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Weiderpass, ElisabeteORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2237-0128
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Zamora-Ros, R., Beraud, V., Franceschi, S., Cayssials, V., Tsilidis, K. K., Boutron-Ruault, M.-C., . . . Rinaldi, S. (2018). Consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juices and differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. International Journal of Cancer, 142(3), 449-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juices and differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 449-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is considered as probably protective against overall cancer risk, but results in previous studies are not consistent for thyroid cancer (TC). The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, fruit juices and differentiated thyroid cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The EPIC study is a cohort including over half a million participants, recruited between 1991 and 2000. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 748 incident first primary differentiated TC cases were identified. F&V and fruit juice intakes were assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Comparing the highest versus lowest quartile of intake, differentiated TC risk was not associated with intakes of total F&V (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.68-1.15; p-trend=0.44), vegetables (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.69-1.14; p-trend=0.56), or fruit (HR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.79-1.26; p-trend=0.64). No significant association was observed with any individual type of vegetable or fruit. However, there was a positive borderline trend with fruit juice intake (HR: 1.23; 95% CI: 0.98-1.53; p-trend=0.06). This study did not find any significant association between F&V intakes and differentiated TC risk; however a positive trend with fruit juice intake was observed, possibly related to its high sugar content.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
thyroid cancer, fruits, vegetables, fruit juices, intake, EPIC
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143705 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30880 (DOI)000417763600004 ()28688112 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fortner, R. T., Schock, H., Jung, S., Allen, N. E., Arslan, A. A., Brinton, L. A., . . . Dorgan, J. F. (2017). Anti-Mullerian hormone and endometrial cancer: a multi-cohort study. British Journal of Cancer, 117(9), 1412-1418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-Mullerian hormone and endometrial cancer: a multi-cohort study
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2017 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 117, no 9, p. 1412-1418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Mullerian ducts are the embryological precursors of the female reproductive tract, including the uterus; anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) has a key role in the regulation of foetal sexual differentiation. Anti-Mullerian hormone inhibits endometrial tumour growth in experimental models by stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. To date, there are no prospective epidemiologic data on circulating AMH and endometrial cancer risk. Methods: We investigated this association among women premenopausal at blood collection in a multicohort study including participants from eight studies located in the United States, Europe, and China. We identified 329 endometrial cancer cases and 339 matched controls. AntiMullerian hormone concentrations in blood were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) across tertiles and for a doubling of AMH concentrations (ORlog2). Subgroup analyses were performed by ages at blood donation and diagnosis, oral contraceptive use, and tumour characteristics. Results: Anti-Mullerian hormone was not associated with the risk of endometrial cancer overall (ORlog(2): 1.07 (0.99-1.17)), or with any of the examined subgroups. Conclusions: Although experimental models implicate AMH in endometrial cancer growth inhibition, our findings do not support a role for circulating AMH in the aetiology of endometrial cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017
Keywords
endometrial cancer, anti-Mullerian hormone, Mullerian inhibiting substance, multicohort study
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141826 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2017.299 (DOI)000413527300019 ()28873086 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stepien, M., Hughes, D. J., Hybsier, S., Bamia, C., Tjønneland, A., Overvad, K., . . . Jenab, M. (2017). Circulating copper and zinc levels and risk of hepatobiliary cancers in Europeans. British Journal of Cancer, 116(5), 688-696
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating copper and zinc levels and risk of hepatobiliary cancers in Europeans
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2017 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 116, no 5, p. 688-696Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Copper and zinc are essential micronutrients and cofactors of many enzymatic reactions that may be involved in liver-cancer development. We aimed to assess pre-diagnostic circulating levels of copper, zinc and their ratio (Cu/Zn) in relation to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) and gall bladder and biliary tract (GBTC) cancers. Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Serum zinc and copper levels were measured in baseline blood samples by total reflection X-ray fluorescence in cancer cases (HCC n = 106, IHDB n = 34, GBTC n = 96) and their matched controls (1: 1). The Cu/Zn ratio, an indicator of the balance between the micronutrients, was computed. Multivariable adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR; 95% CI) were used to estimate cancer risk. Results: For HCC, the highest vs lowest tertile showed a strong inverse association for zinc (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.13-0.98, Ptrend = 0.0123), but no association for copper (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.45-2.46, Ptrend = 0.8878) in multivariable models. The calculated Cu/ Zn ratio showed a positive association for HCC (OR = 4.63; 95% CI: 1.41-15.27, Ptrend = 0.0135). For IHBC and GBTC, no significant associations were observed. Conclusions: Zinc may have a role in preventing liver-cancer development, but this finding requires further investigation in other settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017
Keywords
copper, zinc, hepatocellular carcinoma, prospective cohort, nested case-control study, cancer risk factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133525 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2017.1 (DOI)000395696200017 ()28152549 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-15 Created: 2017-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Caini, S., Masala, G., Saieva, C., Kvaskoff, M., Sacerdote, C., Savoye, I., . . . Palli, D. (2017). Coffee, tea and melanoma risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 140(10), 2246-2255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee, tea and melanoma risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 10, p. 2246-2255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What's new? Laboratory studies suggest that coffee and tea protect against melanoma, but epidemiological findings are inconsistent. Here the authors studied more than 400,000 participants within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and confirmed an inverse association between caffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk. No association was found with decaffeinated coffee or tea. Interestingly, drinking coffee only protected men, but not women, from developing the often fatal skin cancer, raising interesting questions about gender-specific hormones or coffee habits influencing this association. In vitro and animal studies suggest that bioactive constituents of coffee and tea may have anticarcinogenic effects against cutaneous melanoma; however, epidemiological evidence is limited to date. We examined the relationships between coffee (total, caffeinated or decaffeinated) and tea consumption and risk of melanoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a multicentre prospective study that enrolled over 500,000 participants aged 25-70 years from ten European countries in 1992-2000. Information on coffee and tea drinking was collected at baseline using validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between coffee and tea consumption and melanoma risk. Overall, 2,712 melanoma cases were identified during a median follow-up of 14.9 years among 476,160 study participants. Consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men (HR for highest quartile of consumption vs. non-consumers 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69) but not among women (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.62-1.47). There were no statistically significant associations between consumption of decaffeinated coffee or tea and the risk of melanoma among both men and women. The consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men in this large cohort study. Further investigations are warranted to confirm our findings and clarify the possible role of caffeine and other coffee compounds in reducing the risk of melanoma.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134695 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30659 (DOI)000399313200008 ()28218395 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Zamora-Ros, R., Barupal, D. K., Rothwell, J. A., Jenab, M., Fedirko, V., Romieu, I., . . . Scalbert, A. (2017). Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. International Journal of Cancer, 140(8), 1836-1844
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 8, p. 1836-1844Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flavonoids have been shown to inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and protect against colorectal carcinogenesis in animal models. However, epidemiological evidence on the potential role of flavonoid intake in colorectal cancer (CRC) development remains sparse and inconsistent. We evaluated the association between dietary intakes of total flavonoids and their subclasses and risk of development of CRC, within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. A cohort of 477,312 adult men and women were recruited in 10 European countries. At baseline, dietary intakes of total flavonoids and individual subclasses were estimated using centre-specific validated dietary questionnaires and composition data from the Phenol-Explorer database. During an average of 11 years of follow-up, 4,517 new cases of primary CRC were identified, of which 2,869 were colon (proximal = 1,298 and distal = 1,266) and 1,648 rectal tumours. No association was found between total flavonoid intake and the risk of overall CRC (HR for comparison of extreme quintiles 1.05, 95% CI 0.93-1.18; p-trend = 0.58) or any CRC subtype. No association was also observed with any intake of individual flavonoid subclasses. Similar results were observed for flavonoid intake expressed as glycosides or aglycone equivalents. Intake of total flavonoids and flavonoid subclasses, as estimated from dietary questionnaires, did not show any association with risk of CRC development.

Keywords
flavonoids, diet, colorectal cancer, prospective cohort, EPIC
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133733 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30582 (DOI)000395181800014 ()28006847 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Afshin, A., Forouzanfar, M. H., Reitsma, M. B., Sur, P., Estep, K., Lee, A., . . . Murray, C. J. L. (2017). Health Effects of Overweight and Obesity in 195 Countries over 25 Years. New England Journal of Medicine, 377(1), 13-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Effects of Overweight and Obesity in 195 Countries over 25 Years
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2017 (English)In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 377, no 1, p. 13-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND Although the rising pandemic of obesity has received major attention in many countries, the effects of this attention on trends and the disease burden of obesity remain uncertain. METHODS We analyzed data from 68.5 million persons to assess the trends in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adults between 1980 and 2015. Using the Global Burden of Disease study data and methods, we also quantified the burden of disease related to high body-mass index (BMI), according to age, sex, cause, and BMI in 195 countries between 1990 and 2015. RESULTS In 2015, a total of 107.7 million children and 603.7 million adults were obese. Since 1980, the prevalence of obesity has doubled in more than 70 countries and has continuously increased in most other countries. Although the prevalence of obesity among children has been lower than that among adults, the rate of increase in childhood obesity in many countries has been greater than the rate of increase in adult obesity. High BMI accounted for 4.0 million deaths globally, nearly 40% of which occurred in persons who were not obese. More than two thirds of deaths related to high BMI were due to cardiovascular disease. The disease burden related to high BMI has increased since 1990; however, the rate of this increase has been attenuated owing to decreases in underlying rates of death from cardiovascular disease. CONCLUSIONS The rapid increase in the prevalence and disease burden of elevated BMI highlights the need for continued focus on surveillance of BMI and identification, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based interventions to address this problem. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL SOC, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138542 (URN)10.1056/NEJMoa1614362 (DOI)000404730000005 ()28604169 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Huang, J., Zagai, U., Hallmans, G., Nyren, O., Engstrand, L., Stolzenberg-Solomon, R., . . . Ye, W. (2017). Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study. International Journal of Cancer, 140(8), 1727-1735
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 8, p. 1727-1735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction < 0.01). Our findings provided evidence supporting the null association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms.

Keywords
H. pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis, pancreatic cancer risk, nested case-control study
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133732 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30590 (DOI)000395181800002 ()28032715 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Molina-Montes, E., Sanchez, M.-J., Buckland, G., Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B., Weiderpass, E., Amiano, P., . . . Duell, E. J. (2017). Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. British Journal of Cancer, 116(6), 811-820
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort
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2017 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 811-820Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

Methods: Over half a million participants from 10 European countries were followed up for over 11 years, after which 865 newly diagnosed exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified. Adherence to the MD was estimated through an adapted score without the alcohol component (arMED) to discount alcohol-related harmful effects. Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by age, sex and centre, and adjusted for energy intake, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake and diabetes status at recruitment, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with pancreatic cancer and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results: Adherence to the arMED score was not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR highvs low adherence=0.99; 95% CI: 0.77–1.26, and HR per increments of two units in adherence to arMED=1.00; 95% CI: 0.94–1.06). There was no convincing evidence for heterogeneity by smoking status, body mass index, diabetes or European region. There was also no evidence of significant associations in analyses involving microscopically confirmed cases, plausible reporters of energy intake or other definitions of the MD pattern.

Conclusions: A high adherence to the MD is not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC study.

Keywords
Mediterranean diet, pancreatic cancer, cohort study
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133758 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2017.14 (DOI)000397436100017 ()28170373 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ose, J., Schock, H., Poole, E. M., Lehtinen, M., Visvanathan, K., Helzlsouer, K., . . . Fortner, R. T. (2017). Pre-diagnosis insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by histological subtypes: A collaborative re-analysis from the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cancer Causes and Control, 28(5), 429-435
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-diagnosis insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by histological subtypes: A collaborative re-analysis from the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium
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2017 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 429-435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biologic evidence suggests that the Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-family may be involved in the etiology of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC). However, prospective studies investigating the role of IGF-I in ovarian carcinogenesis have yielded conflicting results. We pooled and harmonized data from 6 case-control studies nested within the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium to investigate the association between pre-diagnosis IGF-I concentrations and subsequent risk of EOC. We evaluated IGF-I concentrations and risk of EOC overall and by tumor subtype (defined by histology, grade, stage) in 1,270 cases and 2,907 matched controls. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Doubling of IGF-I concentration was associated with significantly lower risk of overall EOC [ORlog2 = 0.82; CI 0.72-0.93]. We observed no heterogeneity by tumor characteristics (e.g., histology, p (het) = 0.62), menopausal status at blood collection (p (het) = 0.79), or age at diagnosis (p (het) = 0.60). These results suggest that IGF-I concentrations are inversely associated with EOC risk, independent of histological phenotype. Future prospective research should consider potential mechanisms for this association, including, considering other members of the IGF-family to better characterize the role of IGF-signaling in the etiology of EOC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
Keywords
Epithelial ovarian cancer, IGF-I, Histological subtypes, Developmental pathways
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134809 (URN)10.1007/s10552-017-0852-8 (DOI)000399217500008 ()28205047 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Perez-Cornago, A., Appleby, P. N., Tipper, S., Key, T. J., Allen, N. E., Nieters, A., . . . Travis, R. C. (2017). Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 140(5), 1111-1118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 5, p. 1111-1118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has cancer promoting activities. However, the hypothesis that circulating IGF-I concentration is related to risk of lymphoma overall or its subtypes has not been examined prospectively. IGF-I concentration was measured in pre-diagnostic plasma samples from a nested case-control study of 1,072 cases of lymphoid malignancies and 1,072 individually matched controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for lymphoma were calculated using conditional logistic regression. IGF-I concentration was not associated with overall lymphoma risk (multivariable-adjusted OR for highest versus lowest third = 0.77 [95% CI = 0.57-1.03], p(trend) = 0.06). There was no statistical evidence of heterogeneity in this association with IGF-I by sex, age at blood collection, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age at diagnosis, or body mass index (pheterogeneity for all >= 0.05). There were no associations between IGF-I concentration and risk for specific BCL subtypes, T-cell lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma, although number of cases were small. In this European population, IGF-I concentration was not associated with risk of overall lymphoma. This study provides the first prospective evidence on circulating IGF-I concentrations and risk of lymphoma. Further What's new? Insulin-like growth factor I does not appear to influence lymphoma risk, according to new results. IGF-I can promote some cancers, but there hasn't been a prospective epidemiological study examining the link between IGF-I concentration and lymphoma risk. To uncover a link, these authors arranged a NESTED case-control study with participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). They tested for IGF-I in pre-diagnosis samples and found no association between the factor and overall lymphoma risk, nor with any subtype, although the number of cases was small for each subtype, and further studies are necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2017
Keywords
prospective, lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, plasma, IGF-I, EPIC cohort, nested case-control
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132793 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30528 (DOI)000393976100014 ()27870006 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2237-0128

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