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Cisneros, David A.
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Muhar, M., Ebert, A., Neumann, T., Umkehrer, C., Jude, J., Wieshofer, C., . . . Zuber, J. (2018). SLAM-seq defines direct gene-regulatory functions of the BRD4-MYC axis. Science, 360(6390), 800-805
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SLAM-seq defines direct gene-regulatory functions of the BRD4-MYC axis
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2018 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 360, no 6390, p. 800-805Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Defining direct targets of transcription factors and regulatory pathways is key to understanding their roles in physiology and disease. We combined SLAM-seq [thiol(SH)-linked alkylation for the metabolic sequencing of RNA], a method for direct quantification of newly synthesized messenger RNAs (mRNAs), with pharmacological and chemical-genetic perturbation in order to define regulatory functions of two transcriptional hubs in cancer, BRD4 and MYC, and to interrogate direct responses to BET bromodomain inhibitors (BETis). We found that BRD4 acts as general coactivator of RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, which is broadly repressed upon high-dose BETi treatment. At doses triggering selective effects in leukemia, BETis deregulate a small set of hypersensitive targets including MYC. In contrast to BRD4, MYC primarily acts as a selective transcriptional activator controlling metabolic processes such as ribosome biogenesis and de novo purine synthesis. Our study establishes a simple and scalable strategy to identify direct transcriptional targets of any gene or pathway.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
molecular medicine (medical sciences)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156761 (URN)10.1126/science.aao2793 (DOI)29622725 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Wutz, G., Várnai, C., Nagasaka, K., Cisneros, D. A., Stocsits, R. R., Tang, W., . . . Peters, J.-M. (2017). Topologically associating domains and chromatin loops depend on cohesin and are regulated by CTCF, WAPL, and PDS5 proteins. EMBO Journal, 36(24), 3573-3599
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Topologically associating domains and chromatin loops depend on cohesin and are regulated by CTCF, WAPL, and PDS5 proteins
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2017 (English)In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 36, no 24, p. 3573-3599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mammalian genomes are spatially organized into compartments, topologically associating domains (TADs), and loops to facilitate gene regulation and other chromosomal functions. How compartments, TADs, and loops are generated is unknown. It has been proposed that cohesin forms TADs and loops by extruding chromatin loops until it encounters CTCF, but direct evidence for this hypothesis is missing. Here, we show that cohesin suppresses compartments but is required for TADs and loops, that CTCF defines their boundaries, and that the cohesin unloading factor WAPL and its PDS5 binding partners control the length of loops. In the absence of WAPL and PDS5 proteins, cohesin forms extended loops, presumably by passing CTCF sites, accumulates in axial chromosomal positions (vermicelli), and condenses chromosomes. Unexpectedly, PDS5 proteins are also required for boundary function. These results show that cohesin has an essential genome-wide function in mediating long-range chromatin interactions and support the hypothesis that cohesin creates these by loop extrusion, until it is delayed by CTCF in a manner dependent on PDS5 proteins, or until it is released from DNA by WAPL.

Keywords
chromatin condensation, chromatin structure, genome organization, loop extrusion, vermicelli
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156764 (URN)10.15252/embj.201798004 (DOI)29217591 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Davidson, I. F., Goetz, D., Zaczek, M. P., Molodtsov, M. I., in't Veld, P. J. H., Weissmann, F., . . . Peters, J.-M. (2016). Rapid movement and transcriptional re-localization of human cohesin on DNA. EMBO Journal, 35(24), 2671-2685
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid movement and transcriptional re-localization of human cohesin on DNA
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2016 (English)In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 35, no 24, p. 2671-2685Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spatial organization, correct expression, repair, and segregation of eukaryotic genomes depend on cohesin, ring-shaped protein complexes that are thought to function by entrapping DNA. It has been proposed that cohesin is recruited to specific genomic locations from distal loading sites by an unknown mechanism, which depends on transcription, and it has been speculated that cohesin movements along DNA could create three-dimensional genomic organization by loop extrusion. However, whether cohesin can translocate along DNA is unknown. Here, we used single-molecule imaging to show that cohesin can diffuse rapidly on DNA in a manner consistent with topological entrapment and can pass over some DNA-bound proteins and nucleosomes but is constrained in its movement by transcription and DNA-bound CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF). These results indicate that cohesin can be positioned in the genome by moving along DNA, that transcription can provide directionality to these movements, that CTCF functions as a boundary element for moving cohesin, and they are consistent with the hypothesis that cohesin spatially organizes the genome via loop extrusion.

Keywords
cell cycle, cohesin, genome organization, single-molecule TIRF microscopy, transcription
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130454 (URN)10.15252/embj.201695402 (DOI)000390948700008 ()27799150 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-24 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ladurner, R., Kreidl, E., Ivanov, M. P., Ekker, H., Idarraga-Amado, M. H., Busslinger, G. A., . . . Peters, J.-M. (2016). Sororin actively maintains sister chromatid cohesion. EMBO Journal, 35(6), 635-653
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sororin actively maintains sister chromatid cohesion
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2016 (English)In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 635-653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cohesion between sister chromatids is established during DNA replication but needs to be maintained to enable proper chromosome-spindle attachments in mitosis or meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by cohesin, but also depends on cohesin acetylation and sororin. Sororin contributes to cohesion by stabilizing cohesin on DNA. Sororin achieves this by inhibiting WAPL, which otherwise releases cohesin from DNA and destroys cohesion. Here we describe mouse models which enable the controlled depletion of sororin by gene deletion or auxin-induced degradation. We show that sororin is essential for embryonic development, cohesion maintenance, and proper chromosome segregation. We further show that the acetyltransferases ESCO1 and ESCO2 are essential for stabilizing cohesin on chromatin, that their only function in this process is to acetylate cohesin's SMC3 subunit, and that DNA replication is also required for stable cohesin-chromatin interactions. Unexpectedly, we find that sororin interacts dynamically with the cohesin complexes it stabilizes. This implies that sororin recruitment to cohesin does not depend on the DNA replication machinery or process itself, but on a property that cohesin acquires during cohesion establishment.

Keywords
cell cycle, cohesin acetylation, mitosis, sister chromatid cohesion
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156766 (URN)10.15252/embj.201592532 (DOI)26903600 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Amorim, G. C., Cisneros, D. A., Delepierre, M., Francetic, O. & Izadi-Pruneyre, N. (2014). ¹H, ¹⁵N and ¹³C resonance assignments of PpdD, a type IV pilin from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Biomolecular NMR Assignments, 8(1), 43-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>¹H, ¹⁵N and ¹³C resonance assignments of PpdD, a type IV pilin from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
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2014 (English)In: Biomolecular NMR Assignments, ISSN 1874-2718, E-ISSN 1874-270X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 43-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bacterial type 4 pili (T4P) are long flexible fibers involved in adhesion, DNA uptake, phage transduction, aggregation and a flagella-independent movement called "twitching motility". T4P comprise thousands of copies of the major pilin subunit, which is initially inserted in the plasma membrane, processed and assembled into dynamic helical filaments. T4P are crucial for host colonization and virulence of many Gram-negative bacteria. In enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli the T4P, called hemorrhagic coli pili (HCP) promote cell adhesion, motility, biofilm formation and signaling. To understand the mechanism of HCP assembly and function, we analyzed the structure of the major subunit prepilin peptidase-dependent protein D (PpdD) (also called HcpA), a 15 kDa pilin with two potential disulfide bonds. Here we present the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the C-terminal globular domain of PpdD as a first step to its structural determination.

National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156769 (URN)10.1007/s12104-012-9449-z (DOI)23242787 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Campos, M., Cisneros, D. A., Nivaskumar, M. & Francetic, O. (2013). The type II secretion system: a dynamic fiber assembly nanomachine. Research in Microbiology, 164(6), 545-555
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The type II secretion system: a dynamic fiber assembly nanomachine
2013 (English)In: Research in Microbiology, ISSN 0923-2508, E-ISSN 1769-7123, Vol. 164, no 6, p. 545-555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Type II secretion systems (T2SSs) share common origins and structure with archaeal flagella (archaella) and pili, bacterial competence systems and type IV pili. All of these systems use a conserved ATP-powered machinery to assemble helical fibers that are anchored in the plasma membrane. The T2SSs assemble pseudopili, periplasmic filaments that promote extracellular secretion of folded periplasmic proteins. Comparative analysis of T2SSs and related fiber assembly nanomachines might provide important clues on their functional specificities and dynamics. This review focuses on recent developments in the study of pseudopilus structure and biogenesis, and discusses mechanistic models of pseudopilus function in protein secretion.

Keywords
Pilus assembly, Pseudopilins, Type II protein secretion, Type IV pili
National Category
Microbiology Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156768 (URN)10.1016/j.resmic.2013.03.013 (DOI)23542426 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Tedeschi, A., Wutz, G., Huet, S., Jaritz, M., Wuensche, A., Schirghuber, E., . . . Peters, J.-M. (2013). Wapl is an essential regulator of chromatin structure and chromosome segregation [Letter to the editor]. Nature, 501(7468), 564-568
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wapl is an essential regulator of chromatin structure and chromosome segregation
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2013 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 501, no 7468, p. 564-568Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mammalian genomes contain several billion base pairs of DNA that are packaged in chromatin fibres. At selected gene loci, cohesin complexes have been proposed to arrange these fibres into higher-order structures, but how important this function is for determining overall chromosome architecture and how the process is regulated are not well understood. Using conditional mutagenesis in the mouse, here we show that depletion of the cohesin-associated protein Wapl stably locks cohesin on DNA, leads to clustering of cohesin in axial structures, and causes chromatin condensation in interphase chromosomes. These findings reveal that the stability of cohesin-DNA interactions is an important determinant of chromatin structure, and indicate that cohesin has an architectural role in interphase chromosome territories. Furthermore, we show that regulation of cohesin-DNA interactions by Wapl is important for embryonic development, expression of genes such as c-myc (also known as Myc), and cell cycle progression. In mitosis, Wapl-mediated release of cohesin from DNA is essential for proper chromosome segregation and protects cohesin from cleavage by the protease separase, thus enabling mitotic exit in the presence of functional cohesin complexes.

National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156767 (URN)10.1038/nature12471 (DOI)23975099 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Cisneros, D. A., Pehau-Arnaudet, G. & Francetic, O. (2012). Heterologous assembly of type IV pili by a type II secretion system reveals the role of minor pilins in assembly initiation. Molecular Microbiology, 86(4), 805-818
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heterologous assembly of type IV pili by a type II secretion system reveals the role of minor pilins in assembly initiation
2012 (English)In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 805-818Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Gram-negative bacteria, type IV pilus assembly (T4PS) and type II secretion (T2SS) systems polymerize inner membrane proteins called major pilins or pseudopilins respectively, into thin filaments. Four minor pilins are required in both systems for efficient fibre assembly. Escherichia coli K-12 has a set of T4PS assembly genes that are silent under standard growth conditions. We studied the heterologous assembly of the E. coli type IV pilin PpdD by the Klebsiella oxytoca T2SS called the Pul system. PpdD pilus assembly in this context depended on the expression of the K. oxytoca minor pseudopilin genes pulHIJK or of the E. coli minor pilin genes ppdAB-ygdB-ppdC. The E. coli minor pilins restored assembly of the major pseudopilin PulG in a pulHIJK mutant, but not the secretion of the T2SS substrate pullulanase. Thus, minor pilins and minor pseudopilins are functionally interchangeable in initiating major pilin assembly, further extending the fundamental similarities between the two systems. The data suggest that, in both systems, minor pilins activate the assembly machinery through a common self-assembly mechanism. When produced together, PulG and PpdD assembled into distinct homopolymers, establishing major pilins as key determinants of pilus elongation and structure.

National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156770 (URN)10.1111/mmi.12033 (DOI)23006128 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Cisneros, D. A., Bond, P. J., Pugsley, A. P., Campos, M. & Francetic, O. (2012). Minor pseudopilin self-assembly primes type II secretion pseudopilus elongation. EMBO Journal, 31(4), 1041-1053
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Minor pseudopilin self-assembly primes type II secretion pseudopilus elongation
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2012 (English)In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1041-1053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Gram-negative bacteria, type II secretion systems (T2SS) assemble inner membrane proteins of the major pseudopilin PulG (GspG) family into periplasmic filaments, which could drive protein secretion in a piston-like manner. Three minor pseudopilins PulI, PulJ and PulK are essential for protein secretion in the Klebsiella oxytoca T2SS, but their molecular function is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that together these proteins prime pseudopilus assembly, without actively controlling its length or secretin channel opening. Using molecular dynamics, bacterial two-hybrid assays, cysteine crosslinking and functional analysis, we show that PulI and PulJ nucleate filament assembly by forming a staggered complex in the plasma membrane. Binding of PulK to this complex results in its partial extraction from the membrane and in a 1-nm shift between their transmembrane segments, equivalent to the major pseudopilin register in the assembled PulG filament. This promotes fully efficient pseudopilus assembly and protein secretion. Therefore, we propose that PulI, PulJ and PulK self-assembly is thermodynamically coupled to the initiation of pseudopilus assembly, possibly setting the assembly machinery in motion.

National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156771 (URN)10.1038/emboj.2011.454 (DOI)22157749 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Campos, M., Nilges, M., Cisneros, D. A. & Francetic, O. (2010). Detailed structural and assembly model of the type II secretion pilus from sparse data. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107(29), 13081-13086
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detailed structural and assembly model of the type II secretion pilus from sparse data
2010 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 107, no 29, p. 13081-13086Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many gram-negative bacteria secrete specific proteins via the type II secretion systems (T2SS). These complex machineries share with the related archaeal flagella and type IV pilus (T4P) biogenesis systems the ability to assemble thin, flexible filaments composed of small, initially inner membrane-localized proteins called "pilins." In the T2SS from Klebsiella oxytoca, periplasmic pseudopili that are essential for pullulanase (PulA) secretion extend beyond the bacterial surface and form pili when the major pilin PulG is overproduced. Here, we describe the detailed, experimentally validated structure of the PulG pilus generated from crystallographic and electron microscopy data by a molecular modeling approach. Two intermolecular salt bridges crucial for function were demonstrated using single and complementary charge inversions. Double-cysteine substitutions in the transmembrane segment of PulG led to position-specific cross-linking of protomers in assembled pili. These biochemical data provided information on residue distances in the filament that were used to derive a refined model of the T2SS pilus at pseudoatomic resolution. PulG is organized as a right-handed helix of subunits, consistent with protomer organization in gonococcal T4P. The conserved character of residues involved in key hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions within the major pseudopilin family supports the general relevance of this model for T2SS pseudopilus structure.

National Category
Infectious Medicine Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156772 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1001703107 (DOI)20616068 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
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