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Irewall, Tommie
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Lennelöv, E., Irewall, T., Naumburg, E., Lindberg, A. & Stenfors, N. (2019). The Prevalence of Asthma and Respiratory Symptoms among Cross-Country Skiers in Early Adolescence. Canadian Respiratory Journal, 2019, Article ID 1514353.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Prevalence of Asthma and Respiratory Symptoms among Cross-Country Skiers in Early Adolescence
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2019 (English)In: Canadian Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1916-7245, Vol. 2019, article id 1514353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine the prevalence of asthma and respiratory symptoms among Swedish cross-country skiers in early adolescence in comparison to a population-based reference group of similar ages.

Methods: A postal questionnaire on asthma, asthma medication, allergy, respiratory symptoms, and physical activity was distributed to Swedish competitive cross-country skiers aged 12–15 years (n = 331) and a population-based reference group (n = 1000). The level of asthma control was measured by the Asthma Control Test.

Results: The response rate was 27% (n = 87) among skiers and 29% (n = 292) in the reference group. The prevalence of self-reported asthma (physician-diagnosed asthma and use of asthma medication in the last 12 months) and the prevalence of reported wheezing during the last 12 months were 23% and 25%, respectively, among skiers, which were significantly higher than the values reported in the reference group (12% and 14%). Skiers exercised more hours/week than the reference group. Among adolescents with self-reported asthma, neither the usage of asthma medications nor the level of asthma control according to the Asthma Control Test differed between skiers and the reference group.

Conclusions: Adolescent competitive cross-country skiers have an increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma compared to nonskiers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2019
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165207 (URN)10.1155/2019/1514353 (DOI)000493514500001 ()31636769 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072988852 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Näsman, A., Irewall, T., Hållmarker, U., Lindberg, A. & Stenfors, N. (2018). Asthma and Asthma Medication Are Common among Recreational Athletes Participating in Endurance Sport Competitions. Canadian Respiratory Journal, 2018, Article ID 3238546.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asthma and Asthma Medication Are Common among Recreational Athletes Participating in Endurance Sport Competitions
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2018 (English)In: Canadian Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1198-2241, Vol. 2018, article id 3238546Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Asthma prevalence is high among elite endurance athletes, but little is known about its prevalence among competitive recreational athletes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of self-reported asthma and asthma medication use among competitive recreational endurance athletes and their association with training.

Methods: A web survey on asthma and medication was conducted among 38,603 adult participants of three Swedish endurance competitions (cross-country running, cross-country skiing, and swimming).

Results: The overall response rate was 29%. The prevalence of self-reported asthma (physician-diagnosed asthma and use of asthma medication in the last 12 months) was 12%. Among those reporting asthma, 23% used inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta-agonists daily. We found no association between training volume and daily use of asthma medication, except a trend in relation to short-acting beta-agonists. Independent predictors of self-reported asthma were female sex, allergic rhinitis, previous eczema, family history of asthma, cycling, and training for >5 h 50 min/week.

Conclusions: The prevalence of self-reported asthma among Swedish competitive recreational endurance athletes appears to be higher than that in the general Swedish population. A large proportion of recreational athletes were reported with asthma use medications, indicating an association between high physical activity and self-reported asthma among competitive recreational athletes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2018
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151199 (URN)10.1155/2018/3238546 (DOI)000437172400001 ()30034562 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L. M., Irewall, T., Lindberg, A. & Stenfors, N. (2018). Prevalence, age at onset, and risk factors of self-reported asthma among Swedish adolescent elite cross-country skiers. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 28(1), 180-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence, age at onset, and risk factors of self-reported asthma among Swedish adolescent elite cross-country skiers
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the study was to compare the prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma and age at asthma onset between Swedish adolescent elite skiers and a reference group and to assess risk factors associated with asthma. Postal questionnaires were sent to 253 pupils at the Swedish National Elite Sport Schools for cross-country skiing, biathlon, and ski-orienteering (skiers) and a random sample of 500 adolescents aged 16-20, matched for sport school municipalities (reference). The response rate was 96% among the skiers and 48% in the reference group. The proportion of participants with self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma was higher among skiers than in the reference group (27 vs 19%, P=.046). Female skiers reported a higher prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma compared to male skiers (34 vs 20%, P=.021). The median age at asthma onset was higher among skiers (12.0 vs 8.0years; P<.001). Female sex, family history of asthma, nasal allergy, and being a skier were risk factors associated with self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma. Swedish adolescent elite cross-country skiers have a higher asthma prevalence and later age at asthma onset compared to a reference population. Being an adolescent, elite skier is an independent risk factor associated with asthma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
asthma, epidemiology, athlete, skiing
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144355 (URN)10.1111/sms.12879 (DOI)000422630100019 ()28314090 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
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