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Hellström, Veronica
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
May, A. M., Adema, L. E., Romaguera, D., Vergnaud, A.-C., Agudo, A., Ekelund, U., . . . Peeters, P. H. M. (2012). Determinants of non- response to a second assessment of lifestyle factors and body weight in the EPIC-PANACEA study. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 12, Article ID 148.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determinants of non- response to a second assessment of lifestyle factors and body weight in the EPIC-PANACEA study
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2012 (English)In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, ISSN 1471-2288, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 12, 148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This paper discusses whether baseline demographic, socio-economic, health variables, length of follow-up and method of contacting the participants predict non-response to the invitation for a second assessment of lifestyle factors and body weight in the European multi-center EPIC-PANACEA study. Methods: Over 500.000 participants from several centers in ten European countries recruited between 1992 and 2000 were contacted 2-11 years later to update data on lifestyle and body weight. Length of follow-up as well as the method of approaching differed between the collaborating study centers. Non-responders were compared with responders using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Overall response for the second assessment was high (81.6%). Compared to postal surveys, centers where the participants completed the questionnaire by phone attained a higher response. Response was also high in centers with a short follow-up period. Non-response was higher in participants who were male (odds ratio 1.09 (confidence interval 1.07; 1.11), aged under 40 years (1.96 (1.90; 2.02), living alone (1.40 (1.37; 1.43), less educated (1.35 (1.12; 1.19), of poorer health (1.33 (1.27; 1.39), reporting an unhealthy lifestyle and who had either a low (<18.5 kg/m2, 1.16 (1.09; 1.23)) or a high BMI (>25, 1.08 (1.06; 1.10); especially >= 30 kg/m2, 1.26 (1.23; 1.29)). Conclusions: Cohort studies may enhance cohort maintenance by paying particular attention to the subgroups that are most unlikely to respond and by an active recruitment strategy using telephone interviews.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2012
Keyword
non-response, non-participation, lost-to-follow-up
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104251 (URN)10.1186/1471-2288-12-148 (DOI)000311348200001 ()23006680 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-10 Created: 2015-06-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Naska, A., Orfanos, P., Trichopoulou, A., May, A. M., Overvad, K., Jakobsen, M. U., . . . Peeters, P. H. (2011). Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study.. International Journal of Obesity, 35(3), 416-426.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eating out, weight and weight gain. A cross-sectional and prospective analysis in the context of the EPIC-PANACEA study.
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2011 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 35, no 3, 416-426 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with eating at restaurants and similar establishments or eating at work among 10 European countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

SUBJECTS: This study included a representative sample of 24,310 randomly selected EPIC participants.

METHODS: Single 24-h dietary recalls with information on the place of consumption were collected using standardized procedures between 1995 and 2000. Eating at restaurants was defined to include all eating and drinking occasions at restaurants, cafeterias, bars and fast food outlets. Eating at work included all eating and drinking occasions at the workplace. Associations between eating at restaurants or eating at work and BMI or annual weight changes were assessed using sex-specific linear mixed-effects models, controlling for potential confounders.

RESULTS: In southern Europe energy intake at restaurants was higher than intake at work, whereas in northern Europe eating at work appeared to contribute more to the mean daily intake than eating at restaurants. Cross-sectionally, eating at restaurants was found to be positively associated with BMI only among men (β=+0.24, P=0.003). Essentially no association was found between BMI and eating at work among both genders. In a prospective analysis among men, eating at restaurants was found to be positively, albeit nonsignificantly, associated with weight gain (β=+0.05, P=0.368). No association was detected between energy intake at restaurants and weight changes, controlling for total energy intake.

CONCLUSION: Among men, eating at restaurants and similar establishments was associated with higher BMI and possibly weight gain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2011
Keyword
eating at restaurants, eating at work, body mass index, weight gain, EPIC-PANACEA
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-49659 (URN)10.1038/ijo.2010.142 (DOI)20661252 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-11-14 Created: 2011-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Vergnaud, A.-C., Norat, T., Romaguera, D., Mouw, T., May, A. M., Travier, N., . . . Peeters, P. H. (2010). Meat consumption and prospective weight change in participants of the EPIC-PANACEA study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 92(2), 398-407.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meat consumption and prospective weight change in participants of the EPIC-PANACEA study
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2010 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 92, no 2, 398-407 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Meat intake may be related to weight gain because of its high energy and fat content. Some observational studies have shown that meat consumption is positively associated with weight gain, but intervention studies have shown mixed results.

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess the association between consumption of total meat, red meat, poultry, and processed meat and weight gain after 5 y of follow-up, on average, in the large European population who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project.

DESIGN: A total of 103,455 men and 270,348 women aged 25-70 y were recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Diet was assessed at baseline with the use of country-specific validated questionnaires. A dietary calibration study was conducted in a representative subsample of the cohort. Weight and height were measured at baseline and self-reported at follow-up in most centers. Associations between energy from meat (kcal/d) and annual weight change (g/y) were assessed with the use of linear mixed models, controlled for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, dietary patterns, and other potential confounders.

RESULTS: Total meat consumption was positively associated with weight gain in men and women, in normal-weight and overweight subjects, and in smokers and nonsmokers. With adjustment for estimated energy intake, an increase in meat intake of 250 g/d (eg, one steak at approximately 450 kcal) would lead to a 2-kg higher weight gain after 5 y (95% CI: 1.5, 2.7 kg). Positive associations were observed for red meat, poultry, and processed meat.

CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a decrease in meat consumption may improve weight management.

National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36117 (URN)10.3945/ajcn.2009.28713 (DOI)000280149700019 ()20592131 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Romaguera, D., Norat, T., Vergnaud, A.-C., Mouw, T., May, A. M., Agudo, A., . . . Peeters, P. H. (2010). Mediterranean dietary patterns and prospective weight change in participants of the EPIC-PANACEA project. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 92(4), 912-921.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediterranean dietary patterns and prospective weight change in participants of the EPIC-PANACEA project
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2010 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 92, no 4, 912-921 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is an association between a greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet and a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases. However, it is not clear whether this dietary pattern may be also protective against the development of obesity.

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the association between the adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MDP), prospective weight change, and the incidence of overweight or obesity.

DESIGN: We conducted a prospective cohort study [the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol Consumption, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home, and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project] in 373,803 individuals (103,455 men and 270,348 women; age range: 25-70 y) from 10 European countries. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at recruitment and after a median follow-up time of 5 y. The relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED; score range: 0-18) was used to assess adherence to the MDP according to the consumption of 9 dietary components that are characteristic of the Mediterranean diet. The association between the rMED and 5-y weight change was modeled through multiadjusted mixed-effects linear regression. RESULTS: Individuals with a high adherence to the MDP according to the rMED (11-18 points) showed a 5-y weight change of -0.16 kg (95% CI: -0.24, -0.07 kg) and were 10% (95% CI: 4%, 18%) less likely to develop overweight or obesity than were individuals with a low adherence to the MDP (0-6 points). The low meat content of the Mediterranean diet seemed to account for most of its positive effect against weight gain.

CONCLUSION: This study shows that promoting the MDP as a model of healthy eating may help to prevent weight gain and the development of obesity.

National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36116 (URN)10.3945/ajcn.2010.29482 (DOI)000282234100031 ()20810975 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Romaguera, D., Norat, T., Mouw, T., May, A. M., Bamia, C., Slimani, N., . . . Peeters, P. H. (2009). Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with lower abdominal adiposity in European men and women.. Journal of Nutrition, 139(9), 1728-1737.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with lower abdominal adiposity in European men and women.
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2009 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 139, no 9, 1728-1737 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Given the lack of consistent evidence of the relationship between Mediterranean dietary patterns and body fat, we assessed the cross-sectional association between adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, BMI, and waist circumference (WC). A total of 497,308 individuals (70.7% women) aged 25-70 y from 10 European countries participated in this study. Diet was assessed at baseline using detailed validated country-specific questionnaires, and anthropometrical measurements were collected using standardized procedures. The association between the degree of adherence to the modified-Mediterranean Diet Score (mMDS) (including high consumption of vegetables, legumes, fruits and nuts, cereals, fish and seafood, and unsaturated:saturated fatty acids ratio; moderate alcohol intake; and low consumption of meat and meat products and dairy products) and BMI (kg.m(-2)) or WC (cm) was modeled through mixed-effects linear regression, controlling for potential confounders. Overall, the mMDS was not significantly associated with BMI. Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was significantly associated with lower WC, for a given BMI, in both men (-0.09; 95% CI -0.14 to -0.04) and women (-0.06; 95% CI -0.10 to -0.01). The association was stronger in men (-0.20; 95% CI -0.23 to -0.17) and women (-0.17; 95% CI -0.21 to -0.13) from Northern European countries. Despite the observed heterogeneity among regions, results of this study suggest that adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, high in foods of vegetable origin and unsaturated fatty acids, is associated with lower abdominal adiposity measured by WC in European men and women.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-40952 (URN)10.3945/jn.109.108902 (DOI)19571036 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-15 Created: 2011-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Ocké, M. C., Larrañaga, N., Grioni, S., van den Berg, S. W., Ferrari, P., Salvini, S., . . . Slimani, N. (2009). Energy intake and sources of energy intake in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63 Suppl 4, S3-15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy intake and sources of energy intake in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
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2009 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 63 Suppl 4, S3-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

These data highlight and quantify the variations and similarities in energy intake and sources of energy intake among 10 European countries. The prevalence of low-energy reporting indicates that the study of energy intake is hampered by the problem of underreporting.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-40950 (URN)10.1038/ejcn.2009.72 (DOI)19888279 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-15 Created: 2011-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Halkjaer, J., Olsen, A., Bjerregaard, L. J., Deharveng, G., Tjønneland, A., Welch, A. A., . . . Bingham, S. (2009). Intake of total, animal and plant proteins, and their food sources in 10 countries in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63 Suppl 4, S16-36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intake of total, animal and plant proteins, and their food sources in 10 countries in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
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2009 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 63 Suppl 4, S16-36 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study shows that intake of protein, especially of animal origin, differs across the 10 European countries, and also shows some differences in food sources of protein across Europe.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-40945 (URN)10.1038/ejcn.2009.73 (DOI)19888272 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-15 Created: 2011-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Skeie, G., Braaten, T., Hjartåker, A., Lentjes, M., Amiano, P., Jakszyn, P., . . . Slimani, N. (2009). Use of dietary supplements in the European prospective investigation into Cancer and nutrition calibration study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63 Suppl 4, S226-238.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of dietary supplements in the European prospective investigation into Cancer and nutrition calibration study
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2009 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 63 Suppl 4, S226-238 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study indicates that there are wide variations in supplement use in Europe, which may affect individual and population nutrient intakes. The results underline the need to monitor consumption of dietary supplements in Europe, as well as to evaluate the risks and benefits.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-40954 (URN)10.1038/ejcn.2009.83 (DOI)19888276 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-15 Created: 2011-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
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