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Buckland, Philip I., Dr.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2430-0839
Alternative names
Biography [eng]

I am Vice Dean of Reserach and Research Infrastructure at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Umeå University. Also Director of (ArchLab, the National Infrastructure for Archaeological Science) and a senior lecturer at The Environmental Archaeology Lab, an infrastructure actively involved in archaeological research, development and consultancy throughout Scandinavia. I run the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD), a research infrastructure for studies on past environmental change, climate change and human activity, and part of Swedigarch, the Swedigarch National Infrastructure for Digital Archaeology. My research interests parallel the scope of the database and includes the use of biological proxies, particularly fossil insects, to reconstruct Quaternary environmental and climate change, especially when related to past human activities. I am also interested in the use of palaeoentomology, the study of fossil insects, for the study of past biodiversity, and in relation to modern conservation policy and activities. I co-authored the BugsCEP database and software>, and am interested in the development and study of research data infrastructures, in particular the use of big data in archaeology and palaeoecology.

Biography [swe]

Jag är Vicedekan för forskning och forskningsinfrastruktur vid Humanistiska fakulteten, Umeå universitet. Utöver detta är jag föreståndare för ArchLab, den nationella infrastrukturen för laborativ arkeologi och verksam vid Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet, en infrastruktur för forskning, utveckling och uppdrag som är aktivt involverad i arkeologisk forskning, utveckling och uppdrag genom hela Skandinavien. Jag driver den strategiska miljöarkeologiska databasen (SEAD), en forskningsinfrastruktur för studier av tidigare miljöförändringar, klimatförändringar och mänsklig aktivitet och en del i Swedigarch, den nationella infrastrukturen för digital arkeologi. Mina forskningsintressen är relaterat till databasens omfång och inkluderar användningen av biologiska proxys, särskilt fossila insekter, för rekonstruktion av kvartära miljö- och klimatförändringar, särskilt när det gäller tidigare mänskliga aktiviteter. Jag är också intresserad av användningen av paleoentomologi, analys av fossila insekter, för att studera tidigare biologisk mångfald och i förhållande till modern naturvård. Jag är medförfattare till BugsCEP-databasen och programvaran och är intresserad av utveckling av och forskning kring forskningsdatainfrastrukturer, särskilt användningen av 'big data' inom arkeologi och paleoekologi.

Publications (10 of 103) Show all publications
Pilotto, F., Gholamrezaie, E., Weegar, R., Rojas, A. & Buckland, P. I. (2024). Biodiversity shifts: data-driven insights from modern ecology, archaeology, and quaternary sciences. In: : . Paper presented at SBDI Days 2024 Towards Data-driven Ecology, Stockholm, Sweden, 24-25 January, 2024..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biodiversity shifts: data-driven insights from modern ecology, archaeology, and quaternary sciences
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2024 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

To understand the implications of past changes in climate, landscape and human activity on contemporary biodiversity patterns, data from modern and palaeoecological studies must be connected. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD) provides access to big data from archaeology and Quaternary science and is an enormous potential resource for investigating past changes in biodiversity. By linking SEAD to SBDI, past species distributions can be analysed for their implications for landscape and climate change. Recent macroecological research using SEAD/ SBDI illustrates trends in Late Holocene anthropogenic landscape change in north-western Europe. Over the past few thousand years, humans have impacted insect biodiversity as much as climate change did after the last Ice Age. This demonstrates that data from archaeology, and the consequences of human activity, are essential for fulfilling the promi- se of using data driven ecology for guiding future conservation practices in response to climate change. 

National Category
Ecology Computational Mathematics Archaeology Environmental Sciences Geology Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-220075 (URN)
Conference
SBDI Days 2024 Towards Data-driven Ecology, Stockholm, Sweden, 24-25 January, 2024.
Projects
SwedigarchSBDI
Available from: 2024-01-26 Created: 2024-01-26 Last updated: 2024-01-29Bibliographically approved
Sjölander, M., Linderholm, J., Geladi, P. & Buckland, P. I. (2024). Quartzite complexities: Non-destructive analysis of bifacial points from Västerbotten, Sweden. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 53, Article ID 104381.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quartzite complexities: Non-destructive analysis of bifacial points from Västerbotten, Sweden
2024 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 53, article id 104381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Northern Fennoscandia is a geologically complex region affected by both glacial and postglacial processes. Quartzite was a key material type utilized by hunter-gatherers in Northern Sweden around the period 4 000 – 2 000 BP, and is thus critical to the understanding of raw material procurement and material flow within the region. However, there is a severe lack of methodological development in the characterization of these materials, and provenance of locally available geological material is complex and fraught with uncertainty. 126 quartz/quartzite points and preforms were sampled from 47 archaeological sites along the upper Ångerman river valley in Västerbotten, Sweden. The material has been analysed non-destructively using three separate portable spectroscopic instrumentations (Near-infrared, Raman, X-Ray Fluorescence). Evaluation of the spectra and exploratory data analysis using Principal Component Analysis demonstrates detectable differences in the material that likely stem from diagenetic/paragenetic origin. The presence of graphite, muscovite and biotite could likewise provide information on the material’s metamorphic grade. In addition to reaffirming the potential of field-based screening instrumentation, these results will benefit future surveys of geological sources in the region. They also indicate potential for the construction of a predictive model that could classify the quartzite based on its chemical characteristic. Such a model would prove useful in future spatial analysis and testing of models of raw material management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
archaeology, spectroscopy, chemometrics, quartzite, bifacial point, Sweden
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-219848 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2024.104381 (DOI)2-s2.0-85183532858 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-22 Created: 2024-01-22 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved
Östman, S., Linderholm, J., Buckland, P., Hristova, I., Monzon, M., Eriksson, L. & Wallin, J.-E. (2023). Miljöarkeologiska analyser av prover från L1988:5459, Innerstaden 2:1/Mårtenstorget, Lund stad och kommun, Skåne. Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Miljöarkeologiska analyser av prover från L1988:5459, Innerstaden 2:1/Mårtenstorget, Lund stad och kommun, Skåne
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2023 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2023. p. 8
Series
Environmental Archaeology Laboratory Reports ; 2023-035
Keywords
archaeobotany, pollen analysis, 14C, insect analysis, XRF analysis, Sweden
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
environmental archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218333 (URN)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Edvardsson, J., Hansson, A., Sjölander, M., von Boer, J., Buckland, P. I., Linderson, H., . . . Hammarlund, D. (2023). Old wood in a new light: an online dendrochronological database. International Journal of Wood Culture, 3(1-3), 442-463
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Old wood in a new light: an online dendrochronological database
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Wood Culture, ISSN 2772-3194, Vol. 3, no 1-3, p. 442-463Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Old Wood in a New Light database project focuses on the digitization and accessibility of the results of dendrochronological samples analyzed and archived at four Swedish university-based tree-ring laboratories at Lund University, Stockholm University, University of Gothenburg, and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Collaboration with the Environmental Archaeology Laboratory and Humlab at Umeå University enables long-term open access to data, raw data, and metadata. In this project, we (1) systematically undertake large-scale entry and open access publication of results from wood samples scientifically analyzed and archived by Swedish laboratories and the associated metadata, into the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD; www.sead.se) research data infrastructure, and (2) actively promote the database as a resource for new and ongoing interdisciplinary research initiatives. Including dendrochronological data in SEAD infrastructure allows interdisciplinary studies that combine major scientific and societal questions. Building on a pilot study of construction timber from southern Sweden and adaptation of SEAD digitization workflows, more than 70 000 samples archived at the four dendrochronological laboratories are now being handled in the project. The broad coverage of research networks, stakeholder interaction, and strategic support from the cultural heritage community is guaranteed owing to the ongoing collaboration between laboratories and an established international and multidisciplinary reference group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill Academic Publishers, 2023
Keywords
archaeology, cultural heritage, dendrochronology, open data, Sweden, timber, tree rings
National Category
History and Archaeology Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries Climate Research Wood Science Geology
Research subject
Archaeology; environmental archaeology; Earth Sciences with Specialization Environmental Analysis; climate change; data science; cultural heritage
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-201875 (URN)10.1163/27723194-bja10009 (DOI)
Projects
Old wood in a new lightSEAD
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, IN20-0026Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, IN15-0231:1Swedish Research Council, 2007-7494Swedish Research Council, 2010-5976
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-07-13Bibliographically approved
Buckland, P. I. & Buckland, P. C. (2023). Pitfall trapping at Gården Under Sandet (GUS) 1995, Western Greenland. Norwegian Journal of Entomology, 70(2), 158-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pitfall trapping at Gården Under Sandet (GUS) 1995, Western Greenland
2023 (English)In: Norwegian Journal of Entomology, ISSN 1501-8415, E-ISSN 1894-0692, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 158-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During archaeological excavations on the site of the Norse farm at Gården under Sandet (GUS), in Ameralik Fjord, south-west Greenland, the opportunity was taken to sample the modern ground-living insect fauna by pitfall trapping from a range of natural habitats for comparison with fossil assemblages from the medieval farm and its midden. Two species, the predatory bug Nabis flavomarginatus Scholtz, 1847 and small ladybird Nephus redtenbacheri Mulsant, 1846 are recorded for the first time in this part of Greenland, although there are earlier records from the sediments associated with medieval farms in the region and both have been regarded as Norse introductions. The minute staphylinid Mycetoporus nigrans Mäklin, 1853, added to the Greenland list from this material by Peter Hammond (in Buckland et al. 1998), was found to be common in most natural habitats around GUS. Grids of eight traps, four at ground level and four on posts, were set out in six localities defined by their vegetational characteristics and emptied three times over the month-long sampling period. The cicadellid Psammotettix lividellus (Zetterstedt, 1840) appeared in all ground traps being particularly abundant on the dwarf birch and sedge dominated floodplain, to which the polyphagous mirid bug Chlamydatus pullus (Reuter, 1870) appears confined.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Norwegian Entomological Society, 2023
Keywords
Insects, beetles, pitfall traps, Greenland, archaeological excavation
National Category
Ecology Zoology Archaeology Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Entomology; environmental archaeology; Quarternary Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218244 (URN)2-s2.0-85193508471 (Scopus ID)
Note

Insect collection connected with the archaeological excavation of Gården Under Sandet (GUS) in Greenland, 1995.

Published versions made available online ca 6 months after printing.

Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2024-06-05Bibliographically approved
Allen, D., Bateman, M., Buckland, P. C., Buckland, P. I., Hartmann, D. & Coope, R. (2023). Stratigraphy, dates and insect faunas from the Lateglacial site at Barmston, East Yorkshire. The Naturalist, 148, 81-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stratigraphy, dates and insect faunas from the Lateglacial site at Barmston, East Yorkshire
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2023 (English)In: The Naturalist, ISSN 0028-0771, Vol. 148, p. 81-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Late Quaternary deposits on the Yorkshire coast southwards from Sewerby Cliff in Bridlington Bay to Dimlington north of Spurn Point (Figs. 1a-1c, p82) have been the subject of stratigraphic and palaeontological research for well over a century (Bateman et al., 2011; Catt, 2007 and references therein, Evans et al., 1995). The region contains the type-site for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Britain at Dimlington (Rose, 1985) and extensive outcrops of at least three glacial diamicts, locally the Basement, Skipsea and Withernsea Tills, indicating the dynamic nature of the North Sea ice lobe during the final stages of the British and Irish Icesheet (BIIS). Work by Bateman et al. (2015) indicates that the Skipsea and Withernsea Tills represent icesheets that were present across Holderness for less than 6 ka between 20.9 and 15.1 ka BP before retreating north and east. However, the deglaciation remains insufficiently constrained, with a hiatus between the preserved glacial deposits and the earliest Lateglacial sequences at Gransmoor and Roos Bog (Walker et al., 1993; Beckett, 1981). Organic sediments directly overlying glacial till have been examined at Barmston which provide additional evidence of Lateglacial environments and climate in Holderness. This paper presents fossil insect and chronological evidence from coastal exposures from which climatic reconstructions can be made.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Yorkshire Naturalists' Union, 2023
Keywords
Quaternary geology, entomology, palaeoentomology, fossil insects, OSL dating, Yorkshire, Lateglacial
National Category
Geology Zoology
Research subject
environmental archaeology; Quarternary Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218256 (URN)
Note

Issues are published open access after 2 years.

Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Hey, D., Buckland, P. C., Buckland, P. I., Gearey, B., O'Neill, R. & Tyers, I. (2023). The Conisbrough Estate and the southern boundary of Northumbria: environmental and archaeological evidence from a late sixth-/early seventh-century structure and a later enclosure ditch at Conisbrough, South Yorkshire (23ed.). In: Helena Hamerow (Ed.), Anglo-Saxon studies in archaeology and history 23: (pp. 167-205). Oxford: Archaeopress
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Conisbrough Estate and the southern boundary of Northumbria: environmental and archaeological evidence from a late sixth-/early seventh-century structure and a later enclosure ditch at Conisbrough, South Yorkshire
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2023 (English)In: Anglo-Saxon studies in archaeology and history 23 / [ed] Helena Hamerow, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2023, 23, p. 167-205Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Excavations close to the Anglo-Saxon church at Conisbrough, South Yorkshire, UK, revealed a plank-walled construction dated by dendrochronology to the late sixth or early seventh century. It is suggested that this formed part of a stock pond for fish, associated with an elite residence to which a partly surviving Anglo-Saxon church incorporating Northumbrian features is related. Environmental evidence shows a neglected wood pasture landscape associated with the infilling of a ditch which cuts through the structure. This is likely to be related either to a burh centred on the church or to a deer park established shortly after the Norman Conquest and associated with the castle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Archaeopress, 2023 Edition: 23
Series
Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History, ISSN 0264-5254 ; 3
Keywords
Palaeoentomology, boundaries, castle, Anglo-Saxon, Church, Environmental archaeology, dendrochronology, ditch, deer park
National Category
Archaeology History Zoology Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Research subject
environmental archaeology; History; Entomology; Quarternary Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-218271 (URN)10.2307/jj.8501575.9 (DOI)9781789698916 (ISBN)9781803275598 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Stilborg, O., Sjölander, M. & Buckland, P. I. (2023). Upscaling ceramic thin sections through a database: a multi-site analysis of organic tempers in Swedish prehistoric pottery. Archeologica data, 3, 85-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upscaling ceramic thin sections through a database: a multi-site analysis of organic tempers in Swedish prehistoric pottery
2023 (English)In: Archeologica data, ISSN 2785-0307, Vol. 3, p. 85-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The inclusion of ceramic thin section data from multiple sites in the SEAD environmentalarchaeology database provides an opportunity for not only examining the distribution of organic temperin Sweden, but also for an analysis of the pros and cons of research using a large-scale data infrastructure.This paper uses an extract of over 40 years of semi-quantitative data, primarily collected at the now disbandedCeramics Research Laboratory in Lund, to examine the evidence for the use of organic tempersin Swedish pottery. These observations are interpreted in terms of the craft traditions in the region’s prehistory,discussed with respect to their potential implications, and put in the context of similar traditionsin Asia. The discussion points to a limited, selective transference of organic tempering technology fromthe east to Sweden. The experience of the authors in digitising and working with these data is then usedas the basis for a discussion on the challenges and potentials of using large-scale multi-site databases forsynthesis research. The conclusion is that the potential for creating and exploring new lines of enquiryinto the material outweighs the difficulties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sesto Fiorentino: All’Insegna del Giglio, 2023
Keywords
Ceramic thin sections, organic temper, database, pottery, synthesis, prehistory, Sweden, Eastern craft tradition
National Category
Geology Archaeology Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Archaeology; environmental archaeology; gender studies; Scandinavian Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-210296 (URN)10.13131/unipi/p0vs-gg31 (DOI)
Projects
SEAD
Available from: 2023-06-20 Created: 2023-06-20 Last updated: 2023-06-21Bibliographically approved
Buckland, P. I., Steers, A. & Buckland, P. C. (2022). A re-assessment of numbers. The case of Cantley Kilns 33–4 and 37–9 using EVEs and comparing vessel counts between two sampling events. In: Steven Willis (Ed.), Journal of Roman Pottery Studies Volume 19: (pp. 147-164). Oxbow Books, 9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A re-assessment of numbers. The case of Cantley Kilns 33–4 and 37–9 using EVEs and comparing vessel counts between two sampling events
2022 (English)In: Journal of Roman Pottery Studies Volume 19 / [ed] Steven Willis, Oxbow Books, 2022, Vol. 9, p. 147-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The selective archiving of pottery sherds in museums is rarely analysed with respect to its potential impact on subsequent re-analysis. An undergraduate dissertation on pottery groups from the production site at Cantley provided an opportunity to test this empirically. Two quantification events are thus explored through simple statistical and visualisation methods and the implications of different quantification methods, including the use of EVE (Estimated Vessel Equivalents), discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxbow Books, 2022
Series
Journal of Roman Pottery Studies, ISSN 0958-3491 ; 19
Keywords
South Yorkshire, Cantley, Roman period, pottery production, museum archives, quantification
National Category
Archaeology Classical Archaeology and Ancient History
Research subject
Archaeology; Statistics; digital humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-196677 (URN)9781789258264 (ISBN)9781789258257 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-06-16 Created: 2022-06-16 Last updated: 2022-06-30Bibliographically approved
Buckland, P. I. & Sjölander, M. (2022). Approaches to research data infrastructure for archaeological science. In: Goldstein, Lynne; Watrall, Ethan (Ed.), Digital heritage and archaeology in practice: data, ethics, and professionalism (pp. 109-134). University Press of Florida
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Approaches to research data infrastructure for archaeological science
2022 (English)In: Digital heritage and archaeology in practice: data, ethics, and professionalism / [ed] Goldstein, Lynne; Watrall, Ethan, University Press of Florida, 2022, p. 109-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A significant number of archaeology’s Grand Challenges (Kintigh et al. 2014) can only be addressed through access to large amounts of data from multiple research fields, and advanced tools for aggregating, synthesizing and analyzing them. Archaeological research has seen significant developments in the use of databases and database tools since first adopting them in the late 1960s (Lock 2003). The often small scale of archaeological budgets, and the paucity of long-term funding, has meant that cheaper solutions have most often been used. These have ranged from mainstream database management systems through university site licenses and project specific purchases, to independently coded solutions and more recent open source alternatives. The relatively unusual nature and complexity of archaeological science (see Lidén 2017) data has meant that custom database designs have been the norm. The vast majority of these databases have been built to serve single purposes: from simple sample processing archives, to more complete excavation databases or multi-site macrofossil databases. User interfaces, if present, usually reflect these aims rather than provide for wider audiences. Such databases are an extremely important part of how science is now conducted, and, as explained in this chapter, there are considerable advantages to upscaling them towards becoming components in research infrastructure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University Press of Florida, 2022
Keywords
database design, FAIR, laboratory, palaeoecology, archaeology
National Category
Archaeology Computer Sciences
Research subject
environmental archaeology; Archaeology; data science; cultural heritage; Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-200459 (URN)978-0-8130-6930-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-10-20 Created: 2022-10-20 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved
Projects
The development of analysis and visualisation tools for database orientated environmental archaeological, palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic studies. [2009-06338_VR]; Umeå UniversitySEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database [2010-05976_VR]; Umeå UniversityVISEAD: Pushing the cutting edge of the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database SEAD: new research areas and users for interdisciplinary studies of global challenges [IN15-0231:1_RJ]; Umeå University; Publications
Opitz, R., Strawhacker, C., Buckland, P. I., Cothren, J., Dawson, T., Dugmore, A., . . . Thompson, P. (2021). A Lockpick's Guide to dataARC: Designing Infrastructures and Building Communities to Enable Transdisciplinary Research. Internet Archaeology, 56
Urdar. A research infrastructure for archaeological excavation data [In19-0135:1_RJ]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2430-0839