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Fischer, A., Johansson, I., Blomberg, A. & Sundström, B. (2019). Adherence to a Mediterranean-like Diet as a Protective Factor Against COPD: A Nested Case-Control Study. COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to a Mediterranean-like Diet as a Protective Factor Against COPD: A Nested Case-Control Study
2019 (English)In: COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1541-2555, E-ISSN 1541-2563Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A diet rich in nutrients has been suggested to have protective effects against the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the traditional Mediterranean diet is high in nutrients, including antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, it is of interest to study as a protective factor against COPD. Our aim was therefore to study its associations with development of COPD using population-based prospective data from the Vasterbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) cohort. Data on diet from 370 individuals, who later visited the Department of Medicine at the University Hospital, Umea, Sweden, with a diagnosis of COPD, were compared to 1432 controls. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed by a modified version of the Mediterranean diet score (MDS). Cases were diagnosed with COPD 11.1 years (mean) (standard deviation [SD] 4.5 years) after first stating their dietary habits in the VIP at a mean age of 55.5 years (SD 6.6 years). Higher MDS was associated with a higher level of education and not living alone. After adjustment for co-habiting and education level, individuals with an intermediate MDS and those with the highest MDS had a lower odds of developing COPD (odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.95; OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37-0.86, respectively). These results remained also after adjustment for smoking intensity, i.e., numbers of cigarettes smoked per day (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-0.99; OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-0.97), respectively). To conclude, adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet seems to be inversely associated with the development of COPD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
COPD, dietary habit, Mediterranean diet, nutrients
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162857 (URN)10.1080/15412555.2019.1634039 (DOI)000481171500001 ()31405301 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2019-09-06
Eriksson, L., Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries. Nutrients, 11(7), Article ID 1491.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taste and diet preferences are complex and influenced by both environmental and host traits while affecting both food selection and associated health outcomes. The present study genotyped 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in previously reported taste and food intake related genes and assessed associations with taste threshold (TT) and preferred intensity (PT) of sweet, sour and bitter, food preferences, habitual diet intake, and caries status in healthy young Swedish men and women (n = 127). Polymorphisms in the GNAT3, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes were associated with variation in TT and PT for sweet taste as well as sweet food intake. Increasing PT for sweet was associated with increasing preference and intake of sugary foods. Similarly, increasing TT for sour was associated with increasing intake of sour foods, whereas the associations between food preference/intake and TT/PT for bitter was weak in this study group. Finally, allelic variation in the GNAT3, SLC2A2, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes was associated with caries status, whereas TT, PT and food preferences were not. It was concluded that variations in taste receptor, glucose transporter and gustducin encoding genes are related to taste perception, food preference and intake as well as the sugar-dependent caries disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
taste perception, taste preference, taste genes, diet preference, diet selection, caries
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162681 (URN)10.3390/nu11071491 (DOI)000478885400090 ()31261961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Ramne, S., Dias, J. A., González-Padilla, E., Olsson, K., Lindahl, B., Engström, G., . . . Sonestedt, E. (2019). Association between added sugar intake and mortality is nonlinear and dependent on sugar source in 2 Swedish population-based prospective cohorts. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 109(2), 411-423
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between added sugar intake and mortality is nonlinear and dependent on sugar source in 2 Swedish population-based prospective cohorts
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2019 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 109, no 2, p. 411-423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although sugar consumption has been associated with several risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases, evidence for harmful long-term effects is lacking. In addition, most studies have focused on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), not sugar per se.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the associations between added and free sugar intake, intake of different sugar sources, and mortality risk.

Methods: Two prospective population-based cohorts were examined: the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS; n = 24,272), which collected dietary data by combining a food diary, interview, and food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and the Northern Swedish Health and Disease Study (NSHDS; n = 24,475), which assessed diet with an FFQ. Sugar intakes defined as both added and free sugar and different sugar sources were examined. The associations with mortality were examined using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression.

Results: Higher sugar consumption was associated with a less favorable lifestyle in general. The lowest mortality risk was found with added sugar intakes between 7.5% and 10% of energy (E%) intake in both cohorts. Intakes >20E% were associated with a 30% increased mortality risk, but increased risks were also found at intakes <5E% [23% in the MDCS and 9% (nonsignificant) in the NSHDS]. Similar U-shaped associations were found for both cardiovascular and cancer mortality in the MDCS. By separately analyzing the different sugar sources, the intake of SSBs was positively associated with mortality, whereas the intake of treats was inversely associated.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a high sugar intake is associated with an increased mortality risk. However, the risk is also increased among low sugar consumers, although they have a more favorable lifestyle in general. In addition, the associations are dependent on the type of sugar source.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
added sugar, free sugar, sugar-sweetened beverages, mortality, cardiometabolic risk marker, nutritional epidemiology
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157790 (URN)10.1093/ajcn/nqy268 (DOI)000460615600020 ()30590448 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061509173 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Brunius, C., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 452.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbonic anhydrase VI (CA6) catalyses the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in saliva with possible pH regulation, taste perception, and tooth formation effects. This study assessed effects of variation in the CA6 gene on oral microbiota and specifically the acidophilic and caries-associated Streptococcus mutans in 17-year old Swedish adolescents (n = 154). Associations with caries status and secreted CA6 protein were also evaluated. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (27 SNPs in 5 haploblocks) and saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota from Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing and culturing were analysed. Haploblock 4 (rs10864376, rs3737665, rs12138897) CCC associated with low prevalence of S. mutans (OR (95% CI): 0.5 (0.3, 0.8)), and caries (OR 0.6 (0.3, 0.9)), whereas haploblock 4 TTG associated with high prevalence of S. mutans (OR: 2.7 (1.2, 5.9)) and caries (OR: 2.3 (1.2, 4.4)). The TTG-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(G)) was characterized by S. mutans, Scardovia wiggsiae, Treponema sp. HOT268, Tannerella sp. HOT286, Veillonella gp.1 compared with the CCC-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(C)). Secreted CA6 in saliva was weakly linked to CA6 gene variation. In conclusion, the results indicate that CA6 gene polymorphisms influence S. mutans colonization, tooth biofilm microbiota composition and risk of dental caries in Swedish adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155838 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-36832-z (DOI)000456553400018 ()30679524 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Huseinovic, E., Hörnell, A., Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Lindahl, B. & Winkvist, A. (2019). Changes in food intake patterns during 2000–2007 and 2008–2016 in the population-based Northern Sweden Diet Database. Nutrition Journal, 18, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in food intake patterns during 2000–2007 and 2008–2016 in the population-based Northern Sweden Diet Database
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2019 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 18, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Food intake patterns provide a summary of dietary intake. Few studies have examined trends in food intake patterns over time in large, population-based studies. We examined food intake patterns and related sociodemographic and individual characteristics in the large Northern Sweden Diet Database during the two time windows 2000–2007 and 2008–2016.

Methods: In total, 100 507 participants (51% women) who had filled in a 64-item food frequency questionnaire and provided background and sociodemographic data between 2000 and 2016 were included. Food intake patterns were evaluated for women and men separately for the two time windows 2000–2007 and 2008–2016, respectively. Latent class analysis was used to identify distinct, latent clusters based on 40 food groups.

Results: Among both women and men, a greater proportion of participants were classified into food intake patterns characterized by high-fat spread and high-fat dairy during 2008–2016 compared to 2000–2007. In the earlier time window, these high-fat clusters were related to lower educational level and smoking. Simultaneously, the proportion of women and men classified into a cluster characterized by high intake of fruit, vegetables, and fibre decreased from the earlier to the later time window.

Conclusion: From a public health perspective, the increase in clusters with a high conditional mean for high-fat spread and high-fat dairy and decrease in clusters with a high conditional mean for fruit and vegetables, during the time period 2008–2016 compared to 2000–2007, is worrisome as it indicates a shift away from the recommended food habits. Subgroups of women and men with less healthy dietary patterns in the time window 2008–2016 with lower education, lower age, higher body mass index, lower levels of physical activity and more smoking were identified and future interventions may be targeted towards these groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Food intake patterns, Dietary patterns, FFQ, NSDD, Diet, Time trends
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161908 (URN)10.1186/s12937-019-0464-0 (DOI)000475681700001 ()31299991 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068890784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Key, T. J., Appleby, P. N., Bradbury, K. E., Sweeting, M., Wood, A., Johansson, I., . . . Danesh, J. (2019). Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort. Circulation, 139(25), 2835-2845
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort
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2019 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 139, no 25, p. 2835-2845Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about the relevance of animal foods to the etiology of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined meat, fish, dairy products and eggs and risk for IHD in the pan-European EPIC cohort.

METHODS: A prospective study of 409,885 men and women in nine European countries. Diet was assessed using validated questionnaires, calibrated using 24-hour recalls. Lipids and blood pressure were measured in a subsample. During 12.6 years mean follow up, 7198 participants had a myocardial infarction or died from IHD. The relationships of animal foods with risk were examined using Cox regression with adjustment for other animal foods and relevant covariates.

RESULTS: The hazard ratio (HR) for IHD was 1.19 (95% CI 1.06-1.33) for a 100 g/d increment in intake of red and processed meat, and this remained significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up (HR 1.25 [1.09-1.42]). Risk was inversely associated with intakes of yogurt (HR 0.93 [0.89-0.98] per 100 g/d increment), cheese (HR 0.92 [0.86-0.98] per 30 g/d increment) and eggs (HR 0.93 [0.88-0.99] per 20 g/d increment); the associations with yogurt and eggs were attenuated and non-significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up. Risk was not significantly associated with intakes of poultry, fish or milk. In analyses modelling dietary substitutions, replacement of 100 kcal/d from red and processed meat with 100 kcal/d from fatty fish, yogurt, cheese or eggs was associated with approximately 20% lower risk of IHD. Consumption of red and processed meat was positively associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol concentration and systolic blood pressure, and consumption of cheese was inversely associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol.

CONCLUSIONS: Risk for IHD was positively associated with consumption of red and processed meat, and inversely associated with consumption of yogurt, cheese and eggs, although the associations with yogurt and eggs may be influenced by reverse causation bias. It is not clear whether the associations with red and processed meat and cheese reflect causality, but they were consistent with the associations of these foods with plasma non-HDL cholesterol, and for red and processed meat with systolic blood pressure, which could mediate such effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, eggs, fish, meat
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158691 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.038813 (DOI)000471794100017 ()31006335 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 205212/Z/16/ZSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Nilsson, L. M., Jansson, J.-H., Wennberg, P. & Winkvist, A. (2019). Dairy Product Intake and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Northern Sweden: A 33-Year Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients, 11(284)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy Product Intake and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Northern Sweden: A 33-Year Prospective Cohort Study
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dairy products are important constituents of most diets, and their association with adverse health outcomes remains a focus. We characterized dairy food intake and examined associations with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke among 108,065 Swedish men and women. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using the multivariable Cox proportional hazards models in a population characterized by high milk tolerance. During a mean follow-up of 14.2 years, 11,641 first-time events occurred. Non-fermented milk intake decreased, whereas butter intake increased over the period. For high intake of non-fermented milk, the HR (95% CI) for developing T2D and MI was 1.17 (1.03, 1.34) and 1.23 (1.10, 1.37), respectively, in men. A greater intake of butter, fermented milk, and cheese tended to be associated with a reduced risk of T2D and/or MI. Non-consumers and those who chose low-fat variants of the targeted dairy products had increased risk for T2D, MI, or stroke compared to those in the non-case group. Generally, effect-sizes were small. This prospective study found that non-fermented milk was associated with an increased risk for developing T2D and MI and that subjects abstaining from dairy products or choosing low-fat variants were at greater risk. However, the overall cardiometabolic risk of non-fermented milk intake was judged as low, since the effect sizes were small.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, milk, cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156027 (URN)10.3390/nu11020284 (DOI)000460829700075 ()30696081 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060813708 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L. M., Winkvist, A., Esberg, A., Jansson, J.-H., Wennberg, P., van Guelpen, B. & Johansson, I. (2019). Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population. Nutrition and Cancer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population
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2019 (English)In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The role of dairy products in cancer is unclear. We assessed consumption of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter, estimated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, in relation to prospective risk of breast, prostate, colorectal, smoking-, and obesity-related cancers in 101,235 subjects, including 12,552 cancer cases, in the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Most analyses (n = 20) rendered null results. In men, we observed an increased prostate cancer risk among high-consumers of cheese (hazard ratio (HR) for highest vs. lowest quintile (Q5-Q1), 1.11; 95% CI, 0.97-1.27; Ptrend = 0.013). In women, high-consumers of cheese had a decreased risk of overall cancer (HR Q5-Q1, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.04; Ptrend = 0.039), smoking-related (HR Q5-Q1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; Ptrend ≤ 0.001), and colorectal cancers (HR Q5-Q1, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.63-1.07; Ptrend = 0.048). Butter yielded a weak decreased obesity-related cancer risk in women (HR Q5-Q1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81-1.02; Ptrend = 0.049). Fermented milk yielded HRs below zero in women, but with no clear linear associations. In conclusion, this study does not support any major adverse or beneficial effects of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter in the diet from a cancer risk perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, milk, cheese, fermented milk, cancer
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161682 (URN)10.1080/01635581.2019.1637441 (DOI)000476072800001 ()31298944 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068900342 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-25 Last updated: 2019-08-12
Shi, L., Brunius, C., Bergdahl, I., Johansson, I., Rolandsson, O., Donat Vargas, C., . . . Landberg, R. (2019). Joint Analysis of Metabolite Markers of Fish Intake and Persistent Organic Pollutants in Relation to Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Swedish Adults. Journal of Nutrition, 149(8), 1413-1423
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Joint Analysis of Metabolite Markers of Fish Intake and Persistent Organic Pollutants in Relation to Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Swedish Adults
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 149, no 8, p. 1413-1423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is conflicting evidence regarding the association between fish intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D) incidence, possibly owing to measurement errors in self-reported intake and coexposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) present in fish.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify plasma metabolites associated with fish intake and to assess their association with T2D risk, independently of POPs, in Swedish adults.

METHODS: In a case-control study nested in the Swedish Västerbotten Intervention Programme, fasting plasma samples from 421 matched T2D case-control pairs of men and women aged 30-60 y at baseline and 10-y follow-up samples from a subset of 149 pairs were analyzed using untargeted metabolomics. Moreover, 16 plasma POPs were analyzed for the 149 pairs who had repeated samples available. Fish-related plasma metabolites were identified using multivariate modelling and partial correlation analysis. Reproducibility of metabolites and metabolite patterns, derived via principal component analysis (PCA), was assessed by intraclass correlation. A unique component of metabolites unrelated to POPs was dissected by integrating metabolites and POPs using 2-way orthogonal partial least squares regression. ORs of T2D were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

RESULTS: We identified 31 metabolites associated with fish intake that had poor to good reproducibility. A PCA-derived metabolite pattern strongly correlated with fish intake (ρ = 0.37, P < 0.001) but showed no association with T2D risk. Integrating fish-related metabolites and POPs led to a unique metabolite component independent of POPs, which tended to be inversely associated with T2D risk (OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.54, 1.02, P = 0.07). This component mainly consisted of metabolites reflecting fatty fish intake.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that fatty fish intake may be beneficial for T2D prevention, after removing the counteractive effects of coexposure to POPs in Swedish adults. Integrating metabolite markers and POP exposures appears a promising approach to advance the understanding of associations between fish intake and T2D incidence.

Keywords
O2PLS modeling, fish biomarkers, metabolomics, nested case-control study, persistent organic pollutants, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162531 (URN)10.1093/jn/nxz068 (DOI)31209490 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-23Bibliographically approved
Klingberg, S., Mehlig, K., Johansson, I., Lindahl, B., Winkvist, A. & Lissner, L. (2019). Occupational stress is associated with major long-term weight gain in a Swedish population-based cohort. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 92(4), 569-576
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational stress is associated with major long-term weight gain in a Swedish population-based cohort
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 569-576Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Occupational stress and obesity are both increasing in prevalence, but prospective findings relating these conditions are inconsistent. We investigated if baseline as well as prolonged exposure to high job demands and low decision latitude were associated with major weight gain (≥ 10% of baseline weight) in 3872 Swedish women and men examined three times over 20 years in the population-based Västerbotten Intervention Program.

Methods: Anthropometry was measured and participants completed questionnaires on job strain, diet, and other lifestyle factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for confounders.

Results: Adjusting for age, baseline low decision latitude was associated with major weight gain over 10- and 20-year OR (95% CI) 1.16 (1.00–1.33) and 1.29 (1.13–1.47), respectively (both sexes combined). After adjustment for diet quality and other confounders, the effect over 20 years remained 1.30 (1.13–1.50). Sex modified the effect of prolonged exposure to high job demands over at least 10 years (interaction p = 0.02), showing that high job demands was a risk factor of major weight gain over 20 years in women [1.54 (1.14–2.07)], but not in men [0.87 (0.63–1.19)]. Neither diet nor other lifestyle factors explained these associations.

Conclusions: In conclusion, low decision latitude predicted major weight gain in women and men. In women, the results suggest an additional contribution to major weight gain from high job demands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Job strain, Work stress, Job demand, Decision latitude, Weight gain, Weight change, Prospective study
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158065 (URN)10.1007/s00420-018-1392-6 (DOI)000462612100011 ()30523396 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006-1506Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilWallenberg FoundationsVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Projects
Gender differences in how stroke and myocardial infarction are related to fish consumption, methylmercury, fish fatty acids, and selenium [2007-2024_Formas]; Umeå UniversityThe Northern Sweden Diet Database [2010-05986_VR]; Umeå UniversityGene discovery in periodontitis and dental caries - the GLIDE consortium [2011-03372_VR]; Umeå UniversityUnderstanding dental caries through genetics and mircobiota characterization - the GLIDE consortium [2015-02597_VR]; Umeå UniversityMilk - friend or foe to health? [2016-00960_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9227-8434

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