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Amjadi, Golnaz
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Amjadi, G., Lundgren, T. & Persson, L. (2018). The Rebound Effect in Swedish Heavy Industry. Energy Economics, 71, 140-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Rebound Effect in Swedish Heavy Industry
2018 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 71, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy efficiency improvement (EEI) benefits the climate and matters for energy security. The potential emission and energy savings due to EEI may however not fully materialize due to the rebound effect. In this study, we measure the size of the rebound effect for fuel and electricity within the four most energy intensive sectors in Sweden: pulp and paper, basic iron and steel, chemical, and mining. We use a detailed firm-level panel data set for 2000–2008 and apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) for measuring the rebound effect. We find that neither fuel nor electricity rebound effects fully offset the potential energy and emission savings. Among the determinants, we find CO2 intensity and fuel/electricity share to be useful indicators for identifying firms with higher or lower rebound effect within each sector.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Energy efficiency improvement, Rebound effect, Stochastic Frontier Analysis
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145666 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2018.02.001 (DOI)000431159100011 ()2-s2.0-85042628038 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Amjadi, G., Lundgren, T., Persson, L. & Zhang, S. (2017). The rebound effect in the Swedish heavy industry.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The rebound effect in the Swedish heavy industry
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Energy efficiency improvement (EEI) benefits the climate and matters for energy security. The potential emission and energy savings due to EEI may however not fully materialize due to the rebound effect. In this study, we measure the size of rebound effect for the two energy types fuel and electricity within the four most energy intensive sectors in Sweden – pulp and paper, basic iron and steel, chemical, and mining. We use a detailed firm-level panel data set for the period 2000-2008 and apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA) for measuring the rebound effect. We find that both fuel and electricity rebound effects do not fully offset the potential for energy and emission savings. Furthermore, we find CO2 intensity and fuel and electricity share as the two main determinants of rebound effect in Swedish heavy industry. Our results seems to imply that it matters both to what extent and where to promote EEI, as the rebound effect varies between sectors as well as between firms within sectors. 

Series
CERE working paper ; 2017:1
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130877 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-31 Created: 2017-01-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09
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