umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eriksson, Linda
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Eriksson, L., Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries. Nutrients, 11(7), Article ID 1491.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taste and diet preferences are complex and influenced by both environmental and host traits while affecting both food selection and associated health outcomes. The present study genotyped 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in previously reported taste and food intake related genes and assessed associations with taste threshold (TT) and preferred intensity (PT) of sweet, sour and bitter, food preferences, habitual diet intake, and caries status in healthy young Swedish men and women (n = 127). Polymorphisms in the GNAT3, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes were associated with variation in TT and PT for sweet taste as well as sweet food intake. Increasing PT for sweet was associated with increasing preference and intake of sugary foods. Similarly, increasing TT for sour was associated with increasing intake of sour foods, whereas the associations between food preference/intake and TT/PT for bitter was weak in this study group. Finally, allelic variation in the GNAT3, SLC2A2, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes was associated with caries status, whereas TT, PT and food preferences were not. It was concluded that variations in taste receptor, glucose transporter and gustducin encoding genes are related to taste perception, food preference and intake as well as the sugar-dependent caries disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
taste perception, taste preference, taste genes, diet preference, diet selection, caries
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162681 (URN)10.3390/nu11071491 (DOI)000478885400090 ()31261961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Lif Holgerson, P., Esberg, A. & Johansson, I. (2018). Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans. Journal of Dental Research, 97(3), 275-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans
2018 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus mutans is a key bacterial species in the caries process, which affects >90% of the population worldwide. However, other acidogenic and aciduric/acidophilic species may contribute to disease development. In Sweden, a country with low prevalences of caries and S. mutans, a significant portion of caries-affected adolescents lack detectable levels of S. mutans. The objectives of the present study were 1) to characterize the tooth biofilm and saliva microbiota of adolescents with caries disease, with or without detectable S. mutans, from tooth biofilm and saliva samples and 2) to assess taxa clustering in the tooth biofilm and saliva samples and relate this information to caries status. For 17-y-old participants ( N = 154), enamel and dentin caries (the total number of present carious surfaces in the enamel and dentin) and caries experience (the number of decayed and filled tooth surfaces) were recorded, dental biofilm and saliva samples obtained, and information on medical and lifestyle habits collected. Multiplex 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing of bacterial DNA was performed with the Illumina MiSeq platform. The Human Oral Microbiome Database and the ProbeSeq pipeline were used in the HOMI NGS procedure. In subjects with caries experience, high levels of S. mutans were associated with a few species and low levels with a panel of saccharolytic species. Present caries was similarly associated with a panel of saccharolytic species in subjects without S. mutans. Furthermore, tooth biofilm microbiota could be used to establish 4 clusters of subjects with different caries experiences. In particular, high levels of S. mutans were associated with the presence of a few influential species in multivariate modeling, including Scardovia wiggsiae. By contrast, a panel of less avid lactic acid-producing species was influential in patients with undetectable or low S. mutans levels in such modeling. These findings support a prominent role of S. mutans in infected adolescents but also the ecologic concept, especially in S. mutans-free subjects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand oaks: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
microbiota, saliva, tooth biofilm, adolescents, 16S, high-throughput nucleotide sequencing
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139760 (URN)10.1177/0022034517731758 (DOI)000429319800005 ()28930642 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Eriksson, L., Haworth, S. & Lif Holgerson, P. (2018). Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition. PLoS ONE, 13(3), Article ID e0193504.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition
Show others...
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bovine milk intake has been associated with various disease outcomes, with modulation of the gastro-intestinal microbiome being suggested as one potential mechanism. The aim of the present study was to explore the oral microbiota in relation to variation in self-reported milk intake. Saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota was characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and cultivation in 154 Swedish adolescents, and information on diet and other lifestyle markers were obtained from a questionnaire, and dental caries from clinical examination. A replication cohort of 31,571 adults with similar information on diet intake, other lifestyle markers and caries was also studied. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) modelling separated adolescents with low milk intake (lowest tertile with <0.4 servings/day) apart from those with high intake of milk (≥3.7 servings/day) based on saliva and tooth biofilm, respectively. Taxa in several genera contributed to this separation, and milk intake was inversely associated with the caries causing Streptococcus mutans in saliva and tooth biofilm samples by sequencing, PCR and cultivation. Despite the difference in S. mutans colonization, caries prevalence did not differ between milk consumption groups in the adolescents or the adults in the replication cohort, which may reflect that a significant positive association between intake of milk and sweet products was present in both the study and replication group. It was concluded that high milk intake correlates with different oral microbiota and it is hypothesized that milk may confer similar effects in the gut. The study also illustrated that reduction of one single disease associated bacterial species, such as S. mutans by milk intake, may modulate but not prevent development of complex diseases, such as caries, due to adverse effects from other causal factors, such as sugar intake in the present study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Fransisco: Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018
Keywords
saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, dairy products, streptococcus mutans, dental caries, cardiovascular disease, lactase persistence, in vitro, health, cancer, mortality
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146286 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0193504 (DOI)000427931600019 ()29561863 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Holgerson, P. L. & Johansson, I. (2017). Saliva and tooth biofilm bacterial microbiota in adolescents in a low caries community. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 5861.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Saliva and tooth biofilm bacterial microbiota in adolescents in a low caries community
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 5861Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oral cavity harbours a complex microbiome that is linked to dental diseases and serves as a route to other parts of the body. Here, the aims were to characterize the oral microbiota by deep sequencing in a low-caries population with regular dental care since childhood and search for association with caries prevalence and incidence. Saliva and tooth biofilm from 17-year-olds and mock bacteria communities were analysed using 16S rDNA Illumina MiSeq (v3-v4) and PacBio SMRT (v1-v8) sequencing including validity and reliability estimates. Caries was scored at 17 and 19 years of age. Both sequencing platforms revealed that Firmicutes dominated in the saliva, whereas Firmicutes and Actinobacteria abundances were similar in tooth biofilm. Saliva microbiota discriminated caries-affected from caries-free adolescents, with enumeration of Scardovia wiggsiae, Streptococcus mutans, Bifidobacterium longum, Leptotrichia sp. HOT498, and Selenomonas spp. in caries-affected participants. Adolescents with B. longum in saliva had significantly higher 2-year caries increment. PacBio SMRT revealed Corynebacterium matruchotii as the most prevalent species in tooth biofilm. In conclusion, both sequencing methods were reliable and valid for oral samples, and saliva microbiota was associated with cross-sectional caries prevalence, especially S. wiggsiae, S. mutans, and B. longum; the latter also with the 2-year caries incidence.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138030 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-06221-z (DOI)000405895000013 ()
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications