Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Rönngren, Y., Björk, A., Haage, D. & Audulv, Å. (2024). Initiating and maintaining a lifestyle program directed at persons living with severe mental illness in a municipality care setting. Issues in Mental Health Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Initiating and maintaining a lifestyle program directed at persons living with severe mental illness in a municipality care setting
2024 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Lifestyle programs are effective in improving the health of persons living with severe mental illness. However, the implementation of these programs and making them a sustainable part of daily care remain challenging. This qualitative descriptive study aimed to describe how staff worked with and experienced a lifestyle program in a municipality mental health care setting over time. The program intended to support persons living with severe mental illness to overcome health challenges. Data was collected at three time points spanning 7 years. The staff motivated the participants with SMI with severe mental illness to take part in the program, prepared them, and gave them individualized lifestyle support. A key factor of the program’s implementation was the staff’s interest and engagement in lifestyle questions. According to the staff it was apparent that small efforts such as running the present program could give synergic health effects such as improved mental- and social health. This study shows that it is feasible to conduct this lifestyle program in ordinary care without considerable resources. However, support from management is crucial, as well as the development of guidelines and routines of the work with lifestyle questions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-225266 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2024.2344805 (DOI)001216417000001 ()38717866 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85192541024 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-30 Created: 2024-05-30 Last updated: 2024-05-30
Glans, A., Wilén, J., Hansson, B., Audulv, Å. & Lindgren, L. (2024). Managing acoustic noise within MRI: a qualitative interview study among Swedish radiographers. Radiography, 30(3), 889-895
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing acoustic noise within MRI: a qualitative interview study among Swedish radiographers
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Radiography, ISSN 1078-8174, E-ISSN 1532-2831, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 889-895Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Acoustic noise from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can cause hearing loss and needs to be mitigated to ensure the safety of patients and personnel. Capturing MR personnel's insights is crucial for guiding the development and future applications of noise-reduction technology. This study aimed to explore how MR radiographers manage acoustic noise in clinical MR settings.

Methods: Using a qualitative design, we conducted semi-structured individual interviews with fifteen MR radiographers from fifteen hospitals around Sweden. We focused on the clinical implications of participants’ noise management, using an interpretive description approach. We also identified sociotechnical interactions between People, Environment, Tools, and Tasks (PETT) by adopting a Human Factors/Ergonomics framework. Interview data were analyzed inductively with thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke).

Results: The analysis generated three main themes regarding MR radiographers’ noise management: (I) Navigating Occupational Noise: Risk Management and Adaptation; (II) Protecting the Patient and Serving the Exam, and (III) Establishing a Safe Healthcare Environment with Organizational Support.

Conclusion: This study offers insights into radiographers’ experiences of managing acoustic noise within MRI, and the associated challenges. Radiographers have adopted multiple strategies to protect patients and themselves from adverse noise-related effects. However, they require tools and support to manage this effectively, suggesting a need for organizations to adopt more proactive, holistic approaches to safety initiatives.

Implications for practice: The radiographers stressed the importance of a soundproofed work environment to minimize occupational adverse health effects and preserve work performance. They acknowledge noise as a common contributor to patient distress and discomfort. Providing options like earplugs, headphones, mold putty, software-optimized “quiet” sequences, and patient information were important tools. Fostering a safety culture requires proactive safety efforts and support from colleagues and management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Acoustic noise, Human factors, MRI safety, Occupational health, Patient safety, Thematic analysis
National Category
Nursing Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-223498 (URN)10.1016/j.radi.2024.04.002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85189915794 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-25 Created: 2024-04-25 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Aagaard, H., Hall, E. .., Audulv, Å., Ludvigsen, M. S., Westergren, T. & Fegran, L. (2023). Parents’ experiences of transitioning to home with a very-low-birthweight infant: a meta-ethnography. Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 29(3), 444-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents’ experiences of transitioning to home with a very-low-birthweight infant: a meta-ethnography
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 1355-1841, E-ISSN 1878-089X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 444-452Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Medical-technological advances and neurodevelopmental care have improved the survival of extremely- and very-low-birthweight infants born before 32 weeks' gestation. After months in neonatal care, the infants are discharged, and parents exited but full of anxiety. This review is designed as a meta-ethnography, addressing parents' discharge experiences to comprehend the synthesised research, which includes 12 eligible studies. From the analysis, we constructed three themes: ‘approaching discharge with both uncertainty and confidence’; ‘discharge as a longed-for though disordering turning point’; and ‘facing joys, worries and multiple challenges when at home’. The overarching interpretation was ‘discharge as double-edged sword’. We conclude that bringing home very-low-birthweight infants is a joyful event, yet parents also experience discharge as never-endingly worrying, as a time filled with challenges to which parents must adapt and as necessitating continuous support from knowledgeable providers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Discharge-to-home, Extremely-low-birthweight, Meta-ethnography, Neonatal care, parents, Transition, Very-low-birthweight
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203115 (URN)10.1016/j.jnn.2022.11.012 (DOI)2-s2.0-85145226805 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-16 Created: 2023-01-16 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Audulv, Å., Westergren, T., Ludvigsen, M. S., Pedersen, M. K., Fegran, L., Hall, E. O. C., . . . Kneck, Å. (2023). Time and change: a typology for presenting research findings in qualitative longitudinal research. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 23(1), Article ID 284.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time and change: a typology for presenting research findings in qualitative longitudinal research
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Qualitative longitudinal research (QLR) is an emerging methodology used in health research. The method literature states that the change in a phenomenon through time should be the focus of any QLR study, but in empirical studies, the analysis of changes through time is often poorly described, and the emphasis on time/change in the findings varies greatly. This inconsistency might depend on limitations in the existing method literature in terms of describing how QLR studies can present findings. The aim of this study was to develop and describe a typology of alternative approaches for integrating time and/or change in QLR findings.

Methods: In this method study, we used an adapted scoping review design. Articles were identified using EBSCOhost. In total, methods and results sections from 299 QLR articles in the field of health research were analyzed with inspiration from content analysis.

Results: We constructed a typology of three types and seven subtypes. The types were based on the underlying structural principles of how time/change was presented: Type A) Findings have a low utilization of longitudinal data, Type B) Findings are structured according to chronological time, and Type C) Findings focus on changes through time. These types differed in 1) the way the main focus was on time, change or neither; 2) the level of interpretation in the findings; and 3) how theoretical understandings of time/change were articulated in the articles. Each type encompassed two or three subtypes that represented distinct approaches to the aim and results presentation of QLR findings.

Conclusions: This method study is the first to describe a coherent and comprehensive typology of alternative approaches for integrating time/change into QLR findings in health research. By providing examples of various subtypes that can be used for results presentations, it can help researchers make informed decisions suitable to their research intent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Longitudinal studies, Method study, Qualitative research, Repeated data collection, Research design, Typology
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218140 (URN)10.1186/s12874-023-02105-1 (DOI)38057741 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178960247 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-15 Created: 2023-12-15 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Lundell, S., Pesola, U.-M., Audulv, Å. & Wadell, K. (2022). Evaluation of a Digital COPD Education Program for Healthcare Professionals in Long-Term Care: A Mixed Methods Study. The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 17, 905-918
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a Digital COPD Education Program for Healthcare Professionals in Long-Term Care: A Mixed Methods Study
Show others...
2022 (English)In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 17, p. 905-918Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lack of routines and competence among healthcare professionals have been reported as barriers to COPD management in long-term care. Online education could be used as a strategy to make COPD education more accessible.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate a digital COPD education program for healthcare professionals in long-term care regarding feasibility, knowledge and working procedures.

Methods: A randomized controlled feasibility trial with a convergent mixed methods design was conducted. Two municipalities in Sweden were randomized to intervention (n=20) or control (n=17). The intervention was a digital COPD education program accessible for three months. Data was collected through questionnaires on COPD-specific knowledge, conceptual knowledge, feasibility and usage of the COPD Web platform. Repeated individual interviews using a semi-structured interview guide was also performed. Quantitative and qualitative findings were merged using a mixed methods design.

Results: The digital COPD education program appears feasible based on the expressed satisfaction of the healthcare workers and their reports that it supported them in their work. Across questionnaires, objective COPD-specific knowledge increased by 14 to 16 percentage points in the intervention group compared to 0 to 6 percentage points in the control group (p=0.001). The objective increase in COPD-specific knowledge was also captured in the interviews, where a perceived increase in knowledge led to increased security and focus on COPD management. Few changes in working procedures were expressed, but participants felt that attention was raised regarding COPD and the importance of preventive healthcare services. In addition, increased knowledge of healthcare services provided by other involved professions was emphasized, leading to discussions with other professions in relation to COPD management. 

Conclusion: A digital COPD education program is feasible and can increase the COPD-specific knowledge of healthcare professionals in long-term care, leading to increased focus on COPD-related issues. More comprehensive measures, including organizational changes, might be needed to change working procedures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove press, 2022
Keywords
e-health, feasibility, work task, qualitative longitudinal research, questionnaire
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-194111 (URN)10.2147/copd.s353187 (DOI)000791768200005 ()35497374 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129780793 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20160505Konung Gustaf V:s och Drottning Victorias Frimurarestiftelse
Note

The abstract of this paper was presented at the European Respiratory Society Annual Conference 2021 as a poster presentation with interim findings. The poster’s abstract was published in “Poster Abstracts” in European Respiratory Journal 2021 58: PA758; DOI: 10.1183/13993003.congress-2021.PA758.

Available from: 2022-04-25 Created: 2022-04-25 Last updated: 2024-03-22Bibliographically approved
Kephart, G., Packer, T., Audulv, Å., Chen, Y.-T., Robinson, A., Olsson, I. & Warner, G. (2022). Item selection, scaling and construct validation of the Patient-Reported Inventory of Self-Management of Chronic Conditions (PRISM-CC) measurement tool in adults. Quality of Life Research, 31(9), 2867-2880
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Item selection, scaling and construct validation of the Patient-Reported Inventory of Self-Management of Chronic Conditions (PRISM-CC) measurement tool in adults
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 2867-2880Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To select and scale items for the seven domains of the Patient-Reported Inventory of Self-Management of Chronic Conditions (PRISM-CC) and assess its construct validity.

Methods: Using an online survey, data on 100 potential items, and other variables for assessing construct validity, were collected from 1055 adults with one or more chronic health conditions. Based on a validated conceptual model, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and item response models (IRT) were used to select and scale potential items and assess the internal consistency and structural validity of the PRISM-CC. To further assess construct validity, hypothesis testing of known relationships was conducted using structural equation models.

Results: Of 100 potential items, 36 (4–8 per domain) were selected, providing excellent fit to our hypothesized correlated factors model and demonstrating internal consistency and structural validity of the PRISM-CC. Hypothesized associations between PRISM-CC domains and other measures and variables were confirmed, providing further evidence of construct validity.

Conclusion: The PRISM-CC overcomes limitations of assessment tools currently available to measure patient self-management of chronic health conditions. This study provides strong evidence for the internal consistency and construct validity of the PRISM-CC as an instrument to assess patient-reported difficulty in self-managing different aspects of daily life with one or more chronic conditions. Further research is needed to assess its measurement equivalence across patient attributes, ability to measure clinically important change, and utility to inform self-management support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
Keywords
Chronic disease, Multimorbidity, Patient outcome assessment, Patient-centered care, Psychometrics, Self-management
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203238 (URN)10.1007/s11136-022-03165-4 (DOI)000817030100001 ()35759127 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85132900748 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-17 Created: 2023-01-17 Last updated: 2023-01-17Bibliographically approved
Audulv, Å., Hall, E. O. C., Kneck, Å., Westergren, T., Fegran, L., Pedersen, M. K., . . . Ludvigsen, M. S. (2022). Qualitative longitudinal research in health research: a method study. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 22(1), Article ID 255.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qualitative longitudinal research in health research: a method study
Show others...
2022 (English)In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 255Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Qualitative longitudinal research (QLR) comprises qualitative studies, with repeated data collection, that focus on the temporality (e.g., time and change) of a phenomenon. The use of QLR is increasing in health research since many topics within health involve change (e.g., progressive illness, rehabilitation). A method study can provide an insightful understanding of the use, trends and variations within this approach. The aim of this study was to map how QLR articles within the existing health research literature are designed to capture aspects of time and/or change.

Methods: This method study used an adapted scoping review design. Articles were eligible if they were written in English, published between 2017 and 2019, and reported results from qualitative data collected at different time points/time waves with the same sample or in the same setting. Articles were identified using EBSCOhost. Two independent reviewers performed the screening, selection and charting.

Results: A total of 299 articles were included. There was great variation among the articles in the use of methodological traditions, type of data, length of data collection, and components of longitudinal data collection. However, the majority of articles represented large studies and were based on individual interview data. Approximately half of the articles self-identified as QLR studies or as following a QLR design, although slightly less than 20% of them included QLR method literature in their method sections.

Conclusions: QLR is often used in large complex studies. Some articles were thoroughly designed to capture time/change throughout the methodology, aim and data collection, while other articles included few elements of QLR. Longitudinal data collection includes several components, such as what entities are followed across time, the tempo of data collection, and to what extent the data collection is preplanned or adapted across time. Therefore, there are several practices and possibilities researchers should consider before starting a QLR project.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Method development, Qualitative longitudinal research, Repeated data collection
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200408 (URN)10.1186/s12874-022-01732-4 (DOI)000862565000004 ()36182899 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139116135 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-20 Created: 2022-10-20 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Audulv, Å., Hutchinson, S., Warner, G., Kephart, G., Versnel, J. & Packeref, T. L. (2021). Managing everyday life: Self-management strategies people use to live well with neurological conditions. Patient Education and Counseling, 104(2), 413-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing everyday life: Self-management strategies people use to live well with neurological conditions
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 413-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This paper uses the Taxonomy of Everyday Self-management Strategies (TEDSS) to provideinsight and understanding into the complex and interdependent self-management strategies peoplewith neurological conditions use to manage everyday life.

Methods: As part of a national Canadian study, structured telephone interviews were conducted monthlyfor eleven months, with 117 people living with one or more neurological conditions. Answers to fiveopen-ended questions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. A total of 7236 statements wereanalyzed.

Results: Findings are presented in two overarching patterns: 1) self-management pervades all aspects oflife, and 2) self-management is a chain of decisions and behaviours. Participants emphasizedmanagement of daily activities and social relationships as important to maintaining meaning in theirlives.

Conclusion: Managing everyday life with a neurological condition includes a wide range of diversestrategies that often interact and complement each other. Some people need to intentionally manageevery aspect of everyday life.

Practice implications: For people living with neurological conditions, there is a need for health providersand systems to go beyond standard advice for self-management. Self-management support is besttailored to each individual, their life context and the realities of their illness trajectory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Neurological conditions, Patient experience, Qualitative research, Self-management, Self-care, TEDSS, Chronic conditions
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174378 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2020.07.025 (DOI)000614149200028 ()32819756 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85089520856 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-21 Created: 2020-08-21 Last updated: 2021-07-06Bibliographically approved
Keddy, A. C., Packer, T. L., Audulv, Å., Sutherland, L., Sampalli, T., Edwards, L. & Kephart, G. (2021). The Team Assessment of Self-Management Support (TASMS): A new approach to uncovering how teams support people with chronic conditions. Healthcare Management Forum. Healthcare Management Forum, 34(1), 43-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Team Assessment of Self-Management Support (TASMS): A new approach to uncovering how teams support people with chronic conditions. Healthcare Management Forum
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Healthcare Management Forum, ISSN 0840-4704, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Canadian and other healthcare systems are adopting primary care models founded on multidisciplinary, team-based care. This paper describes the development and use of a new tool, the Team Assessment of Self-Management Support (TASMS), designed to understand and improve the self-management support teams provide to patients with chronic conditions. Team Assessment of Self-Management Support captures the time providers spend supporting seven different types of self-management support (process strategies, resources strategies, disease controlling strategies, activities strategies, internal strategies, social interactions strategies, and healthy behaviours strategies), their referral patterns and perceived gaps in care. Four unique features make TASMS user-friendly: it is patient-centred, it uses provider-level data to create a team profile, it has the ability to be tailored to needs (diagnosis and visit type), and visual presentation of results are quickly and intuitively understood by both providers and planners. Currently being used by providers and planners in Nova Scotia, scaling up will allow more widespread use

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174377 (URN)10.1177/0840470420942262 (DOI)2-s2.0-85088839494 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-21 Created: 2020-08-21 Last updated: 2021-01-13Bibliographically approved
Westergren, T., Ludvigsen, M. S., Audulv, Å., Aagaard, H., Hall, E. O. C., Pedersen, M. K. & Fegran, L. (2020). Physical activity experiences of children and adolescents with asthma: a qualitative systematic review protocol. JBI Evidence Synthesis, 18(11), 2390-2395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity experiences of children and adolescents with asthma: a qualitative systematic review protocol
Show others...
2020 (English)In: JBI Evidence Synthesis, E-ISSN 2689-8381, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 2390-2395Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The objective of the review is to synthesize existing knowledge about experiences of children and adolescents with asthma related to participation in, or limitation of, physical activity.

Introduction: Limitations of physical activity, expressed as a barrier of bodily movement, may relate to physiological restraints, as well as emotional and social delimitation, in children and adolescents with asthma. Participation in physical activity is related to management of asthma and is also important for social inclusion. Through childhood and adolescence, physical activity enhances physical, cognitive, and social development, and a dose-response relationship between physical activity and several indicators of improved health is established. Knowledge is needed about experiences of physical activity in children and adolescents with asthma to inform tailored care and implementation of exercise and physical activity supporting interventions into clinical practice.

Inclusion criteria: This review will consider qualitative studies that include subjective experiences related to participation in, or limitation of, physical activity in children and adolescents with asthma through childhood and adolescence (six to 18 years), in English-language studies from all countries.

Methods: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, SocINDEX, and Social Science Citation Index List will be searched for relevant studies. Study selection, assessment of methodological quality, data extraction, synthesis, and assessment of certainty of findings will be conducted using the JBI meta-aggregation approach.

Systematic review registration number: The systematic review is registered in PROSPERO (CRD42020164797).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2020
Keywords
asthma, developmental transition, exercise limitation, participation in physical activity, qualitative research synthesis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-175625 (URN)10.11124/JBIES-20-00004 (DOI)000684231800012 ()32868707 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85096152624 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-06 Created: 2020-10-06 Last updated: 2024-01-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4456-7853

Search in DiVA

Show all publications