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Lönngren, Johanna, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9667-2044
Publications (10 of 50) Show all publications
Lönngren, J., Bellocchi, A., Berge, M., Bøgelund, P., Direito, I., Huff, J. L., . . . Tormey, R. (2024). Emotions in engineering education: a configurative meta-synthesis systematic review. Journal of Engineering Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotions in engineering education: a configurative meta-synthesis systematic review
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 1069-4730, E-ISSN 1524-4873Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: The study of emotions in engineering education (EEE) has increased in recent years, but this emerging, multidisciplinary body of research is dispersed and not well consolidated. This paper reports on the first systematic review of EEE research and scholarship. Purpose: The review aimed to critically assess how researchers and scholars in engineering education have conceptualized emotions and how those conceptualizations have been used to frame and conduct EEE research and scholarship.

Scope/Method: The systematic review followed the procedures of a configurative meta-synthesis, mapping emotion theories and concepts, research purposes and methods, and citation patterns in the EEE literature. The review proceeded through five stages: (i) scoping and database searching; (ii) abstract screening, full text sifting, and full text review; (iii) pearling; (iv) scoping review, and (v) in-depth analysis for the meta-synthesis review. Two hundred and thirteen publications were included in the final analysis.

Results: The results show that the EEE literature has not extensively engaged with the wide range of conceptualizations of emotion available in the educational, psychological, and sociological literature. Further, the focus on emotion often seems to have been unintentional and of secondary importance in studies whose primary goals were to study other phenomena.

Conclusions: More research adopting intentional, theorized approaches to emotions will be crucial in further developing the field. To do justice to complex emotional phenomena in teaching and learning, future EEE research will also need to engage a broader range of conceptualizations of emotion and research methods, drawing on diverse disciplinary traditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
configurative review, emotion, emotional intelligence, engineering education, meta-synthesis, systematic review
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-224916 (URN)10.1002/jee.20600 (DOI)001222736900001 ()2-s2.0-85192948887 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Umeå University, FS2.1.6-1795-19Umeå University, FS 1.1-1294-15Swedish Research Council, 2020-0390
Available from: 2024-05-27 Created: 2024-05-27 Last updated: 2024-05-27
Lönngren, J., Direito, I., Tormey, R. & Huff, J. (2023). Emotions in engineering education (1ed.). In: Aditya Johri (Ed.), International handbook of engineering education research: (pp. 156-182). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotions in engineering education
2023 (English)In: International handbook of engineering education research / [ed] Aditya Johri, New York: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 156-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2023 Edition: 1
Keywords
emotion, engineering education
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218346 (URN)10.4324/9781003287483-10 (DOI)978-1-032-26276-5 (ISBN)978-1-032-26275-8 (ISBN)978-1-003-28748-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Griffith, J. A., Jalali, Y., Kálmán, A., Kövesi, K., Langie, G., Lönngren, J., . . . Polmear, M. (2023). Future perspectives of capacity building in engineering education. In: Ger Reilly; Mike Murphy, Balázs Vince Nagy; Hannu-Matti Järvinen (Ed.), Book of Proceedings for the 51st Annual Conference of the European Society for Engineering Education: Engineering Education for Sustainability. Paper presented at SEFI 2023, 51st Annual conference of the European Society for Engineering Education, Dublin, UK, September 11-14, 2023 (pp. 3152-3157). Dublin: TU Dublin; SEFI
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future perspectives of capacity building in engineering education
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2023 (English)In: Book of Proceedings for the 51st Annual Conference of the European Society for Engineering Education: Engineering Education for Sustainability / [ed] Ger Reilly; Mike Murphy, Balázs Vince Nagy; Hannu-Matti Järvinen, Dublin: TU Dublin; SEFI , 2023, p. 3152-3157Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dublin: TU Dublin; SEFI, 2023
Keywords
capacity building, higher education, engineering education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218334 (URN)10.21427/MPV8-5862 (DOI)2-s2.0-85180093645 (Scopus ID)9782873520267 (ISBN)
Conference
SEFI 2023, 51st Annual conference of the European Society for Engineering Education, Dublin, UK, September 11-14, 2023
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
Berge, M. & Lönngren, J. (2023). I skämten döljs framtidens ingenjör. In: : . Paper presented at FemHum symposium: Humor på allvar, Online, 4-5 december, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I skämten döljs framtidens ingenjör
2023 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Humor
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217483 (URN)
Conference
FemHum symposium: Humor på allvar, Online, 4-5 december, 2023
Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2023-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lönngren, J. (2023). Komplekse utfordringer krever nye løsninger. In: Asbjørn Rolstadås; Helge Bratebø, Annik Magerholm Fet; Arne Krokan; Gunnar Sand; Henrik Syse; Tor Inge Waag; Geir Egil Dahle Øien (Ed.), Bærekraft og digitalisering: (pp. 49-58). Trondheim: Norges Tekniske Vitenskapsakademi; John Grieg Forlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Komplekse utfordringer krever nye løsninger
2023 (Norwegian)In: Bærekraft og digitalisering / [ed] Asbjørn Rolstadås; Helge Bratebø, Annik Magerholm Fet; Arne Krokan; Gunnar Sand; Henrik Syse; Tor Inge Waag; Geir Egil Dahle Øien, Trondheim: Norges Tekniske Vitenskapsakademi; John Grieg Forlag , 2023, p. 49-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [no]

Hvordan kan vi forberede fremtidige ingeniører på å håndtere komplekse, omstridte og ofte eksistensielle bærekraftutfordringer? Utdanning for bærekraftig utvikling (UBU) har som mål å gi studenter den kunnskapen, kompetansen og den påvirkningen de trenger for å håndtere sammenkoblede, globale bærekraftutfordringer som klimaendring, tap av biologisk mangfold, ulikheter og globale helsekriser.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim: Norges Tekniske Vitenskapsakademi; John Grieg Forlag, 2023
Keywords
education for sustainable development, engineering education
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218350 (URN)978-82-533-0415-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Lönngren, J., Berge, M. & Holmén, J. (2023). Learning for an unknown future: emotional positioning in and for expansive learning. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2023, European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning for an unknown future: emotional positioning in and for expansive learning
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

STUDY OVERVIEW AND PURPOSE: We live in troubled times. Faced with increasingly serious and urgent, wicked sustainability challenges (Lönngren & van Poeck, 2021; United Nations, 2015), such as climate change, pandemics, and violent conflict , more and more people experience anxiety, hopelessness, and worries about the future (Barrineau et al., 2022; Ojala et al., 2021; Pihkala, 2020). The United Nations’ Agenda 2030 with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs; United Nations, 2015) may offer a comforting illusion of a yellow brick road to a known and livable future. Yet, complex systems studies have shown that the future is not only unknown but ultimately unknowable (Dewulf & Biesbroek, 2018; Funtowicz & Ravetz, 1993). In light of such radical uncertainty, Barrineau et al. (2022) argued that environmental and sustainability education (ESE) is not only about “promoting [pre-defined] skills and competencies in sustainability education with which to equip students to tackle sustainability challenges” (p.3) since we do not know yet what competencies they will need. The only thing we know for certain is that future generations will need to develop knowledge, skills, and practices that are different from those we know today, that is, those that have given rise to our current predicaments. In other words, students need to “learn something that is not yet there” (Engeström & Sannino, 2010, p. 2).

In recent years, a range of educational theories and concepts that touch upon this type of learning have increased in popularity. For example, Engeström et al. (Engeström et al., 2022; Engeström & Sannino, 2010) have drawn on cultural historical activity theory to examine expansive learningprocesses that allow learners to develop “expanded pattern[s] of activity, corresponding theoretical concept[s], and new types of agency” (Engeström & Sannino, 2010, p. 7). Similarly, Barrineau et al. (2022) have described emergentist education as a form of teaching and learning that engages with “the possibilities of the not-yet-imagined” (p.2). Others have described related theories, such as transformative and transgressive social learning as crucially important in ESE (Lotz-Sisitka et al., 2015).

These and other traditions of transformative and expansive learning theories have in common that they attend to the role of social interaction for learning, stressing that learning always takes place in social contexts (Lenglet, 2022; Lotz-Sisitka et al., 2015; Van Poeck et al., 2020). Another common thread through many approaches is an attention to spirituality, affect, and/or emotions (Hoggan, 2016; Lenglet, 2022; Lotz-Sisitka et al., 2015). For example, Hoggan (2016) argued that learners must be “emotionally capable of change” (p. 61), pay attention to emotional experiences, and learn to utilize emotional ways of knowing. Similarly, Östman et al. (2019) have used pragmatist theories to argue that strong embodied experiences can trigger transformative learning. This intersection between expansive learning, social interaction, and emotions is the focus of our contribution.

The aim of our study is to explore how expansive learning can manifest in and through emotional interaction when student groups engage with wicked sustainability challenges. To do so, we draw on positioning theory as a theoretical tool that allows us to study emotions as a form of social interaction (Harré & van Langenhove, 1999) rather than something individuals have and experience. More specifically, we explore processes of emotional positioning (Lönngren et al., 2021; Lönngren & Berge, forthcoming), analyzing how students use emotions discursively to position themselves – and each other – in relation to their (expansive) learning and (future) agency to work for sustainable and desired futures.

METHODS: Emotions can be expressed through a wide range of modalities (e.g., speech, gestures, facial expressions, intonation, bodily positions). Therefore, multimodal approaches are particularly suitable for studying how emotions are expressed and used in social interaction (Goodwin et al., 2012; Hufnagel & Kelly, 2018; Lönngren & Berge, forthcoming). For this study, we video-recorded group work conducted by four groups of engineering students. The group work sessions took place during two sustainability courses for engineering students at two Swedish universities and they were part of the students’ regular course work. No researchers were present during the sessions, but teachers entered each room occasionally to check on the groups’ progress. In total, we recorded approximately 70 hours of video data. To analyze the data, we first watched all recordings (~70h) to familiarize ourselves with the data. Thereafter, we formulated sensitizing concepts (consensus/dissensus, convergence/divergence, comfort/vulnerability, intensity, and social positions) to narrow our focus on situations in which we could study emotional positioning and/or expansive learning processes. The sensitizing concepts allowed us to select a smaller number of excerpts for in-depth analysis. For each excerpt, we then developed narrative descriptions of any processes of expansivity and expansive learning we could observe. Finally, we applied the analytic tools of positioning theory to make sense of the ways in which students used emotions discursively while engaging (or not) in expansive learning.

PRELIMINARY FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary findings point to multiple ways in which emotional positioning could facilitate expansive learning during group engagement with wicked challenges. For example, when students suggested norm-breaking methods or solution approaches, other students could validate those ideas by listening attentively and expressing excitement. By validating unconventional ideas, the students also positioned themselves and each other as expansive learners with rights and duties to reach beyond known approaches and solutions. In other excerpts, we observed high levels of emotional congruence between the group members. When one student laughed, others would often join in. In other instances, students would fall silent simultaneously, much like a general pause in an orchestra concert. By enacting these and other forms of emotional congruence, the students could co-construct their group as a team – working together, building on each other’s ideas, and taking collective responsibility for any outcomes they produced. Thus, they also constructed a shared safety-net, reducing perceived risks associated with expansive learning: If the outcomes of their work had turned out to be flawed or ridiculed by others, they could have shared the burden of the perceived (!) failure and helped each other focus on the exceptional learning they had achieved. These findings demonstrate how students could use emotions discursively to position themselves and each other as (a) students who can and should engage in expansive learning, and (b) sustainability agents who can and should contribute to developing innovative solutions to wicked issues. The findings also show how emotions expressed in interaction can have profound impacts on learning, which further stresses the importance of more ESE research on emotions in and as social interaction. A better understanding of emotional interaction in ESE would also support educators in developing teaching and learning environments conducive to expansive learning.

Keywords
emotional positioning, engineering education, expansive learning
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218340 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2023, European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Lodén, A., Lönngren, J. & Ottander, C. (2023). Mastering online searches: how students find science information. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mastering online searches: how students find science information
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218338 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research, Glasgow, UK, August 22-25, 2023
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Lönngren, J. & Tormey, R. (2023). Roundtable discussion: Why should CDIO-programs and educators care about emotions?. In: : . Paper presented at CDIO 2023, 19th International CDIO conference, Trondheim, Norway, June 26-29, 2023. Trondheim
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roundtable discussion: Why should CDIO-programs and educators care about emotions?
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim: , 2023
Keywords
engineering education, emotion
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218341 (URN)
Conference
CDIO 2023, 19th International CDIO conference, Trondheim, Norway, June 26-29, 2023
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Paul, R., Lönngren, J. & Berge, M. (2022). Breaking down dualisms in engineering classrooms: how emotions can support engineering problem solving. In: 2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): . Paper presented at 2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2022, Uppsala, Sweden, 8-11 October, 2022.. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breaking down dualisms in engineering classrooms: how emotions can support engineering problem solving
2022 (English)In: 2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This special session aims to explore, discuss, and deconstruct different dualisms in engineering and engineering education. A broad range of dualisms, such as the rational/emotional, technical/social, and theoretical/practical have strongly influenced engineering education and practice since the 17th century. Engineering education researchers have for a long time raised concerns that these dualisms may deter engineers from taking environmental and social concerns into account when designing new technology, and that they may contribute to excluding certain groups of students from striving to become engineers. Still, the dualisms persist and continue to frustrate engineering educators' efforts to teach subjects such as human-centered design, holistic problem solving, and sustainability thinking. In this session, we will explore how these dualisms manifest in participants' classrooms and how they could be challenged. Specifically, participants will engage in collaborative discussions to explore the impacts of dualisms in engineering classrooms. The session will be of particular interest to engineering educators who wish to create more inclusive learning environments where students engage with holistic approaches to engineering.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022
Series
IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 15394565
Keywords
emotions in engineering, engineering dualisms, hidden curriculum, sociotechnical engineering
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203114 (URN)10.1109/FIE56618.2022.9962596 (DOI)2-s2.0-85143825499 (Scopus ID)9781665462440 (ISBN)
Conference
2022 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2022, Uppsala, Sweden, 8-11 October, 2022.
Available from: 2023-01-17 Created: 2023-01-17 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Lodén, A., Lönngren, J. & Ottander, C. (2022). Digital science competence: secondary school students’ reasoning about filterbubbles and search engines. In: Eridob22: 13th Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus, August 29-September 2, 2022: . Paper presented at Eridob22: 13th Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology University of Cyprus Nicosia, Cyprus, August 29-September 2, 2022 (pp. 67-67). University of Cyprus
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital science competence: secondary school students’ reasoning about filterbubbles and search engines
2022 (English)In: Eridob22: 13th Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus, August 29-September 2, 2022, University of Cyprus , 2022, p. 67-67Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Secondary schools need to develop students’ digital competence. In Sweden this requirement is included in governing documents for school subjects such as civic and history. However, the governing documents for science education in Sweden lack these requirements. This study aims to explore students’ reasoning about digital information retrieval in biology education. The research question is: How do secondary school students’ reason about filter bubbles and their use of search engines when searching for scientific knowledge online? The study employs mixed methods, including (1) a questionnaire with open-ended and multiple-choice questions, (2) written reflections (3) focus group discussions. Altogether 68 students participated in the data collection. The data collection methods were informed by Ribble's framework for digital citizenship  and guided the abductive thematic data analysis. Theme 1: search results and science concepts. Students’ responses indicate a belief that search results are primarily influenced by the keywords used and the search history. Students argued that more serious, credible, and precise search results can be obtained if one uses correctly spelled keywords, appropriate science concepts and synonyms. Theme 2: filter bubbles and information overload. Students demonstrated a low level of awareness about how filter bubbles can influence search results and what consequences this may have for social life; rather than problematizing filter bubbles. These preliminary results indicate that the participating students demonstrate insufficient digital competence and under-developed online search practices when searching for biology-related knowledge online. More research is needed on how science teachers can help students develop the skills and attitudes they need to engage critically and constructively with the ever-increasing amount of science-related information online.       

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Cyprus, 2022
Keywords
digital competence, science education, search engine, selective exposure
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of computer science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-204887 (URN)
Conference
Eridob22: 13th Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology University of Cyprus Nicosia, Cyprus, August 29-September 2, 2022
Available from: 2023-02-15 Created: 2023-02-15 Last updated: 2023-02-17Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9667-2044

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