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Enarsson, T. & Lindgren, S. (2019). Free speech or hate speech?: A legal analysis of the discourse about Roma on Twitter. Information & communications technology law, 28(1), 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Free speech or hate speech?: A legal analysis of the discourse about Roma on Twitter
2019 (English)In: Information & communications technology law, ISSN 1360-0834, E-ISSN 1469-8404, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article draws on material gathered from Swedish tweets about the Roma population, in order to map different discourses. Based on this material, a legal analysis was made focusing on how the legal protection under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and Swedish law for such types of expression may vary depending on the wider discursive context. This article concludes that the legal protection for hateful expressions against for instance Roma, will vary depending on the discursive context. When the expression is a direct part of a political discussion, the protection of freedom of expression will be higher. However, emphasis must also be placed on the aim, value, and accuracy of the statement, even in a political context. This will increase the possibilities to legally intervene against speech that may perhaps be triggered by an ongoing political debate, but is hateful and without value to that debate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Hate speech, freedom of expression, Roma, social media, discourse, text analysis
National Category
Law (excluding Law and Society) Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Law; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150044 (URN)10.1080/13600834.2018.1494415 (DOI)000469856300001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04195The Swedish Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority, 2605/2013
Available from: 2018-07-04 Created: 2018-07-04 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, S. (2019). Movement Mobilization in the Age of Hashtag Activism: Examining the Challenge of Noise, Hate, and Disengagement in the #MeToo Campaign. Policy & Internet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Movement Mobilization in the Age of Hashtag Activism: Examining the Challenge of Noise, Hate, and Disengagement in the #MeToo Campaign
2019 (English)In: Policy & Internet, ISSN 1944-2866, E-ISSN 1944-2866Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article analyses the challenges faced by the #MeToo campaign, during its first weeks of existence on Twitter. These included the challenges of maintaining its frame, and making a consistent impact in a complex and volatile media landscape. This mixed-methods study draws on a data set of four million tweets accessed through Twitter's public data interface. It addresses the following research questions: To what degree did the #MeToo campaign on Twitter have a clear focus, and was it able to maintain it? How did the tone of the campaign on Twitter change over time, in terms of the positivity or negativity of expressed sentiments? To what extent were tweets simply reiterated, or instead made the subject of customization and active debate? The article finds that #MeToo quickly started to lose its momentum after the initial and explosive impact, with noise, antagonism, and sloganization increasingly weighing down and diluting the campaign. However, a cross-platform perspective is needed to grasp a full picture of how hashtag activism functions; including the #MeToo campaign.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Social media, mobilization, politics, #MeToo, social movements
National Category
Sociology Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162879 (URN)10.1002/poi3.212 (DOI)000479721900001 ()
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-09-05
Lindgren, S. (2018). A ghost in the machine: tracing the role of "the digital' in discursive processes of cybervictimisation. Discourse & Communication, 12(5), 517-534
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A ghost in the machine: tracing the role of "the digital' in discursive processes of cybervictimisation
2018 (English)In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 517-534Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study of discursive understandings of cybervictimisation draws on a dataset of crime news reporting and asks the question of if and how cybervictimisation is construed in ways that differ from other types of (non-digital) victimisation. Building on a critical discourse perspective employing corpus-based text analysis methods, the composition of news discourses about cybervictimisation are analysed, alongside the relationship between such representations and news media discourse on crime victimisation generally. The aim is to see what effect the presence of a digital dimension has for how the notion of victimisation is socially and culturally understood. The study shows, first, that news reporting on cybervictimisation has a strong bias towards crimes that fit well with the notion of the ideal victim' (such as sexual victimisation and bullying) while excluding other types like hacking and identity theft. The question is raised whether victim' discourse is able to account for the latter types or if new understandings and concepts will emerge. Second, the study shows that discourses promoting understandings of technology as contributing to amplifying danger, and that represent technology as potentially undermining social order, are strong in cybervictimisation news reports. These discourses are consequential for who is seen as a legitimate victim and not. Just as it can be very difficult to identify and apprehend perpetrators of cybercrime, so is also the identification and definition of cybervictims ambiguous and demands to be further researched.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Internet, victimisation, topic modelling, CDS
National Category
Communication Studies Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152193 (URN)10.1177/1750481318766936 (DOI)000443973600004 ()
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Krutrök, M. & Lindgren, S. (2018). Continued contexts of terror: analyzing temporal patterns of hashtag co-occurrence as discursive articulations. Social Media + Society, 4(4), Article ID 2056305118813649.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continued contexts of terror: analyzing temporal patterns of hashtag co-occurrence as discursive articulations
2018 (English)In: Social Media + Society, ISSN 2056-3051, E-ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 4, no 4, article id 2056305118813649Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study looks at how terror attacks are rendered discursively meaningful on social media through the concurrent use and reiteration of terror hashtags, which were created following previous incidents of terror. The article focuses on 12 terror attacks in Europe in 2015-2017 and their relating hashtags on Twitter, to see how various combinations of these were reused and co-articulated in tweets posted in relation to subsequent attacks. Through social network analysis of co-occurring hashtags in about 3 million tweets, in combination with close readings of a smaller sample, this study aims to analyze both the networks of hashtags in relation to terror attacks as well as the discursive process of hashtag co-articulation. The study shows that the patterns by which attack hashtags are reused and co-articulated depend on both temporal and contextual differences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
terror attacks, social media, discourse, articulation, framing
National Category
Social Sciences Other Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153537 (URN)10.1177/2056305118813649 (DOI)000451326700001 ()
Funder
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Merrill, S. & Lindgren, S. (2018). The rhythms of social movement memories: the mobilization of Silvio Meier’s activist remembrance across platforms. Social Movement Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The rhythms of social movement memories: the mobilization of Silvio Meier’s activist remembrance across platforms
2018 (English)In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article presents a temporal analysis of the activist remembrance of Silvio Meier, a prominent member of Berlin’s radical left scene, who was stabbed to death in 1992. It asks: when has Meier’s activist remembrance occurred and been remediated, with what rhythms, and how has it been influenced by different platforms? To answer these questions, the article draws on the literature dedicated to the interface between social movements and collective and connective memory, and applies Lefebvre’s rhythmanalysis approach. Within this approach a diverse set of material is used to visualise the timing of the digital and non-digital remediation and mobilisation of Meier’s remembrance across different platforms of memory including commemorative events, newspapers, websites and social media. Thereafter the various temporalities of use associated with these platforms and how they can influence the mobilisation of remembrance by social movements is discussed using Lefebvre’s concepts of polyrhythmia, arrhythmia, isorhythmia, eurhythmia and with respect to, firstly, a fifteen-year period between 2002 and 2017 and secondly, a fifteen-day period between 15 November and 30 November 2012 around the twentieth anniversary of Meier’s death. The article concludes by introducing another Lefebvrian concept – dressage – in order to consider which rhythms of activist remembrance might most benefit social movements and their goals. Overall, by demonstrating the importance of attending to the when and not only the what, who, where and how of social movement memories and by highlighting the need to consider the temporal influence of the different digital and non-digital platforms that activists use, as well as, by indicating the broader potential of applying rhythmanalysis approaches to instances of activism, the article has broader relevance for the further study of social movements, their use of different media and their mobilization of memory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
activist remembrance, platforms of memory, social media, rhythmanalysis, social movement memories, Silvio Meier
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
media and communication studies; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152753 (URN)10.1080/14742837.2018.1534680 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-04-05
Kania-Lundholm, M. & Lindgren, S. (2017). Beyond the nation-state Polish national identity and cultural intimacy online. National Identities, 19(3), 293-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond the nation-state Polish national identity and cultural intimacy online
2017 (English)In: National Identities, ISSN 1460-8944, E-ISSN 1469-9907, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 293-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses the debate on ;new patriotism' in a Polish online discussion forum. We study the ways in which national identity is constructed in this setting. Digital communication contributes further to expanding discourse on national identities beyond nation-state borders. We analyse close to 6000 posts from a large Polish Internet discussion forum through the methods of quantitative concept mapping and qualitative close readings. Our results show that patriotism is negotiated beyond strictly national frameworks. It is not merely a question of national interest as it also connects people through a process of establishing and maintaining of cultural intimacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
national identity, online forums, Poland, patriotism, cultural intimacy
National Category
Cultural Studies Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144983 (URN)10.1080/14608944.2015.1108958 (DOI)000423995400001 ()
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, M. & Lindgren, S. (2017). Challenging the roles of “skilled” professionals and “risky” young mothers: peer support, expertise, and relational patterns in Facebook groups. Journal of technology in human services, 35(3), 247-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenging the roles of “skilled” professionals and “risky” young mothers: peer support, expertise, and relational patterns in Facebook groups
2017 (English)In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 247-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, many countries spend a great deal of money and effort on programs for expert-guided parenting support to be carried out in face-to-face groups. One goal of such support is to target, help, and educate “risky” groups of parents, such as young parents. It is striking, however, that young parents have a conspicuously low degree of participation in this type of parenting support. Drawing on the assumption that many young parents go online to seek, give, and receive peer parenting support, this paper presents a case study of activities within three Facebook groups. Using a combination of social network analysis, online ethnography, and interviews, we analyze how social network relationships and discussions differ depending on whether the analyzed Facebook group in question is administrated by professionals or peers, what the role of professional experts is, and how young parents might use social media to take control of their own support needs. Our results indicate that some of the affordances provided by Facebook might contribute to a challenging of the roles of “skilled” professionals versus “risky” young parents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Online support groups, parenting, social media, young mothers
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139653 (URN)10.1080/15228835.2017.1367350 (DOI)000416747100006 ()
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Örestig, J. & Lindgren, S. (2017). Local moral economies: the space, place, and locality of social media mobilisation. Globalizations, 14(6), 884-895
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local moral economies: the space, place, and locality of social media mobilisation
2017 (English)In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 884-895Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study is a case study of a locally rooted environmental campaign on the Swedish island of Gotland. We aim to enhance the understanding of how locality is manifested in social movements that emerge in today’s networked world. We analyse how the double goals of speaking to, as well as beyond, the local context came into expression in the movement's social media activities. We draw on data from tweets and Facebook posts and include interactions between activists and critics as well as the resources linked to in the posts. Analysis indicate that the conflict must be seen as spanning across local, national and global levels. In line with earlier research, activists used social media to link their struggle with other struggles. Also, it was used to charge the local struggle with symbolic content by framing it as one of many struggles between local communities, authorities and multinational corporations. Beyond this, posts from the island signalled dedication to the history and long-term interests of the community. We argue that future studies should recognise the crucial role that reciprocity norms in the local community can play for outcomes of conflicts and that the notion of a 'local moral economy' can be used to reach a deeper understanding of this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
social media, activism, mining struggles, moral economy
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Globalisation Studies
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129039 (URN)10.1080/14747731.2017.1286175 (DOI)000410786300013 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Richardson, L.-J. & Lindgren, S. (2017). Online tribes and digital authority: what can social theory bring to digital archaeology?. Open Archaeology, 3(1), 139-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online tribes and digital authority: what can social theory bring to digital archaeology?
2017 (English)In: Open Archaeology, E-ISSN 2300-6560, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

From early discussions of the disruptive potential of computer technologies for archaeological applications, to the present era of digital archaeology as the technical underpinning of modern archaeological practice, we have continued to debate the potential impacts of digital communication and digital capture and storage on our knowledge, profession and communications. The increased use of digital tools and methods for archaeological research and dissemination, as well as what Roosevelt (2015) has referred to as the shift to the digital paradigm within archaeological practice, leads us to suggest that the impact of this paradigm shift requires careful and critical examination. This article will examine the edges of the disciplines of archaeology and sociology, where we aim to advance our understanding of the relationship between digital technologies and archaeological knowledge from a uniquely social perspective, using the theoretical approaches of both classic and modern sociologists. The application of this lens of sociology to digital archaeology equips us to understand how archaeology and archaeological practice is situated in a social world, which is especially relevant in the Global West, where digital technology is ubiquitous. Through a critical consideration of the complexity of use of digital technologies within digital archaeology, we can begin to shift our focus away from the character and method of tools and workflow, to the background of intellectual power and influence. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Warsaw: De Gruyter Open, 2017
Keywords
sociology, digital archaeology, social media, theory, archaeological practice
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Human Aspects of ICT
Research subject
Archaeology; medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139939 (URN)10.1515/opar-2017-0008 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, S. & Cocq, C. (2017). Turning the inside out: social media and the broadcasting of indigenous discourse. European Journal of Communication, 32(2), 131-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turning the inside out: social media and the broadcasting of indigenous discourse
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 131-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses what happens on social media (Twitter) when a local issue specific to a certain Indigenous group spreads out to a wider network of actors. We look closer at the process where emic (inside) discourses are enabled, through social media, to reach a broader audience and become part of translocal debates. In a case study of information sharing, network building and support on Twitter in relation to a series of Sámi anti-mining protests in 2013, we address questions about the dynamics, flows and process of Indigenous communication on Twitter. First, we analyse in what ways and to what extent the posts are used for inreach communication or outreach communication. Second, we analyse the role of tweets that contain links to web resources for broadcasting Indigenous concerns to a wider, more diverse audience. Finally, we assess how different types of actors interact in order to shape the circulation of content. Our analysis shows even though communication went beyond the core community, Sámi actors still appeared to own and control the discourse and agenda on the issue in social media. Obviously, online communities are not secluded communities. For geographically localized groups and for marginalized communities, the use of global social media does not only enable communication with actors in more distant groups and places; social media also makes visible common interests and goals on a global scale. The possibility of addressing multiple audiences at the same time increases the potential of reaching an audience outside one’s set of 'followers' or one's tight-knit communities of like-minded people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Indigenous media, inreach vs outreach communication, protest movements, Sámi culture, social media
National Category
Other Humanities Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133299 (URN)10.1177/0267323116674112 (DOI)000400086900004 ()
Available from: 2017-04-03 Created: 2017-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
Social Media and Political Participation [2010-00204_Forte]; Umeå UniversityHow can knowledge about social peer-support on the Internet inform future interventions for young people with mental ill health? [2014-10069_VR]; Umeå UniversityAdvancing Social Media Studies: Towards a Consolidation of the Field [F14-0521:1_RJ]; Umeå UniversitySocial Media Elites: Mapping informal political influence online [2016-02971_VR]; Umeå UniversityHARVEST: eHealth and Ageing in Rural Areas: Transforming Everyday Life, Digital Competences, and Technology [2017-02304_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6289-9427

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