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Mishra, Laxmi S.
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Huber, C. V., Jakobs, B. D., Mishra, L. S., Niedermaier, S., Stift, M., Winter, G., . . . Funck, D. (2019). DEG10 contributes to mitochondrial proteostasis, root growth, and seed yield in Arabidopsis. Journal of Experimental Botany, 70(19), 5423-5436
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DEG10 contributes to mitochondrial proteostasis, root growth, and seed yield in Arabidopsis
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 70, no 19, p. 5423-5436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maintaining mitochondrial proteome integrity is especially important under stress conditions to ensure a continued ATP supply for protection and adaptation responses in plants. Deg/HtrA proteases are important factors in the cellular protein quality control system, but little is known about their function in mitochondria. Here we analyzed the expression pattern and physiological function of Arabidopsis thaliana DEG10, which has homologs in all photosynthetic eukaryotes. Both expression of DEG10:GFP fusion proteins and immunoblotting after cell fractionation showed an unambiguous subcellular localization exclusively in mitochondria. DEG10 promoter:GUS fusion constructs showed that DEG10 is expressed in trichomes but also in the vascular tissue of roots and aboveground organs. DEG10 loss-of-function mutants were impaired in root elongation, especially at elevated temperature. Quantitative proteome analysis revealed concomitant changes in the abundance of mitochondrial respiratory chain components and assembly factors, which partially appeared to depend on altered mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Under field conditions, lack of DEG10 caused a decrease in seed production. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that DEG10 affects mitochondrial proteostasis, is required for optimal root development and seed set under challenging environmental conditions, and thus contributes to stress tolerance of plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Arabidopsis, Deg proteases, mitochondria, proteome, root, seed yield, temperature stress, G10, which has homologs in all photosynthetic eukaryotes. Both pression of DEG10:GFP fusion proteins and immunoblotting after cell actionation showed an unambiguous subcellular localization exclusively mitochondria. DEG10 promoter:GUS fusion constructs showed that DEG10 expressed in trichomes but also in the vascular tissue of roots and oveground organs. DEG10 loss-of-function mutants were impaired in root ongation, especially at elevated temperature. Quantitative proteome alysis revealed concomitant changes in the abundance of mitochondrial spiratory chain components and assembly factors, which partially peared to depend on altered mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Under eld conditions, lack of DEG10 caused a decrease in seed production. ken together, our findings demonstrate that DEG10 affects tochondrial proteostasis, is required for optimal root development and ed set under challenging environmental conditions, and thus ntributes to stress tolerance of plants.
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164890 (URN)10.1093/jxb/erz294 (DOI)000491240900029 ()31225599 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 2012-005889
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved
Mishra, L. S., Mielke, K., Wagner, R. & Funk, C. (2019). Reduced expression of the proteolytically inactive FtsH members has impacts on the Darwinian fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana. Journal of Experimental Botany, 70(7), 2173-2184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced expression of the proteolytically inactive FtsH members has impacts on the Darwinian fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana
2019 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 2173-2184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

FtsH (filamentation-temperature-sensitive protein H) proteases are a family of membrane-bound enzymes present in eubacteria, animals, and plants. Besides the 12 genes encoding proteolytically active members of the FtsH family in the genome of Arabidopsis, there are five genes coding for members that are assumed to be proteolytically inactive due to mutations in the protease domain; these are termed FtsHi (i for inactive). Despite their lack of proteolytic activity, these FtsHi members seem to be important for chloroplast and plant development as four out of five homozygous knockout-mutants of FtsHis are embryo-lethal. Here, we analysed the Darwinian fitness of weak homozygous (ftshi1,3,4) and heterozygous (ftshi/FTSHi2,4,5) mutants. We compared the growth and development of these mutants to their respective wild-type Arabidopsis plants under controlled laboratory conditions and in the field, and we also evaluated the photosynthetic efficiency by pulse-amplitude modulation fluorescence. Homologous genotypes were subjected to various stress conditions in a greenhouse and gene co-expression as well as phylogenetic analyses were performed. Analysis of the gene-expression network of the five FTSHi genes indicated common clusters with genes encoding FtsH12, OTP51, and methylase. Phylogenetic analyses pointed to a common evolution (and common disappearance in grasses and gymnosperms) of FtsH12 and multiple presumably proteolytically inactive FtsHi enzymes. Our data show that the FtsHi enzymes are highly important during the seedling stage and for Darwinian fitness analyses in semi-natural conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
AAA-type protease, embryo lethal, field trial, FtsH metalloprotease, phenotype, seedling
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159632 (URN)10.1093/jxb/erz004 (DOI)000467901600016 ()30721974 (PubMedID)
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Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
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