The utility of count ratios may be useful in comparing devices or SB/PA values estimated across different studies. However, a more robust examination is required for different devices, attachment locations and on larger/diverse cohorts.

Keywords
Cut points, Sedentary behaviour, Physical activity, Accelerometer
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129474 (URN)10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.10.003 (DOI)000366783800014 ()26490294 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-30 Created: 2016-12-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Davis, P. A. (Ed.). (2016). The psychology of effective coaching and management. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The psychology of effective coaching and management
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Psychology of Effective Coaching and Management is a valuable resource for students, researchers, practitioners, educators, and administrators that want to increase their knowledge of psychological aspects associated with the development and practice of coaching and management. The reader is guided through models of the coaching process, approaches to coach learning, context specific education, and tools for observing coaching behaviors. Additionally, considerations for enhancing positive youth development, motivational climate, group dynamics, self-regulation, emotions, and mental toughness are outlined. The application of mental skills such as self-talk, the consideration of an athlete’s personality in coaching practice, and leadership theories in management are also reviewed. Examples of highly effective sport organizations and approaches to optimizing relationships with support staff are presented, as well as research and implications of coach burnout. The book is written by world leading scholars, sport psychologists, coaches, and managers from the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Spain, Greece, Croatia and the UK. Each chapter presents current research and offers suggestions for optimizing effective coaching and management. The chapters are written to be accessible to a wide range of readers, and each chapter offers a set of key considerations for enhancing practice. The aim of the book is to present up-to-date knowledge of the theories and research undertaken in sport coaching and management, with a particular focus upon applying understanding to maximize effective practice. This book will serve as essential reading for scholars and students; it can be used as a key text in sports coaching or coach education programs. Furthermore, coaches as well as their athletes will benefit from the recommendations for practice presented in the book.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016. p. 444
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129460 (URN)978-1-63483-787-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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