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Landberg, Rikard
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Schillemans, T., Yan, Y., Ribbenstedt, A., Donat-Vargas, C., Lindh, C. H., Kiviranta, H., . . . Brunius, C. (2024). Omics signatures linking persistent organic pollutants to cardiovascular disease in the Swedish mammography cohort. Environmental Science and Technology, 58(2), 1036-1047
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Omics signatures linking persistent organic pollutants to cardiovascular disease in the Swedish mammography cohort
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2024 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 1036-1047Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) development may be linked to persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including organochlorine compounds (OCs) and perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). To explore underlying mechanisms, we investigated metabolites, proteins, and genes linking POPs with CVD risk. We used data from a nested case-control study on myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke from the Swedish Mammography Cohort - Clinical (n = 657 subjects). OCs, PFAS, and multiomics (9511 liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolite features; 248 proteins; 8110 gene variants) were measured in baseline plasma. POP-related omics features were selected using random forest followed by Spearman correlation adjusted for confounders. From these, CVD-related omics features were selected using conditional logistic regression. Finally, 29 (for OCs) and 12 (for PFAS) unique features associated with POPs and CVD. One omics subpattern, driven by lipids and inflammatory proteins, associated with MI (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.47; 2.79), OCs, age, and BMI, and correlated negatively with PFAS. Another subpattern, driven by carnitines, associated with stroke (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 1.16; 2.09), OCs, and age, but not with PFAS. This may imply that OCs and PFAS associate with different omics patterns with opposite effects on CVD risk, but more research is needed to disentangle potential modifications by other factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2024
Keywords
cardiovascular disease, genetics, metabolomics, multiomics, nested case-control study, persistent organic pollutants, proteomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-220017 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.3c06388 (DOI)001143994800001 ()38174696 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182599336 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00644Swedish Research Council, 2017-06100Swedish Research Council, 2018-05973Swedish Research Council, 2022-00980SIMPLEROlle Engkvists stiftelseSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC)Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01653
Available from: 2024-01-30 Created: 2024-01-30 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Schillemans, T., Bergdahl, I., Hanhineva, K., Shi, L., Donat-Vargas, C., Koponen, J., . . . Brunius, C. (2023). Associations of PFAS-related plasma metabolites with cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Environmental Research, 216, Article ID 114570.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations of PFAS-related plasma metabolites with cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 216, article id 114570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The wide-spread environmental pollutants per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have repeatedly been associated with elevated serum cholesterol in humans. However, underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, we have previously observed inverse associations with plasma triglycerides. To better understand PFAS-induced effects on lipid pathways we investigated associations of PFAS-related metabolite features with plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. We used 290 PFAS-related metabolite features that we previously discovered from untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectometry metabolomics in a case-control study within the Swedish Västerbotten Intervention Programme cohort. Herein, we studied associations of these PFAS-related metabolite features with plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in plasma samples from 187 healthy control subjects collected on two occasions between 1991 and 2013. The PFAS-related features did not associate with cholesterol, but 50 features were associated with triglycerides. Principal component analysis on these features indicated that one metabolite pattern, dominated by glycerophospholipids, correlated with longer chain PFAS and associated inversely with triglycerides (both cross-sectionally and prospectively), after adjustment for confounders. The observed time-trend of the metabolite pattern resembled that of the longer chain PFAS, with higher levels during the years 2004-2010. Mechanisms linking PFAS exposures to triglycerides may thus occur via longer chain PFAS affecting glycerophospholipid metabolism. If the results reflect a cause-effect association, as implied by the time-trend and prospective analyses, this may affect the general adult population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Cholesterol, HBM4EU, Metabolomics, Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, Triglycerides
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200731 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2022.114570 (DOI)000901257900002 ()36243049 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139821796 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-05973Swedish Research Council, 2017-00650Swedish Research Council, 2017-00822Swedish Research Council, 2017-05840Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-00314Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01653Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0758Dr P Håkanssons stiftelseEU, Horizon 2020, 733032
Available from: 2022-11-03 Created: 2022-11-03 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Palmnäs-Bédard, M., de Santa Izabel, A., Dicksved, J. & Landberg, R. (2023). Characterization of the Bacterial Composition of 47 Fermented Foods in Sweden. Foods, 12(20), Article ID 3827.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of the Bacterial Composition of 47 Fermented Foods in Sweden
2023 (English)In: Foods, E-ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 12, no 20, article id 3827Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fermentation has long been utilized to preserve and enhance the flavor and nutritional value of foods. Recently, fermented foods have gained popularity, reaching new consumer groups due to perceived health benefits. However, the microbial composition of many fermented foods re-mains unknown. Here, we characterized the bacterial composition, diversity, and richness of 47 fermented foods available in Sweden, including kombucha, water kefir, milk kefir, yogurt, plant-based yogurt alternatives, kimchi, sauerkraut, and fermented vegetables. Via 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we identified 2497 bacteria (amplicon sequence variants). The bacterial composition was strongly associated with the type of fermented food, and lactic acid bacteria and/or acetic acid bacteria dominated most samples. However, each fermented food had a unique composition, with kombucha and water kefir having the highest diversity across and within samples. Few bacteria were abundant in multiple foods and food groups. These were Streptococcus thermophilus in yogurts and plant-based yoghurts; Lactococcus lactis in milk kefirs and one water kefir; and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum in kimchi, sauerkraut, and fermented cucumber. The broad range of fermented foods included in this study and their diverse bacterial communities warrant further investigation into the implications of microbial compositions for product traits and potential impact on human health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
bacterial composition, fermented beverages, fermented foods, microbiota
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-216167 (URN)10.3390/foods12203827 (DOI)001089483000001 ()37893721 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175206699 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-02193
Available from: 2023-11-10 Created: 2023-11-10 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Nordin, E., Steffensen, S. K., Laursen, B. B., Andersson, S.-O., Johansson, J.-E., Åman, P., . . . Landberg, R. (2022). An inverse association between plasma benzoxazinoid metabolites and PSA after rye intake in men with prostate cancer revealed with a new method. Scientific Reports, 12(1), Article ID 5260.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An inverse association between plasma benzoxazinoid metabolites and PSA after rye intake in men with prostate cancer revealed with a new method
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2022 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 5260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prostate cancer (PC) is a common cancer among men, and preventive strategies are warranted. Benzoxazinoids (BXs) in rye have shown potential against PC in vitro but human studies are lacking. The aim was to establish a quantitative method for analysis of BXs and investigate their plasma levels after a whole grain/bran rye vs refined wheat intervention, as well as exploring their association with PSA, in men with PC. A quantitative method for analysis of 22 BXs, including novel metabolites identified by mass spectrometry and NMR, was established, and applied to plasma samples from a randomized crossover study where patients with indolent PC (n = 17) consumed 485 g whole grain rye/rye bran or fiber supplemented refined wheat daily for 6 wk. Most BXs were significantly higher in plasma after rye (0.3–19.4 nmol/L in plasma) vs. refined wheat (0.05–2.9 nmol/L) intake. HBOA-glc, 2-HHPAA, HBOA-glcA, 2-HPAA-glcA were inversely correlated to PSA in plasma (p < 0.04). To conclude, BXs in plasma, including metabolites not previously analyzed, were quantified. BX metabolites were significantly higher after rye vs refined wheat consumption. Four BX-related metabolites were inversely associated with PSA, which merits further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2022
National Category
Food Science Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-193683 (URN)10.1038/s41598-022-08856-z (DOI)000774204500041 ()35347164 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127262251 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05840Academy of Finland, 321716EU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2022-05-03 Created: 2022-05-03 Last updated: 2023-05-24Bibliographically approved
Mhd Omar, N. A., Dicksved, J., Kruger, J., Zamaratskaia, G., Michaëlsson, K., Wolk, A., . . . Landberg, R. (2022). Effect of a diet rich in galactose or fructose, with or without fructooligosaccharides, on gut microbiota composition in rats. Frontiers in Nutrition, 9, Article ID 922336.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of a diet rich in galactose or fructose, with or without fructooligosaccharides, on gut microbiota composition in rats
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Nutrition, E-ISSN 2296-861X, Vol. 9, article id 922336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent studies suggest that a diet rich in sugars significantly affects the gut microbiota. Adverse metabolic effects of sugars may partly be mediated by alterations of gut microbiota and gut health parameters, but experimental evidence is lacking. Therefore, we investigated the effects of high intake of fructose or galactose, with/without fructooligosaccharides (FOS), on gut microbiota composition in rats and explored the association between gut microbiota and low-grade systemic inflammation. Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 6/group) were fed the following isocaloric diets for 12 weeks (% of the dry weight of the sugars or FOS): (1) starch (control), (2) fructose (50%), (3) galactose (50%), (4) starch+FOS (15%) (FOS control), (5) fructose (50%)+FOS (15%), (6) galactose (50%)+FOS (15%), and (7) starch+olive (negative control). Microbiota composition in the large intestinal content was determined by sequencing amplicons from the 16S rRNA gene; 341F and 805R primers were used to generate amplicons from the V3 and V4 regions. Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes, and Cyanobacteria composition differed between diets. Bifidobacterium was significantly higher in all diet groups where FOS was included. Modest associations between gut microbiota and metabolic factors as well as with gut permeability markers were observed, but no associations between gut microbiota and inflammation markers were observed. We found no coherent effect of galactose or fructose on gut microbiota composition. Added FOS increased Bifidobacterium but did not mitigate potential adverse metabolic effects induced by the sugars. However, gut microbiota composition was associated with several metabolic factors and gut permeability markers which warrant further investigations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
16S rRNA, fructooligosaccharides, fructose, galactose, gut microbiota
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-199198 (URN)10.3389/fnut.2022.922336 (DOI)000844961200001 ()36034892 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136816603 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-003114EU, Horizon 2020, 727565Swedish Research Council, 2017-05840
Available from: 2022-09-09 Created: 2022-09-09 Last updated: 2022-09-09Bibliographically approved
Palmnäs-Bedard, M. S. A., Costabile, G., Vetrani, C., Åberg, S., Hjalmarsson, Y., Dicksved, J., . . . Landberg, R. (2022). The human gut microbiota and glucose metabolism: a scoping review of key bacteria and the potential role of SCFAs. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 116(4), 862-874
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The human gut microbiota and glucose metabolism: a scoping review of key bacteria and the potential role of SCFAs
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2022 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 862-874Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The gut microbiota plays a fundamental role in human nutrition and metabolism and may have direct implications for type 2 diabetes and associated preconditions. An improved understanding of relations between human gut microbiota and glucose metabolism could lead to novel opportunities for type 2 diabetes prevention, but human observational studies reporting on such findings have not been extensively reviewed. Here, we review the literature on associations between gut microbiota and markers and stages of glucose dysregulation and insulin resistance in healthy adults and in adults with metabolic disease and risk factors. We present the current evidence for identified key bacteria and their potential roles in glucose metabolism independent of overweight, obesity, and metabolic drugs. We provide support for SCFAs mediating such effects and discuss the role of diet, as well as metabolites derived from diet and gut microbiota interactions. From 5983 initially identified PubMed records, 45 original studies were eligible and reviewed. α Diversity and 45 bacterial taxa were associated with selected outcomes. Six taxa were most frequently associated with glucose metabolism: Akkermansia muciniphila, Bifidobacterium longum, Clostridium leptum group, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, and Faecalibacterium (inversely associated) and Dorea (directly associated). For Dorea and A. muciniphila, associations were independent of metabolic drugs and body measures. For A. muciniphila and F. prausnitzii, limited evidence supported SCFA mediation of potential effects on glucose metabolism. We conclude that observational studies applying metagenomics sequencing to identify species-level relations are warranted, as are studies accounting for confounding factors and investigating SCFA and postprandial glucose metabolism. Such advances in the field will, together with mechanistic and prospective studies and investigations into diet-gut microbiota interactions, have the potential to bring critical insight into roles of gut microbiota and microbial metabolites in human glucose metabolism and to contribute toward the development of novel prevention strategies for type 2 diabetes, including precision nutrition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2022
Keywords
diet-gut microbiota interactions, glucose metabolism, gut microbiota, humans, insulin resistance, microbial metabolites, precision nutrition, prediabetes, short-chain fatty acids, type 2 diabetes prevention
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-202247 (URN)10.1093/ajcn/nqac217 (DOI)000853177600001 ()36026526 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144792680 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Food4GutMarKIT
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019-04639Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-02003Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01113EU, Horizon 2020, 727565Swedish Research Council, 2019-01264
Available from: 2023-01-09 Created: 2023-01-09 Last updated: 2023-05-25Bibliographically approved
Bergh, C., Landberg, R., Andersson, K., Heyman-Lindén, L., Rascón, A., Magnuson, A., . . . Fröbert, O. (2021). Effects of Bilberry and Oat intake on lipids, inflammation and exercise capacity after Acute Myocardial Infarction (BIOAMI): study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Trials, 22(1), Article ID 338.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Bilberry and Oat intake on lipids, inflammation and exercise capacity after Acute Myocardial Infarction (BIOAMI): study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
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2021 (English)In: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bilberries from Sweden, rich in polyphenols, have shown cholesterol-lowering effects in small studies, and the cholesterol-lowering properties of oats, with abundant beta-glucans and potentially bioactive phytochemicals, are well established. Both may provide cardiometabolic benefits following acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but large studies of adequate statistical power and appropriate duration are needed to confirm clinically relevant treatment effects. No previous study has evaluated the potential additive or synergistic effects of bilberry combined with oats on cardiometabolic risk factors. Our primary objective is to assess cardioprotective effects of diet supplementation with dried bilberry or with bioprocessed oat bran, with a secondary explorative objective of assessing their combination, compared with a neutral isocaloric reference supplement, initiated within 5 days following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for AMI.

Methods: The effects of Bilberry and Oat intake on lipids, inflammation and exercise capacity after Acute Myocardial Infarction (BIOAMI) trial is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. A total of 900 patients will be randomized post-PCI to one of four dietary intervention arms. After randomization, subjects will receive beverages with bilberry powder (active), beverages with high-fiber bioprocessed oat bran (active), beverages with bilberry and oats combined (active), or reference beverages containing no active bilberry or active oats, for consumption twice daily during a 3-month intervention. The primary endpoint is the difference in LDL cholesterol change between the intervention groups after 3 months. The major secondary endpoint is exercise capacity at 3 months. Other secondary endpoints include plasma concentrations of biochemical markers of inflammation, metabolomics, and gut microbiota composition after 3 months.

Discussion: Controlling hyperlipidemia and inflammation is critical to preventing new cardiovascular events, but novel pharmacological treatments for these conditions are expensive and associated with negative side effects. If bilberry and/or oat, in addition to standard medical therapy, can lower LDL cholesterol and inflammation more than standard therapy alone, this could be a cost-effective and safe dietary strategy for secondary prevention after AMI.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03620266. Registered on August 8, 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021
Keywords
Anthocyanin, Anthocyanin-derived phenolic acid metabolites, Bilberry, Cholesterol, Diet therapy, Exercise test, Inflammation, Myocardial infarction
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-183498 (URN)10.1186/s13063-021-05287-5 (DOI)000656444300006 ()2-s2.0-85105547201 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20190102Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20190513
Available from: 2021-05-26 Created: 2021-05-26 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mhd Omar, N. A., Frank, J., Kruger, J., Dal Bello, F., Medana, C., Collino, M., . . . Landberg, R. (2021). Effects of High Intakes of Fructose and Galactose, with or without Added Fructooligosaccharides, on Metabolic Factors, Inflammation, and Gut Integrity in a Rat Model. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 65(6), Article ID 2001133.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of High Intakes of Fructose and Galactose, with or without Added Fructooligosaccharides, on Metabolic Factors, Inflammation, and Gut Integrity in a Rat Model
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2021 (English)In: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, ISSN 1613-4125, E-ISSN 1613-4133, Vol. 65, no 6, article id 2001133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scope: A high fructose and galactose intake show adverse metabolic effects in animal models and in humans, but it is yet unknown if addition of fermentable dietary fiber can mitigate such effects. This study investigate the effects of high intakes of fructose and galactose, with/without added fructooligosaccharides (FOS), on metabolic factors, inflammation, and gut integrity markers in rats.

Methods and Results: Rats (n = 6/group) receive different carbohydrates at isocaloric conditions for 12 weeks as follows: 1) starch (control), 2) fructose, 3) galactose, 4) starch + FOS (FOS control), 5) fructose + FOS, and 6) galactose + FOS, together with a high amount of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFA) in all diets except for in 7) starch + olive oil (negative control). The rats fed the galactose and galactose + FOS diets exhibit lower body weight than other groups. High-galactose diets has more pronounced effects on metabolic factors and gut permeability than high-fructose diets. High-fructose diets show less pronounced effect on these selected markers. No differences in inflammatory markers are detected for any of the diets.

Conclusions: The results suggest potential adverse effects of high galactose and fructose on metabolic factors and gut integrity markers, but not on inflammation. However, several mechanisms are at play, and general net effects are difficult to determine conclusively for the conditions tested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
fructooligosaccharides, fructose, galactose, gut integrity, inflammatory markers
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181543 (URN)10.1002/mnfr.202001133 (DOI)000621422400001 ()2-s2.0-85101517487 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-31 Created: 2021-03-31 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Gotfredsen, J. L., Hoppe, C., Andersen, R., Andersen, E. W., Landberg, R., Overvad, K. & Tetens, I. (2021). Effects of substitution dietary guidelines targeted at prevention of ischemic heart disease on dietary intake and risk factors in middle-aged Danish adults: The DIPI randomized controlled trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 126(8), 1179-1193
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of substitution dietary guidelines targeted at prevention of ischemic heart disease on dietary intake and risk factors in middle-aged Danish adults: The DIPI randomized controlled trial
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2021 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 126, no 8, p. 1179-1193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective was to investigate the effects of substitution (SUB) dietary guidelines (DG) targeted at prevention of ischemic heart disease (IHD) on dietary intake and IHD risk factors in Danish adults with minimum one self-assessed IHD risk factor. A 6-month single-blinded parallel randomised controlled trial with a follow-up at month 12 included 219 subjects (median age 51 years, 59% female, 73 % overweight or obese) randomised into a SUB DG, an official (OFF) DG or a control group following their habitual diet (HAB). Participants in the DG intervention groups received bi-weekly reminders of their DG and recipes for dishes and the HAB group received a greeting. Dietary intake and fasting blood, anthropometric, and blood pressure measurements were obtained at baseline, month 6 and month 12. Linear regression analyses were applied. At month 6, when compared with the HAB, the SUB had a greater impact on the extent of dietary changes with increased intake of whole grains, dietary fibre, and low fibre vegetables compared with the OFF DG and both DG groups had similar decreased percentage of energy (E%) intake from saturated fatty acids. The extent of dietary changes were similar at month 12. No overall significant changes from baseline were found in blood pressure (BP), anthropometrics and IHD risk markers. In conclusion, both SUB and OFF DG resulted in cardioprotective dietary changes. However, neither the SUB nor the OFF DG resulted in any overall effects on the selected intermediate risk factors for IHD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2021
Keywords
Food-Based Dietary Guidelines, Web-based dietary assessment, Whole grain biomarker, Whole grain intake
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186156 (URN)10.1017/S0007114520005164 (DOI)000695949200009 ()33357247 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85098700743 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-16 Created: 2021-07-16 Last updated: 2022-05-03Bibliographically approved
Omar, N. A., Wu, H., Larsson, A., Wolk, A. & Landberg, R. (2021). Long-term whole-grain rye and wheat consumption and their associations with selected biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial function, and cardiovascular disease. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 75(1), 123-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term whole-grain rye and wheat consumption and their associations with selected biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial function, and cardiovascular disease
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2021 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 123-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/objectives Whole-grain (WG) intake has been associated with a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers in epidemiological studies. Reduced subclinical inflammation could be one important mechanism behind such associations. This study investigated whether high long-term WG rye and wheat intakes were associated with lower concentrations of biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial function, and protein biomarkers associated with cardiovascular disease.

Subjects/methods: We assessed WG intake by food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and by measuring alkylresorcinols (ARs) in plasma and adipose tissue, respectively. Selected biomarkers in free-living 109 women and 149 men were analyzed from two clinical subcohort studies (Swedish Mammography Cohort-Clinical (SMC-C) and Cohort of Swedish Men-Clinical (COSM-C), respectively. Total WG rye and wheat (WGRnW) and the ratio of WG rye to WG rye and wheat (WGR/WGRnW) were estimated from FFQs. ARs were measured in plasma and adipose tissue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and the biomarkers by ELISA.

Results: We found no consistent associations between WG intake assessed by different methods and the selected biomarkers. However, WGRnW intake was inversely associated with cathepsin S (P-trend < 0.05) and total AR and C17:0/C21:0 in plasma were inversely associated with the endostatin concentration (P-trend < 0.05) adjusted for BMI, age, and sex.

Conclusion: The results give limited support to the hypothesis that a high WG wheat and rye intake is associated with lower concentrations of common biomarkers of inflammation and CVD that have previously been reported inversely associated with WG intake or an overall healthy lifestyle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2021
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174942 (URN)10.1038/s41430-020-00714-3 (DOI)000559637200001 ()32782386 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85089291464 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00644, 2017-05840Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-520, 2019-02200
Available from: 2020-09-22 Created: 2020-09-22 Last updated: 2021-07-06Bibliographically approved
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