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Hofverberg, A. & Winberg, M. T. (2020). Challenging the Universality of Achievement Goal Models: a Comparison of Two Culturally Distinct Countries. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 64(3), 333-354
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenging the Universality of Achievement Goal Models: a Comparison of Two Culturally Distinct Countries
2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 333-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Achievement goal theory is one of the most widespread motivation models within education research. Strong empirical support exists for the trichotomous model, comprising mastery-approach, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. However, research also indicate problems with model transferability between contexts. In this study, based on questionnaire data from 4201 students, we use confirmatory factor analysis to compare the factor structures of students’ achievement goals in two culturally distinct countries. Factor structures for Grades 5–11 within the two countries were also compared. Results show that the separation between performance-approach and performance-avoidance goals differs between the two countries, and that this difference is consistent over the grades. Hence, results indicate that the model is not freely transferable between countries. The results are discussed in relation to differences in national culture and other proposed explanations such as age, perceived competence, and questionnaire characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2020
Keywords
achievement goals, factor structure, transferability, culture. Sweden, Germany, measurement invariance, confirmatory factor analysis
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153766 (URN)10.1080/00313831.2018.1544170 (DOI)000513310200002 ()
Projects
DOLIS
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013-2180
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2020-04-14Bibliographically approved
Hofverberg, A. & Winberg, M. (2019). Interplay between achievement goals and goal structures: Effects on achievement and motivation. In: Book of Abstracts EARLI 2019: . Paper presented at The 18th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI2019), 12–16 August, 2019, Aachen, Germany.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interplay between achievement goals and goal structures: Effects on achievement and motivation
2019 (English)In: Book of Abstracts EARLI 2019, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research has shown direct and indirect effects of students’ achievement goals and classroom goal structures on school performance and motivation. However, whether, and how, the effects of students’ achievement goals depend on classroom goal structures has not received much attention. Moreover, extant studies have not accounted for nonlinear effects, which may mask matching effects between goals and structures. Our study aims at providing a nuanced picture of the direct, interaction, and nonlinear effects of achievement goals and goal structures on student’s test performance and motivation in chemistry. Multiple linear regression in combination with response surface plots were used in the analysis of questionnaire data from 909 students involved in a cross-sectional survey in Grades 6-10. Results indicate that interactions between goals are more influential on student achievement and motivation than interactions between goals and structures. No evidence for a general matching effect between goals and goal structures was found. Mastery goals were universally beneficial, but in particular when students were low in performance goals and the perceived performance structure was weak. Overall, it seems that the influence of classroom goal structures on the effect of achievement goals may be smaller than previously assumed.

Keywords
Educational Psychology, Goal orientation, Motivation, Science education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165551 (URN)
Conference
The 18th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI2019), 12–16 August, 2019, Aachen, Germany
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013- 2180
Available from: 2019-11-26 Created: 2019-11-26 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Winberg, M. T., Hofverberg, A., Lindfors, M., Parchmann, I., Bernholt, A., Bernholt, S., . . . Kampa, N. (2019). Kognition, kunskapssyn, intresse och motivation i kemi: en jämförelse av elevers utveckling över skolåren 5–10 i Sverige och Tyskland. In: Resultatdialog 2019: (pp. 112-116). Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kognition, kunskapssyn, intresse och motivation i kemi: en jämförelse av elevers utveckling över skolåren 5–10 i Sverige och Tyskland
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2019 (Swedish)In: Resultatdialog 2019, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2019, p. 112-116Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
didactics of chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167928 (URN)9789188943224 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-02180
Available from: 2020-02-06 Created: 2020-02-06 Last updated: 2020-02-25Bibliographically approved
Borg, F., Winberg, M. & Vinterek, M. (2019). Preschool children's knowledge about the environmental impact of various modes of transport. Early Child Development and Care, 189(3), 376-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preschool children's knowledge about the environmental impact of various modes of transport
2019 (English)In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 189, no 3, p. 376-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explored Swedish preschool children’s knowledge about theenvironmental impact of various transport modes, and investigatedwhether or not eco-certification has any role to play in relation to thisknowledge. Additionally, this study examined children’s perceivedsources of knowledge. Using illustrations and semi-structured questions,53 children, aged five to six years, from six eco-certified and six non-eco-certified preschools were interviewed. Qualitative and quantitative datawere analysed using content analysis and Orthogonal Partial LeastSquares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA), respectively. Findings revealedthat most of the children had acquired some knowledge about theenvironmental impact of various transport modes, although somechildren were not familiar with the word‘environment’. Although thecomplexity of children’s justifications for the environmental impact ofdifferent modes of transport tended to be higher at eco-certifiedpreschools compared to non-eco-certified preschools, no statisticallysignificant differences were found. Parents were reported to be a majorsource of knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
climate change, early childhood education, environmental sustainability, SOLO Taxonomy, sustainable development, transport modes
National Category
Pedagogical Work Psychology
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134127 (URN)10.1080/03004430.2017.1324433 (DOI)000456811200002 ()
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Winberg, M. T., Hofverberg, A. & Lindfors, M. (2019). Relationships between epistemic beliefs and achievement goals: developmental trends over grades 5–11. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 34(2), 295-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between epistemic beliefs and achievement goals: developmental trends over grades 5–11
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, ISSN 0256-2928, E-ISSN 1878-5174, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 295-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Examining how students' epistemic beliefs (EB) influence their cognition is central to EB research. Recently, the relation between students' EB and their motivation has gained attention. In the present study, we investigate the development of the relationship between students' EB and their achievement goals (AG) over grades 5–11. Previous studies on this topic are limited, in both number and range, and have produced inconsistent results. We performed a cross-sectional study, ranging over grades 5–11, and a 3-year longitudinal study (n = 1230 and 323, respectively). Data on students' EB and AG were collected via questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported a two-factor goal model (Mastery and Performance goals) and a structure of students' EB comprising Certainty, Source, Development, and Justification. For each grade, students' CFA scores on the respective goals were regressed on their scores on the EB dimensions by orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis. Although results indicated a weak relation between students' EB and AG, trends in the cross-sectional data were largely replicated in the longitudinal study. Though naïve EB were in general associated with performance goals and sophisticated EB with mastery goals, the transition to upper secondary school was associated with changes in the relationship between students' EB and AG. We discuss how the commonly used formulations of EB items may affect their ability to measure the naïve-sophisticated continuum, in turn affecting the predictive roles of EB dimensions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Epistemic beliefs, Achievement goals, Relationship, Development, Grade 5 11, Science
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147665 (URN)10.1007/s10212-018-0391-z (DOI)000461328900002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013-2180
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2020-04-14Bibliographically approved
Bernholt, A., Lindfors, M. & Winberg, M. (2019). Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany and their interrelations with classroom characteristics. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany and their interrelations with classroom characteristics
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In the field of epistemic belief research, more studies on how these beliefs are formed in different cultural contexts are called for. Moreover, there are strong assumptions that teachers’ instructional practices are paramount to the development of students’ epistemic beliefs. The current study aims at investigating differences between Sweden and Germany in both, and in their relationships. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 4,731 students in Grades 5 through 11. To sum up, latent multi group comparison revealed several differences in the level of students’ beliefs and classroom characteristics. Moreover, latent regression analyses showed that the observed classroom characteristics were significant predictors of students’ beliefs concerning the justification and development of knowledge, and that the prediction pattern differ between countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Students’ epistemic beliefs, classroom context, cross-country comparison, national cultural differences
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147664 (URN)10.1080/00313831.2019.1651763 (DOI)000483934000001 ()2-s2.0-85071316130 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013-2180
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2020-01-09
Lindfors, M., Winberg, M. & Bodin, M. (2019). The role of students' scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 63(1), 124-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of students' scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 124-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on how epistemic beliefs influence students' learning in different contexts is ambiguous. Given this, we have examined the relationships between students' scientific epistemic beliefs, their problem solving, and solutions in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. The problem solving process and performance of 19 tenth grade students, with different scientific epistemic beliefs, was video recorded and inductively coded. Quantitative analysis revealed that different sets of epistemic beliefs were conducive to different aspects of students' problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, authority dependence was associated with high degree of adherence to instructions. Hence, there might not be a universal relationship between theoretical sophistication of students' epistemic beliefs and quality of learning outcomes. We suggest that the conduciveness to desired outcomes is a better measure of sophistication than theoretical non-contextualized a priori assumptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Epistemic beliefs, problem solving, computer simulation, sophistication
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134192 (URN)10.1080/00313831.2017.1324907 (DOI)000451601200008 ()2-s2.0-85020209220 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DOLIS
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013-2180
Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Vinterek, M., Winberg, M. T., Tegmark, M., Alatalo, T. & Liberg, C. (2018). Amount of Text Read at School and the Motivation for Reading: A Large Scale Study in Grade 6 and 9. In: European Conference on Educational Research, Bolzano, Italy, September 4-7, 2018: Abstracts. Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research, Bolzano, Italy, September 4-7, 2018. Berlin
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amount of Text Read at School and the Motivation for Reading: A Large Scale Study in Grade 6 and 9
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2018 (English)In: European Conference on Educational Research, Bolzano, Italy, September 4-7, 2018: Abstracts, Berlin, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on some preliminary results from the project “To read or not to read: A study of reading practices in compulsory school” funded by the Swedish Research Council. The aim of the project is to develop knowledge of existing reading practices and to find out what kind of teaching that promotes such practices in a way that enables students to learn from reading. The decline in students’ reading literacy is something that concerns and worries many European and other Western countries. But surprisingly it is difficult to find large scale studies focusing on how much students read at school. To be a good reader one needs to practice (Kuhn & Stahl, 2003; Campell et al., 2001); it takes more than 5000 hours of reading to achieve a well-functioning reading capacity (Lundberg & Herrlin, 2005). To learn from text one needs to be able to read a longer text (Topping et al., 2007; Merisuo-Storm & Soininen, 2014). Prior research in the field further shows that it is important for students to read different types of texts (Kuhn & Stahl, 2003) and thus develop vocabulary and reading skills in many subjects (see, for example, Biemiller, 2001).The amount of reading, at school or at leisure, correlates positively with reading ability (Anderson et al., 1988; Cunningham & Stanovich, 1997; Taylor et al., 990). In our study we therefore are interested in the total amount of coherent and continuous text students read during an average school day in all their subjects, with a particular focus on reading habits in Swedish (L1), English (L2), Chemistry, and History. We also want to find out how the amount of reading correlates with the students’ self-assessed motivation for their school-initiated reading activities. In the first part of the project there is a predominantly quantitative focus in which we seek to find out the extent to which students read continuous prose texts – fictional as well as non-fictional – as part of their everyday school work, and how their reading is related to different types of motivation. The second part of the project has a predominantly qualitative focus where a limited number of groups will be selected for a series of closer classroom studies of teachers as well as students through observations, interviews and questionnaires in order to find out what characterizes the reading practices of these schools and classes. This paper will report on some preliminary results from the first part of the project where the following research questions are to be answered:

  • To what extent do students in years 6 and 9 read continuous prose text—fiction as well as nonfiction— as part of their school work?
  • What kind of motivation do students express for reading nonfiction and fiction texts in different school subjects?
  • What is the nature of the relationship between students’ reading motivation and the extent of their reading in school?
  • What differences in the interest of reading and in the reading habits among females and males, between school years 6 and 9, and between schools can be detected?
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: , 2018
Keywords
reading, nonfiction, fiction, school subjects, motivation
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of chemistry; didactics of history; language teaching and learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152501 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research, Bolzano, Italy, September 4-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Hofverberg, A. & Winberg, M. T. (2018). Challenging the Universality of Achievement Goals: A Comparison of Two Culturally Distinct Countries. In: : . Paper presented at International Conference on Motivation (ICM) 2018, Aarhus, Denmark, August 15-17, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenging the Universality of Achievement Goals: A Comparison of Two Culturally Distinct Countries
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure of achievement goals among students in Sweden and Germany, two countries differing substantially in competitiveness according to Hofstede’s dimensions of national culture. As the competitiveness dimension resembles performance goal classroom structures, shown to affect students’ achievement goals, we propose that the structure of students’ achievement goals may differ between the countries. Through confirmatory factor analyses, we found that a three-factor model, separating mastery-approach, performance-approach,and performance-avoidance goals, fitted the German students’ data best. In Sweden, the three-factor model and a two factormodel combining the two performance goals fitted the data equally well. However, the correlation between the performance approach and avoidance goals in the Swedish three-factor model was not significantly different from 1 and we thus considered the separation to lack practical significance. We discuss national culture, and other variables, as explanations for the differences in achievement goal factor structures.

Keywords
Motivation, Achievement goal theory, Goals, Measurement, National culture, Comparative study
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work; didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151492 (URN)
Conference
International Conference on Motivation (ICM) 2018, Aarhus, Denmark, August 15-17, 2018
Projects
DoLiS
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013-2180
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2020-03-03Bibliographically approved
Hofverberg, A. & Winberg, M. T. (2017). Achievement goal factor structure among chemistry students in Grade 5 – 11: A comparison between Sweden and Germany. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Research Symposium on Science Education (NFSUN) 2017, Trondheim, Norway,June 7-9, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Achievement goal factor structure among chemistry students in Grade 5 – 11: A comparison between Sweden and Germany
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this study, the factor structure of German and Swedish students’ achievement goals in chemistry were investigated. The national culture of Germany and Sweden are very different in the masculinity versus femininity dimension, expressing the level of competitiveness and the way performance is evaluated in the society. Therefore, the structure of students’ achievement goals, in part based on their evaluation of performance, may very well differ between the countries. The results showed that a three-factor CFA model, separating mastery-approach, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals, fitted the German data best. In Sweden, the three-factor model and a two-factor model combining the two performance goals fitted the data equally well. However, the correlation between the performance approach and avoidance goals in the Swedish three-factor model was not significantly different from 1 and the separation thus lacked practical significance. Further, the same pattern was repeated for grade 5 – 11 individually within each country. Measurement invariance between grades within the countries support an invariant factor structure, and thus age-independent factor structures. We argue that differences in factor structures between the two countries are related to the differences in national culture.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
didactics of natural science; educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139482 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Research Symposium on Science Education (NFSUN) 2017, Trondheim, Norway,June 7-9, 2017
Projects
DoLiS
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2013-2180
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2018-12-03
Projects
Cognition, beliefs, interests and motivation in chemistry secondary education - a comparison between school years 5-11 in Sweden and Germany [2013-02180_VR]; Umeå University; Publications
Hofverberg, A. & Winberg, M. (2019). Interplay between achievement goals and goal structures: Effects on achievement and motivation. In: Book of Abstracts EARLI 2019: . Paper presented at The 18th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI2019), 12–16 August, 2019, Aachen, Germany. Winberg, M. T., Hofverberg, A., Lindfors, M., Parchmann, I., Bernholt, A., Bernholt, S., . . . Kampa, N. (2019). Kognition, kunskapssyn, intresse och motivation i kemi: en jämförelse av elevers utveckling över skolåren 5–10 i Sverige och Tyskland. In: Resultatdialog 2019: (pp. 112-116). Stockholm: VetenskapsrådetHofverberg, A. & Winberg, M. T.Achievement goals and classroom goal structures: Do they need to match?. Hofverberg, A. & Winberg, M. T.Are mastery structures beneficial for everyone?: The interaction between mastery structures and achievement goals in grades 6-10.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1535-873X

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