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Bodén, Stina
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Bodén, S., Myte, R., Wennberg, M., Harlid, S., Johansson, I., Shivappa, N., . . . Nilsson, L. M. (2019). The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores. PLoS ONE, 14(4), Article ID e0214551.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Inflammation-related mechanisms may contribute to the link between diet and cancer. We sought to investigate the inflammatory impact of diet on cancer risk using the Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and an adapted Mediterranean diet score (MDS).

METHODS: This population-based, prospective cohort study used self-reported dietary data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, including 100,881 participants, of whom 35,393 had repeated measures. Associations between dietary patterns and cancer risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. We also used restricted cubic splines to test for potential non-linear associations.

RESULTS: A total of 9,250 incident cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 15 years. The two dietary patterns were moderately correlated to each other and had similar associations with cancer risk, predominantly lung cancer in men (DII per tertile decrease: Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (0.66-0.99), MDS per tertile increase: HR 0.86 (0.72-1.03)), and gastric cancer in men (DII: 0.73 (0.53-0.99), MDS: 0.73 (0.56-0.96)). Associations were, in general, found to be linear. We found no longitudinal association between 10-year change in diet and cancer risk.

CONCLUSION: We confirm small, but consistent and statistically significant associations between a more anti-inflammatory or healthier diet and reduced risk of cancer, including a lower risk of lung and gastric cancer in men. The dietary indexes produced similar associations with respect to the risk of cancer.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158790 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0214551 (DOI)000464349000016 ()30978193 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Sundkvist, A., Myte, R., Bodén, S., Enroth, S., Gyllensten, U., Harlid, S. & van Guelpen, B. (2018). Targeted plasma proteomics identifies a novel, robust association between cornulin and Swedish moist snuff. Scientific Reports, 8(1), Article ID 2320.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeted plasma proteomics identifies a novel, robust association between cornulin and Swedish moist snuff
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lifestyle behaviors are believed to influence the body's inflammatory state. Chronic low-grade inflammation contributes to the development of major non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Inflammation may thus be an important link between lifestyle and disease. We evaluated self-reported physical activity, tobacco use and alcohol consumption in relation to plasma levels of 160 validated inflammatory and cancer biomarkers. The study included 138 participants from a population-based cohort, all with repeated sampling of plasma and data ten years apart, allowing consideration of both intra- and inter-individual variation. Of 17 relationships identified, the strongest was an independent, positive association between cornulin (CRNN) and Swedish moist snuff (snus) use. We replicated the finding in a second cohort of 501 individuals, in which a dose-response relationship was also observed. Snus explained approximately one fifth of the variance in CRNN levels in both sample sets (18% and 23%). In conclusion, we identified a novel, independent, dose-dependent association between CRNN and snus use. Further study is warranted, to evaluate the performance of CRNN as a potential snus biomarker. The putative importance of lifestyle behaviors on a wide range of protein biomarkers illustrates the need for more personalized biomarker cut-offs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145046 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-20794-3 (DOI)29396534 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Zamora-Ros, R., Barupal, D. K., Rothwell, J. A., Jenab, M., Fedirko, V., Romieu, I., . . . Scalbert, A. (2017). Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. International Journal of Cancer, 140(8), 1836-1844
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 8, p. 1836-1844Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flavonoids have been shown to inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and protect against colorectal carcinogenesis in animal models. However, epidemiological evidence on the potential role of flavonoid intake in colorectal cancer (CRC) development remains sparse and inconsistent. We evaluated the association between dietary intakes of total flavonoids and their subclasses and risk of development of CRC, within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. A cohort of 477,312 adult men and women were recruited in 10 European countries. At baseline, dietary intakes of total flavonoids and individual subclasses were estimated using centre-specific validated dietary questionnaires and composition data from the Phenol-Explorer database. During an average of 11 years of follow-up, 4,517 new cases of primary CRC were identified, of which 2,869 were colon (proximal = 1,298 and distal = 1,266) and 1,648 rectal tumours. No association was found between total flavonoid intake and the risk of overall CRC (HR for comparison of extreme quintiles 1.05, 95% CI 0.93-1.18; p-trend = 0.58) or any CRC subtype. No association was also observed with any intake of individual flavonoid subclasses. Similar results were observed for flavonoid intake expressed as glycosides or aglycone equivalents. Intake of total flavonoids and flavonoid subclasses, as estimated from dietary questionnaires, did not show any association with risk of CRC development.

Keywords
flavonoids, diet, colorectal cancer, prospective cohort, EPIC
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133733 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30582 (DOI)000395181800014 ()28006847 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bodén, S., Wennberg, M., Van Guelpen, B., Johansson, I., Lindahl, B., Andersson, J., . . . Nilsson, L. M. (2017). Dietary inflammatory index and risk of first myocardial infarction: a prospective population-based study. Nutrition Journal, 16, Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary inflammatory index and risk of first myocardial infarction: a prospective population-based study
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2017 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 16, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chronic, low-grade inflammation is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The inflammatory impact of diet can be reflected by concentrations of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream and the inflammatory potential of diet can be estimated by the dietary inflammatory index (DII(TM)), which has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk in some previous studies. We aimed to examine the association between the DII and the risk of first myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based study with long follow-up.

METHOD: We conducted a prospective case-control study of 1389 verified cases of first MI and 5555 matched controls nested within the population-based cohorts of the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS), of which the largest is the ongoing Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) with nearly 100 000 participants during the study period. Median follow-up from recruitment to MI diagnosis was 6.4 years (6.2 for men and 7.2 for women). DII scores were derived from a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered in 1986-2006. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using quartile 1 (most anti-inflammatory diet) as the reference category. For validation, general linear models were used to estimate the association between the DII scores and two inflammatory markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in a subset (n = 605) of the study population.

RESULTS: Male participants with the most pro-inflammatory DII scores had an increased risk of MI [ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.57 (95% CI 1.21-2.02) P trend = 0.02], which was essentially unchanged after adjustment for potential confounders, including cardiovascular risk factors [ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.50 (95% CI 1.14-1.99), P trend = 0.10]. No association was found between DII and MI in women. An increase of one DII score unit was associated with 9% higher hsCRP (95% CI 0.03-0.14) and 6% higher IL-6 (95% CI 0.02-0.11) in 605 controls with biomarker data available.

CONCLUSION: A pro-inflammatory diet was associated with an elevated risk of first myocardial infarction in men; whereas for women the relationship was null. Consideration of the inflammatory impact of diet could improve prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Keywords
DII Dietary inflammatory index, MI Myocardial infarction, NSHDS Northern Sweden health and disease study, VIP Vasterbotten intervention programme, MONICA Monitoring of trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease, CVD cardiovascular disease, hsCRP high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6 interleukin 6
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133833 (URN)10.1186/s12937-017-0243-8 (DOI)000398222800001 ()28376792 (PubMedID)
Note

Publicerad som open source med stöd från Arcums strategiska medel.

Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Stepien, M., Jenab, M., Freisling, H., Becker, N.-P., Czuban, M., Tjonneland, A., . . . Hughes, D. J. (2017). Pre-diagnostic copper and zinc biomarkers and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Carcinogenesis, 38(7), 699-707
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-diagnostic copper and zinc biomarkers and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort
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2017 (English)In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 699-707Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adequate intake of copper and zinc, two essential micronutrients, are important for antioxidant functions. Their imbalance may have implications for development of diseases like colorectal cancer (CRC), where oxidative stress is thought to be etiologically involved. As evidence from prospective epidemiologic studies is lacking, we conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to investigate the association between circulating levels of copper and zinc, and their calculated ratio, with risk of CRC development. Copper and zinc levels were measured by reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in 966 cases and 966 matched controls. Multivariable adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression and are presented for the fifth versus first quintile. Higher circulating concentration of copper was associated with a raised CRC risk (OR = 1.50; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.13; P-trend = 0.02) whereas an inverse association with cancer risk was observed for higher zinc levels (OR = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.97; P-trend = 0.07). Consequently, the ratio of copper/zinc was positively associated with CRC (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.40; P-trend = 0.0005). In subgroup analyses by follow-up time, the associations remained statistically significant only in those diagnosed within 2 years of blood collection. In conclusion, these data suggest that copper or copper levels in relation to zinc (copper to zinc ratio) become imbalanced in the process of CRC development. Mechanistic studies into the underlying mechanisms of regulation and action are required to further examine a possible role for higher copper and copper/ zinc ratio levels in CRC development and progression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138230 (URN)10.1093/carcin/bgx051 (DOI)000406237300004 ()
Available from: 2017-08-18 Created: 2017-08-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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