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Davis, Louise
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Davis, L., Jowett, S. & Tafvelin, S. (2019). Communication Strategies: The Fuel for Quality Coach-Athlete Relationships and Athlete Satisfaction. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 2156.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication Strategies: The Fuel for Quality Coach-Athlete Relationships and Athlete Satisfaction
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 2156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present two-study paper examined the role of communication strategies that athletes use to develop their coach-athlete relationship. Study 1 examined the mediating role of motivation, support, and conflict management strategies between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and athletes' perceptions of sport satisfaction. Study 2 examined the longitudinal and mediational associations of communication strategies and relationship quality across two time points, over a 6-week period. Within both studies, data were collected through multi-section questionnaires assessing the studies' variables. For study 1, structural equation modeling highlighted significant indirect effects for motivation and support strategies between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and athletes' experiences of sport satisfaction. For study 2, significant indirect effects were found for the athletes' perceptions of the quality of the coach-athlete relationship at time 2 between athletes' use of communication strategies at time point 1 and time point 2. Together these findings provide support for the practical utility of communications strategies in enhancing the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and athlete's experiences of sport satisfaction. In addition, the findings provide evidence to highlight the potential cyclical relationship between communication and relationship quality across time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
communication, relationship quality, athlete satisfaction, longitudinal, coach-athlete relationship
National Category
Psychology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164046 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02156 (DOI)000487591100001 ()
Available from: 2019-10-15 Created: 2019-10-15 Last updated: 2019-10-15Bibliographically approved
Davis, L., Stenling, A., Gustafsson, H., Appleby, R. & Davis, P. (2019). Reducing the risk of athlete burnout: Psychosocial, sociocultural, and individual considerations for coaches. International journal of sports science & coaching, 14(4), 444-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reducing the risk of athlete burnout: Psychosocial, sociocultural, and individual considerations for coaches
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2019 (English)In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 444-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Past research suggests that athletes' relationships with their coach can act as a risk factor in the development of burnout. Coaching practice may be enhanced through understanding the multidimensional factors that can augment the associations between coach-athlete relationship quality and athlete burnout. The present study explored both individual difference characteristics (gender, age, and sport level) and sociocultural factors (sport type) as moderators of this relationship. Our findings show statistically significant interaction effects for gender and age. Coaches and practitioners working with younger athletes and male performers in particular, are advised to work with strategies aiming to build relationships and reduce the risk of burnout.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Age, coach-athlete relationships, gender
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162670 (URN)10.1177/1747954119861076 (DOI)000479122900002 ()
Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Appleby, R., Davis, L., Davis, P. A. & Gustafsson, H. (2018). Examining perceptions of teammates’ burnout and training hours in athlete burnout. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 12(3), 316-332
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining perceptions of teammates’ burnout and training hours in athlete burnout
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 316-332Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perceptions of teammates and training load have been shown to influence athletes' physical and psychological health; however, limited research has investigated these factors in relation to burnout. Athletes (N = 140) from a variety of competitive team sports, ranging in level from regional to professional, completed questionnaires measuring individual burnout, perceptions of teammates' burnout, and training hours perweek on two occasions separated by threemonths. After controlling for burnout at time one, training hours were associated with athletes' burnout and perceptions of teammates' burnout at time two. Multilevel modeling indicated actual team burnout (i.e., the average burnout score of the individual athletes in a team) and perceived team burnout were associated with individual's own burnout. The findings highlight that burnout is dynamic and relates to physiological stressors associated with training and psychological perceptions of teammates' burnout. Future research directions exploring potential social influences on athlete burnout are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
Keywords
exhaustion, global burnout, team sports, teammates, training load
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144442 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2017-0037 (DOI)000444270200003 ()
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Davis, P. A., Davis, L., Wills, S., Appleby, R. & Nieuwenhuys, A. (2018). Exploring "Sledging" and Interpersonal Emotion-Regulation Strategies in Professional Cricket. The Sport psychologist, 32(2), 136-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring "Sledging" and Interpersonal Emotion-Regulation Strategies in Professional Cricket
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2018 (English)In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study examines cricketers’ perceptions of emotional interactions between competitors. Semistructured interviews with 12 male professional cricketers explored experiences (i.e., emotions, cognitions, behaviors) relating to incidents during competition where they or an opponent attempted to evoke an emotional reaction (e.g., sledging). Cricketers described their use of sledging as aggressive actions and verbal interactions with the aim of disrupting concentration and altering the emotional states of opponents. They described experiencing a variety of emotions (e.g., anxiety, anger) in response to opponents’ attempts at interpersonal emotion regulation; linguistic analyses indicated that both positive than negative emotions were experienced. A range of strategies in response to competitors’ deliberate attempts at interpersonal emotion regulation were outlined. The present study extends previous research investigating interpersonal emotion regulation within teams by indicating that professional cricketers are aware of the impact of cognitions and emotions on performance and attempt to negatively influence these factors in competitors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics Publishers, 2018
Keywords
coping, qualitative, aggression, elite
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145302 (URN)10.1123/tsp.2017-0078 (DOI)000436980000006 ()2-s2.0-8504916859 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Davis, L., Appleby, R., Davis, P., Wetherell, M. & Gustafsson, H. (2018). The role of coach-athlete relationship quality in team sport athletes’ psychophysiological exhaustion: implications for physical and cognitive performance. Journal of Sports Sciences, 36(17), 1985-1992
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of coach-athlete relationship quality in team sport athletes’ psychophysiological exhaustion: implications for physical and cognitive performance
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 36, no 17, p. 1985-1992Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to examine associations between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and athlete exhaustion by assessing physiological and cognitive consequences. Male and female athletes (N = 82) representing seven teams across four different sports, participated in a quasi-experi- mental study measuring physical performance on a 5-meter multiple shuttle test, followed by a Stroop test to assess cognitive performance. Participants provided saliva samples measuring cortisol as a biomarker of acute stress response and completed questionnaires measuring exhaustion, and coach- athlete relationship quality. Structural equation modelling revealed a positive relationship between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and Stroop performance, and negative relationships between the quality of the coach-athlete relationship and cortisol responses to high-intensity exercise, cognitive testing, and exhaustion. The study supports previous research on socio-cognitive correlates of athlete exhaustion by highlighting associations with the quality of the coach-athlete relationship. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Coach-athlete relationship, exhaustion, team sports, teammate, performance
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144441 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2018.1429176 (DOI)000432728100010 ()29359646 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Davis, P. A. & Davis, L. (2016). Emotions and emotion regulation in coaching. In: Paul A. Davis (Ed.), The psychology of effective coaching and management: (pp. 285-306). New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotions and emotion regulation in coaching
2016 (English)In: The psychology of effective coaching and management / [ed] Paul A. Davis, New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016, p. 285-306Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129468 (URN)978-1-63483-787-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-30 Created: 2016-12-30 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
McQuade, S., Davis, L. & Nash, C. (2015). Positioning Mentoring as a Coach Development Tool: Recommendations for Future Practice and Research. Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), 67(3), 317-329
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positioning Mentoring as a Coach Development Tool: Recommendations for Future Practice and Research
2015 (English)In: Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), ISSN 0033-6297, E-ISSN 1543-2750, QUEST, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 317-329Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current thinking in coach education advocates mentoring as a development tool to connect theory and practice. However, little empirical evidence exists to evaluate the effectiveness of mentoring as a coach development tool. Business, education, and nursing precede the coaching industry in their mentoring practice, and research findings offered in these domains could be drawn upon to position mentoring as sports coaching development tool. Given the remote basis of some of mentor-coach relationships in sports coaching, additional learning can be drawn from mentoring conducted by virtual or electronic mediums. This article concludes with a series of reflective questions arising from research findings in other domains, designed to engage the potential coaching organization with the mentoring process.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145306 (URN)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Davis, L. & Jowett, S. (2014). Coach-athlete attachment and the quality of the coach-athlete relationship: implications for athlete's well-being. Journal of Sports Sciences, 32(15), 1454-1464
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coach-athlete attachment and the quality of the coach-athlete relationship: implications for athlete's well-being
2014 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 32, no 15, p. 1454-1464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined whether athletes’attachment styles with the coach were linked to aspects of the coach–athlete relationship quality and, in turn, whether relationship quality was linked to athletes’well-being. One hundred and ninety- two athletes completed a questionnaire measuring their attachment styles and relationship quality with the coach as well as their feelings of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA). Structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis found athletes’ avoidant and secure attachment styles to be associated with aspects of coach–athlete relationship quality such as social support, relationship depth, and interpersonal conflict. Interpersonal conflict appeared to play a key role in athletes’PA and NA. From a practical perspective, an understanding of conflict management could provide a resource that allows athletes (and coaches) to enhance the quality of their sporting relationships. Specifically, an awareness of proactive strategies (e.g., steps to clarify expectations) and reactive strategies (e.g., cooperation during the discussion of disagreements) could potentially lead both coaches and athletes to "broaden" their viewpoints and in turn "build" connections that are capable of generating positive emotions including interest, excitement, happiness, and zeal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2014
Keywords
attachment, positive affect, negative affect, relationships
National Category
Social Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145303 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2014.898183 (DOI)000340480500005 ()
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Rhind, D., Davis, L. & Jowett, S. (2014). Questionnaires. In: Lee Nelson, Ryan Groom and Paul Potrac (Ed.), Research methods in sports coaching: (pp. 111-122). Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Questionnaires
2014 (English)In: Research methods in sports coaching / [ed] Lee Nelson, Ryan Groom and Paul Potrac, Taylor & Francis, 2014, p. 111-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145319 (URN)9780415626828 (ISBN)9780415626804 (ISBN)9780203797549 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Davis, L., Jowett, S. & Lafrenière, M.-A. (2013). An attachment theory perspective in the examination of relational processes associated with coach-athlete dyads. Journal of sport and exercise psychology, 35(2), 156-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An attachment theory perspective in the examination of relational processes associated with coach-athlete dyads
2013 (English)In: Journal of sport and exercise psychology, ISSN 0895-2779, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 156-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the current study was to examine actor and partner effects of (a) athletes’ and coaches’ attachment styles (avoidant and anxious) on the quality of the coach-athlete relationship, and (b) athletes’ and coaches’ quality of the coach-athlete relationship on relationship satisfaction employing the actor-partner interdependence model (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006). Coaches (N = 107) and athletes (N = 107) completed a questionnaire related to attachment styles, relationship quality, and relationship satisfaction. Structural equation model analyses revealed (a) actor effects for coaches’ and athletes’ avoidant attachment styles on their own perception of relationship quality and coaches’ and athletes’ perception of relationship quality on their own perception of relationship satisfaction, and (b) partner effects for athletes’ avoidant attachment style on coaches’ perceptions of relationship quality and for coaches’ perceptions of relationship quality on athletes’ perceptions of relationship satisfaction. The findings highlight that attachments styles can help us understand the processes involved in the formation and maintenance of quality relational bonds between coaches and athletes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Champaign: Human Kinetics, 2013
Keywords
insecure attachment, coach-athlete dyads, relationship quality, actor effects, partner effects
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145307 (URN)10.1123/jsep.35.2.156 (DOI)000317710200004 ()
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
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