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Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Demiroglu, O. C., Lundmark, L. & Strömgren, M. (2019). Development of downhill skiing tourism in Sweden: past, present, and future. In: Ulrike Pröbstl-Haider, Harold Richins and Stefan Türk (Ed.), Winter tourism: trends and challenges (pp. 305-323). CABI Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of downhill skiing tourism in Sweden: past, present, and future
2019 (English)In: Winter tourism: trends and challenges / [ed] Ulrike Pröbstl-Haider, Harold Richins and Stefan Türk, CABI Publishing, 2019, p. 305-323Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CABI Publishing, 2019
Series
CABI series in tourism management research
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163994 (URN)9781786395207 (ISBN)9781786395214 (ISBN)9781786395221 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C., Dannevig, H. & Aall, C. (2018). Climate change acknowledgement and responses of summer (glacier) ski visitors in Norway. Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, 18(4), 419-438
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change acknowledgement and responses of summer (glacier) ski visitors in Norway
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 419-438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mutual interaction of climate change and the highly weatherdependent ski tourism business is drawing increasing attention from the academic, commercial and political arenas. Changes in the cryosphere are becoming major determinants of the sustainability of ski areas. Therefore, there is a great deal of literature entailing impact and adaptation studies regarding ski areas, resorts, and destinations; however, research on the demand side of the issue is relatively limited. In this paper, the relationship between climate change and a niche segment of ski tourism, summer skiing, is discussed with regard to the awareness, perceptions, and mitigation and substitution behaviours of visitors to the summer downhill ski centres in Norway – an underresearched country, despite its recognition as the cradle of skiing. For this purpose, a comprehensive survey was administered to a sample of 224 subjects. The results revealed high climate change awareness but limited climate friendliness, and a strong emphasis on the immediate climate impacts on summer skiing that create a tendency towards ski activity substitution within Norway. Individual profiles also played a significant role in the anticipated mitigation and substitution behaviours. The implications of the results involving demand attitude and behaviour are further discussed with regard to the suppliers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Summer (glacier) ski tourism, climate change, mitigation, substitution, Norway
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152176 (URN)10.1080/15022250.2018.1522721 (DOI)000446598500007 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72The Research Council of Norway, 22 14 41
Available from: 2018-09-29 Created: 2018-09-29 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C. & Ülgen, İ. G. (2018). Climate Change and Tourism: An Extended Framework. In: : . Paper presented at 2. International Sustainable Tourism Congress, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate Change and Tourism: An Extended Framework
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Climate change and tourism mutually interact under complexity. Initially, climate change imposes its impacts on various tourism types while origins, destinations and flows of the tourism system constitute a certain amount of the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions that drive climate change. As responses to these initial conditions, tourism supply and demand engage in strategies and behaviours that allow for adaptation to impacts whereas global and local efforts for mitigation of climate change focus on reducing emissions resulting from tourism activities. At a tertiary level, one finds the rebound effects that arise from underdeveloped adaptation and mitigation efforts. These effects manifest themselves as amplified vulnerabilities and emissions due to maladaptation and mal-mitigation moves. This study explains the climate-tourism relationship with an emphasis on such tertiary dimension, and presents the extended framework by a holistic case of winter tourism.

Keywords
Tourism, Climate Change, Maladaptation, Mal-mitigation, Rebound Effects
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155428 (URN)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Conference
2. International Sustainable Tourism Congress, 2018
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Mayer, M., Demiroglu, O. C. & Ozcelebi, O. (2018). Microclimatic volatility and elasticity of glacier skiing demand. Sustainability, 10(10), Article ID 3536.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microclimatic volatility and elasticity of glacier skiing demand
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 3536Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effects of climate conditions and weather on ski tourism have become a hot topic as the negative impacts of climate change on ski tourism become increasingly visible. This study aims at measuring the significance and magnitude of long-term diurnal and daily weather conditions on lift frequentation at an Austrian glacier ski area in terms of the winter and the summer skiing offers. In doing so, it utilizes an autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH) model to reveal and quantify any volatility associated with ski area visitation and then employs regression models to account for any microclimatic elasticity of glacier skiing demand. The main findings reveal a significant volatility in ski area visitation, especially during the summer seasons. While this study does not aim for an ultimate determination on the reasons for such volatility, skiing demand models illustrate the importance of thermal comfort, especially wind chill factor (WCF), as a major determinant of demand sensitivity for glacier skiing as well as non-skier visits during the summer season. Significant, albeit inelastic, relationships between other microclimatic characteristics, such as snow depth and relative humidity, with visitation and lift frequentation are also identified. Based on these findings, implications according to a changing climate and practical suggestions on the sustainability of winter and summer skiing activities are provided.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
climate change, climate elasticity, climate variability, glacier skiing, summer skiing, volatility, autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity, Cochrane–Orcutt procedure, Austria
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152296 (URN)10.3390/su10103536 (DOI)000448559400178 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Projects
Mobilising the Rural
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-72
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
diva2:1162737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Case study Turkey: climate change and coastal tourism: impacts of climate change on the Turquoise coast
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2017 (English)In: Global climate change and coastal tourism: recognizing problems, managing solutions and future expectations / [ed] Andrew Jones and Michael Phillips, CABI Publishing, 2017, p. 247-262Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CABI Publishing, 2017
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142586 (URN)881251 (Local ID)9781780648439 (ISBN)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C. (2017). Ski Tourism, Europe. In: Linda L. Lowry (Ed.), The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism: . Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ski Tourism, Europe
2017 (English)In: The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism / [ed] Linda L. Lowry, Sage Publications, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139541 (URN)10.4135/9781483368924.n408 (DOI)9781483368948 (ISBN)9781483368924 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-17 Created: 2017-09-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C. (2017). Ski Tourism, U.S.. In: Linda L. Lowry (Ed.), The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism: . Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ski Tourism, U.S.
2017 (English)In: The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Travel and Tourism / [ed] Linda L. Lowry, Sage Publications, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139543 (URN)10.4135/9781483368924.n409 (DOI)9781483368948 (ISBN)9781483368924 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-17 Created: 2017-09-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C., Turp, M. T., Ozturk, T. & Kurnaz, M. L. (2016). Impact of climate change on natural snow reliability, snowmaking capacities, and wind conditions of ski resorts in northeast Turkey: a dynamical downscaling approach. Atmosphere, 7(4), Article ID 52.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of climate change on natural snow reliability, snowmaking capacities, and wind conditions of ski resorts in northeast Turkey: a dynamical downscaling approach
2016 (English)In: Atmosphere, ISSN 2073-4433, E-ISSN 2073-4433, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many ski resorts worldwide are going through deteriorating snow cover conditions due to anthropogenic warming trends. As the natural and the artificially supported, i.e., technical, snow reliability of ski resorts diminish, the industry approaches a deadlock. For this reason, impact assessment studies have become vital for understanding vulnerability of ski tourism. This study considers three resorts at one of the rapidly emerging ski destinations, Northeast Turkey, for snow reliability analyses. Initially one global circulation model is dynamically downscaled by using the regional climate model RegCM4.4 for 1971-2000 and 2021-2050 periods along the RCP4.5 greenhouse gas concentration pathway. Next, the projected climate outputs are converted into indicators of natural snow reliability, snowmaking capacity, and wind conditions. The results show an overall decline in the frequencies of naturally snow reliable days and snowmaking capacities between the two periods. Despite the decrease, only the lower altitudes of one ski resort would face the risk of losing natural snow reliability and snowmaking could still compensate for forming the base layer before the critical New Year's week. On the other hand, adverse high wind conditions improve as to reduce the number of lift closure days at all resorts. Overall, this particular region seems to be relatively resilient against climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI AG, 2016
Keywords
climate change, RegCM4.4, snow reliability, snowmaking, ski tourism, Turkey
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139719 (URN)10.3390/atmos7040052 (DOI)000375211200004 ()
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C., Turp, M. T., Ozturk, T., An, N. & Kurnaz, M. L. (2016). Technical climate change adaptation options of the major ski resorts in Bulgaria. In: Boian Koulov and Georgi Zhelezov (Ed.), Sustainable mountain regions: challenges and perspectives in Southeastern Europe (pp. 77-88). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technical climate change adaptation options of the major ski resorts in Bulgaria
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2016 (English)In: Sustainable mountain regions: challenges and perspectives in Southeastern Europe / [ed] Boian Koulov and Georgi Zhelezov, Springer, 2016, p. 77-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Climate change has been and increasingly will be a major threat to the ski tourism industry, whose survival is highly dependent on the existence of snow cover of sufficient depth and duration. For this matter, it is even now more usual for the ski resorts to adapt to this issue by various measures at the technical, operational, and political levels. Technically speaking, snowmaking has become the method most used throughout the industry to combat the immediate impacts of climate change, while moving the ski areas to higher terrains has been standing out as an another option, wherever available and feasible. In this study, the aim is to project the future climatic changes in snowmaking capacity; in other words, technical snow reliability, and the moving requirements, if any, of the four major ski resorts in Bulgaria for the period of 2016–2030 with respect to the control period of 1991–2005. For this purpose, the past and the future climatic conditions for the technical snow reliability of the ski resorts and their immediate surroundings are determined by the temperature and the relative humidity values generated and projected through the Regional Climate Model RegCM 4.4 of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) by scaling the global climate model MPI-ESM-MR of Max Planck Institute for Meteorology down to a resolution of 10 km. The model is further processed according to the recent RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 concentration scenarios of the IPCC. The model outputs on air temperature and relative humidity are utilized for determination of wet-bulb temperatures through psychographic conversions that ultimately provide us with thresholds for snowmaking limits. Findings display the temporal changes in the snowmaking hours of the ski resorts at various altitudinal levels calculated according to the environmental lapse rates. Such displays can guide the practitioners in considering investment lives and moving the ski resorts according to optimistic and pessimistic projections.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Climate change, Climate modeling, Snowmaking, Ski area extension/expansion, Bulgaria
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152297 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-27905-3_6 (DOI)978-3-319-27905-3 (ISBN)978-3-319-27903-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Demiroglu, O. C., Kucerova, J. & Ozcelebi, O. (2015). Snow reliability and climate elasticity: case of a Slovak ski resort. Tourism Review, 70(1), 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Snow reliability and climate elasticity: case of a Slovak ski resort
2015 (English)In: Tourism Review, ISSN 1660-5373, E-ISSN 1759-8451, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Purpose – The aim of this paper is to present the relationship between climate and tourism development data as an example of an emerging winter and ski tourism destination in Slovakia. Design/methodology/approach – The method aims to discover the relationship through snow-reliability and regression analyses and to further implicate the consequences of such established relationship under a changing (warming) climate. Findings – As a result of the research, the authors can predict that a 1 per cent fall in snow depth and visibility would erode the ski demand by 1.2 and 0.12 per cent, respectively, a 1°C rise of the mean temperature, on the other hand, would indicate a 6 per cent loss of skipass sales. The latter finding translates into a further 6.6 to 19.2 per cent loss of sales on account of the anticipated temperature increases for the twenty-first century. The capacity of the resort for the utmost adaptation strategy, snowmaking, is also to deteriorate with the daytime/fulltime annual good quality production range to reduce from 33/45 days to 10-26/14-34 days, according to the emissions-related warming scenarios and in terms of the commonly available current technology. Practical implications – The results of the study can help the management of ski resorts to adopt strategies for the future development by taking into account the predicted climatic changes. Originality/value – This study is the first type of study performed in Slovakia and can contribute to the better understanding of the relationship between climate change and the performance of the ski tourism resorts. It also delivers innovation by considering wet-bulb temperature in snow-reliability analyses and also by coining the “climate elasticity” concept. Keywords Climate change, Climate elasticity, Cochrane-Orcutt procedure, Ski tourism, Slovakia, Snow reliability Paper type Case study

National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142589 (URN)10.1108/TR-01-2014-0003 (DOI)000216251300001 ()
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7012-4111

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