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Meyer-Jacob, CarstenORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8208-496x
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Myrstener, E., Biester, H., Bigler, C., Lidberg, W., Meyer-Jacob, C., Rydberg, J. & Bindler, R. (2019). Environmental footprint of small-scale, historical mining and metallurgy in the Swedish boreal forest landscape: The Moshyttan blast furnace as microcosm. The Holocene, 29(4), 578-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental footprint of small-scale, historical mining and metallurgy in the Swedish boreal forest landscape: The Moshyttan blast furnace as microcosm
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2019 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 578-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The history of mining and smelting and the associated pollution have been documented using lake sediments for decades, but the broader ecological implications are not well studied. We analyzed sediment profiles covering the past similar to 10,000 years from three lakes associated with an iron blast furnace in central Sweden, as an example of the many small-scale furnaces with historical roots in the medieval period. With a focus on long-term lake-water quality, we analyzed multiple proxies including geochemistry, pollen and charcoal, diatom composition and inferred pH, biogenic silica (bSi), visible near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIRS)-inferred lake-water total organic carbon (LW-TOC), and VNIRS-inferred sediment chlorophyll (sed-Chl). All three lakes had stable conditions during the middle Holocene (similar to 5000 BCE to 1110 CE) typical of oligo-dystrophic lakes: pH 5.4-5.6, LW-TOC 15-18 mg L-1. The most important diatom taxa include, for example, Aulacoseira scalaris, Brachysira neoexilis, and Frustulia saxonica. From similar to 1150 CE, decreases in LW-TOC, bSi, and sed-Chl in all three lakes coincide with a suite of proxies indicating disturbance associated with local, small-scale agriculture, and the more widespread use of the landscape in the past (e.g. forest grazing, charcoal production). Most important was a decline in LW-TOC by 30-50% in the three lakes prior to the 20th century. In addition, the one lake (Fickeln) downstream of the smelter and main areas of cultivation experienced a shift in diatom composition (mainly increasing Asterionella formosa) and a 0.6 pH increase coinciding with increasing cereal pollen and signs of blast furnace activity. The pH did not change in the other two lakes in response to disturbance; however, these lakes show a slight increase (0.3-0.5 pH units) because of modern liming. LW-TOC has returned to background levels in the downstream lake and remains lower in the other two.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
diatoms, environmental change, geochemistry, human impacts, lake-water carbon, sediment, total organic carbon
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158734 (URN)10.1177/0959683618824741 (DOI)000463639500004 ()
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Weber, M. E., Lantzsch, H., Dekens, P., Das, S. K., Reilly, B. T., Martos, Y. M., . . . Wolfgramm, P. (2018). 200,000 years of monsoonal history recorded on the lower Bengal Fan: strong response to insolation forcing. Global and Planetary Change, 166, 107-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>200,000 years of monsoonal history recorded on the lower Bengal Fan: strong response to insolation forcing
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2018 (English)In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 166, p. 107-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a multidisciplinary study to provide the stratigraphic and palaeoclimatic context of monsoonal rainfall dynamics and their responses to orbital forcing for the Bay of Bengal. Using sediment lightness we established an age model at orbital resolution for International Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) Core U1452C-1H that covers the last 200 ka in the lower Bengal Fan. The low-resolution delta O-18 of G. sacculifer is consistent with global delta O-18 records, at least for major glacial-to-interglacial transitions. The variability of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and the delta C-13 composition of organic matter indicate the marine origin of organic matter. Marine primary productivity likely increased during insolation minima, indicative for an enhanced NE monsoon during glacials and stadials. Pristine insolation forcing is also documented for wet-bulk density, red green color variability, and grain-size variations, indicating that darker and coarser-grained material deposited at higher sedimentation rates during insolation minima. Stronger NE monsoon likely amplified ocean-atmosphere interactions over the Indian Ocean, leading to stronger upwelling through shoaling the thermocline, and higher delivery of sediment to the Bay of Bengal due to higher soil erosion on land. In addition, lower glacial and stadial sea levels as well as stronger westward surface circulation favored delivery of coarser-grained fluvial material to the lower Bengal Fan. At the same time the stronger NE monsoon might have increased the aeolian supply. Total inorganic carbon, the Ca/Ti ratio, and biogenic silica vary dominantly on obliquity frequencies, suggesting mobilization and transport of lithogenic material primarily during lowered sea levels and/or higher influence of the Northern Hemisphere westerlies on the dust transport from the Tibetan Plateau. The close resemblance of sediment lightness and the climate record of Antarctic ice cores over multiple glacial cycles indicate close relationship between high southern latitude and tropical Asian climate through shifts in position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The Bengal Fan monsoonal record shows very clear and strict responses to insolation forcing in the lower part from -200 ka to the Younger Toba Tuff during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7 - 5, and less distinct response patterns after deposition of the ash during MIS 4- 2, consistent with low-amplitude changes in insolation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150757 (URN)10.1016/j.gloplacha.2018.04.003 (DOI)000435624000009 ()
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Meyer-Jacob, C., Michelutti, N., Paterson, A. M., Monteith, D., Yang, H., Weckström, J., . . . Bindler, R. (2017). Inferring past trends in lake water organic carbon concentrations in northern lakes using sediment spectroscopy. Environmental Science and Technology, 51(22), 13248-13255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inferring past trends in lake water organic carbon concentrations in northern lakes using sediment spectroscopy
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 51, no 22, p. 13248-13255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Changing lake water total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations are of concern for lake management because of corresponding effects on aquatic ecosystem functioning, drinking water resources and carbon cycling between land and sea. Understanding the importance of human activities on TOC changes requires knowledge of past concentrations; however, water-monitoring data are typically only available for the past few decades, if at all. Here, we present a universal model to infer past lake water TOC concentrations in northern lakes across Europe and North America that uses visible-near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy on lake sediments. In the orthogonal partial least-squares model, VNIR spectra of surface-sediment samples are calibrated against corresponding surface water TOC concentrations (0.5-41 mg L-1) from 345 Arctic to northern temperate lakes in Canada, Greenland, Sweden and Finland. Internal model-cross-validation resulted in a R-2 of 0.57 and a prediction error of 4.4 mg TOC L-1. First applications to lakes in southern Ontario and Scotland, which are outside of the model's geographic range, show the model accurately captures monitoring trends, and suggests that TOC dynamics during the 20th century at these sites were primarily driven by changes in atmospheric deposition. Our results demonstrate that the lake water TOC model has multiregional applications and is not biased by postdepositional diagenesis, allowing the identification of past TOC variations in northern lakes of Europe and North America over time scales of decades to millennia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2017
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143014 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.7b03147 (DOI)000416496700021 ()29064242 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ninnes, S., Tolu, J., Meyer-Jacob, C., Mighall, T. M. & Bindler, R. (2017). Investigating molecular changes in organic matter composition in two Holocene lake-sediment records from central Sweden using pyrolysis-GC/MS. Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, 122(6), 1423-1438
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating molecular changes in organic matter composition in two Holocene lake-sediment records from central Sweden using pyrolysis-GC/MS
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, ISSN 2169-8953, E-ISSN 2169-8961, Vol. 122, no 6, p. 1423-1438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organic matter (OM) is a key component of lake sediments, affecting carbon, nutrient, and trace metal cycling at local and global scales. Yet little is known about long-term (millennial) changes in OM composition due to the inherent chemical complexity arising from multiple OM sources and from secondary transformations. In this study we explore how the molecular composition of OM changes throughout the Holocene in two adjacent boreal lakes in central Sweden and compare molecular-level information with conventional OM variables, including total carbon, total nitrogen, C:N ratios, delta C-13, and delta N-15. To characterize the molecular OM composition, we employed a new method based on pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), which yields semiquantitative data on > 100 organic compounds of different origin and degradation status. We identify large changes in OM composition after deglaciation (circa 8500 +/- 500 B.C.), associated with early landscape development, and during the most recent 4050 years, driven by degradation processes. With molecular(-)level information we can also distinguish between natural landscape development and human catchment disturbance during the last 1700 years. Our study demonstrates that characterization of the molecular OM composition by the high-throughput PyGC/MS method is an efficient complement to conventional OM variables for identification and understanding of past OM dynamics in lake-sediment records. Holocene changes observed for pyrolytic compounds and compound classes known for having different reactivity indicate the need for further paleo-reconstruction of the molecular OM composition to better understand both past and future OM dynamics and associated environmental changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2017
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138425 (URN)10.1002/2016JG003715 (DOI)000406520900008 ()
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Meyer-Jacob, C., Bindler, R., Bigler, C., Leng, M. J., Lowick, S. E. & Vogel, H. (2017). Regional Holocene climate and landscape changes recorded in the large subarctic lake Torneträsk, N Fennoscandia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 487, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional Holocene climate and landscape changes recorded in the large subarctic lake Torneträsk, N Fennoscandia
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2017 (English)In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 487, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the response of sensitive Arctic and subarctic landscapes to climate change is essential to determine the risks of ongoing and projected climate warming. However, these responses will not be uniform in terms of timing and magnitude across the landscape because of site-specific differences in ecosystem susceptibility to climate forcing. Here we present a multi-proxy analysis of a sediment record from the 330-km2 lake Torneträsk to assess the sensitivity of the Fennoscandian subarctic landscape to climate change over the past ~ 9500 years. By comparing responses of this large-lake system to past climatic and environmental changes with those in small lakes in its catchment, we assessed when the magnitude of change was sufficient to affect an entire region rather than only specific sub-catchments that may be more sensitive to localized environmental changes such as, e.g., tree-line dynamics. Our results show three periods of regional landscape alteration with distinct change in sediment composition: i) landscape development following deglaciation and through the Holocene Thermal Maximum, ~ 9500–3400 cal yr BP; ii) increased soil erosion during the Little Ice Age (LIA); and iii) rapid change during the past century coincident with ongoing climate change. The gradual landscape development led to successive changes in the lake sediment composition over several millennia, whereas climate cooling during the late Holocene caused a rather abrupt shift occurring within ~ 100 years. However, this shift at the onset of the LIA (~ 750 cal yr BP) occurred > 2000 years later than the first indications for climate cooling recorded in small lakes in the Torneträsk catchment, suggesting that a critical ecosystem threshold was not crossed until the LIA. In contrast, the ongoing response to recent climate change was immediate, emphasizing the unprecedented scale of ongoing climate changes in subarctic Fennoscandia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Inorganic geochemistry, Soil erosion, Climate change, Oxygen and silicon isotopes, Holocene, Scandinavia
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111628 (URN)10.1016/j.palaeo.2017.08.001 (DOI)000414881100001 ()
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form 2015 with the title "Holocene ecosystem ontogeny and element cycling in the subarctic catchment of lake Torneträsk, NW Sweden : large lake sensitivity to climate change" by authors Carsten Meyer-Jacob, Richard Bindler, Christian Bigler, Melanie J. Leng and Hendrik Vogel.

Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Tolu, J., Rydberg, J., Meyer-Jacob, C., Gerber, L. & Bindler, R. (2017). Spatial variability of organic matter molecular composition and elemental geochemistry in surface sediments of a small boreal Swedish lake. Biogeosciences, 14(7), 1773-1792
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial variability of organic matter molecular composition and elemental geochemistry in surface sediments of a small boreal Swedish lake
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2017 (English)In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 1773-1792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The composition of sediment organic matter (OM) exerts a strong control on biogeochemical processes in lakes, such as those involved in the fate of carbon, nutrients and trace metals. While between-lake spatial variability of OM quality is increasingly investigated, we explored in this study how the molecular composition of sediment OM varies spatially within a single lake and related this variability to physical parameters and elemental geochemistry. Surface sediment samples (0-10 cm) from 42 locations in Harsvatten - a small boreal forest lake with a complex basin morphometry - were analyzed for OM molecular composition using pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry for the contents of 23 major and trace elements and biogenic silica. We identified 162 organic compounds belonging to different biochemical classes of OM (e.g., carbohydrates, lignin and lipids). Close relationships were found between the spatial patterns of sediment OM molecular composition and elemental geochemistry. Differences in the source types of OM (i.e., terrestrial, aquatic plant and algal) were linked to the individual basin morphometries and chemical status of the lake. The variability in OM molecular composition was further driven by the degradation status of these different source pools, which appeared to be related to sedimentary physicochemical parameters (e.g., redox conditions) and to the molecular structure of the organic compounds. Given the high spatial variation in OM molecular composition within Harsvatten and its close relationship with elemental geochemistry, the potential for large spatial variability across lakes should be considered when studying biogeochemical processes in-volved in the cycling of carbon, nutrients and trace elements or when assessing lake budgets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH, 2017
National Category
Geochemistry Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134206 (URN)10.5194/bg-14-1773-2017 (DOI)000398194900001 ()
Available from: 2017-06-21 Created: 2017-06-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wacnik, A., Tylmann, W., Bonk, A., Goslar, T., Enters, D., Meyer-Jacob, C. & Grosjean, M. (2016). Determining the responses of vegetation to natural processes and human impacts in north-eastern Poland during the last millennium: combined pollen, geochemical and historical data. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 25(5), 479-498
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determining the responses of vegetation to natural processes and human impacts in north-eastern Poland during the last millennium: combined pollen, geochemical and historical data
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2016 (English)In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 479-498Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pollen, charcoal and geochemical investigations were carried out on annually laminated sediments of Lake Zabinskie (54 degrees 07'54.5 '' N; 21 degrees 59'01.1 '' E) and the results were combined with historical and climate data to better understand the mechanism behind plant cover transformations. A millennium-long record of environmental history at 6-years time resolution permitted an assessment of vegetation responses to past human impact and climate fluctuations. Our results show that the history of the region with repeated periods of warfare, epidemics, famine and crop failures is well reflected by environmental proxies. Before the Teutonic Order crusade (AD 1230-1283), agricultural activities of the Prussian tribes were conducted at a distance from the studied lake and caused slight disturbances of local forests. A stronger human impact was registered after ca AD 1460. We confirm that co-domination of pine forests with spruce and oakhornbeam forests on drier habitats as well as the presence of birch and alder woods on wet surfaces near the lake lasted until AD 1610. We identified a transition period of 20 years between AD 1590 and 1610, when forest cover was significantly reduced and the area was partly transformed into open land used for farming activities. The comparison of our data with other pollen datasets from the region confirms significant spatio-temporal differences in the initiation of large-scale woodland clearings in the Great Masurian Lake District. A strong increase in local cultivation was noted after AD 1750 and became even stronger in the period AD 1810-1940. The last 60 years experienced a succession from arable fields and open grasslands to more tree-covered habitats overgrown by birch and alder.

Keywords
Human impact on woodland, Palynology, Erosion, Varved sediments, High time-resolution, Prussia
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127742 (URN)10.1007/s00334-016-0565-z (DOI)000386396200006 ()
Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-11-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hahn, A., Compton, J. S., Meyer-Jacob, C., Kirsten, K. L., Lucasssen, F., Perez Mayo, M., . . . Zabel, M. (2016). Holocene paleo-climatic record from the South African Namaqualand mudbelt: A source to sink approach. Quaternary International, 404(B), 121-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holocene paleo-climatic record from the South African Namaqualand mudbelt: A source to sink approach
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2016 (English)In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 404, no B, p. 121-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variations in the sediment input to the Namaqualand mudbelt during the Holocene are assessed using an integrative terrestrial to marine, source to sink approach. Geochemical and Sr and Nd isotopic signatures are used to distinguish fluvial sediment source areas. Relative to the sediments of the Olifants River, craton outcrops in the northern Orange River catchment have a more radiogenic Sr and a more unradiogenic Nd isotopic signature. Furthermore, upper Orange River sediments are rich in heavier elements such as Ti and Fe derived from the chemical weathering of Drakensberg flood basalt. Suspension load signatures change along the Orange River's westward transit as northern catchments contribute physical weathering products from the Fish and Molopo River catchment area. Marine cores offshore of the Olifants (GeoB8323-2) and Orange (GeoB8331-4) River mouths show pulses of increased contribution of Olifants River and upper Orange River input, respectively. These pulses coincide with intervals of increased terrestrial organic matter flux and increased paleo-production at the respective core sites. We attribute this to an increase in fluvial activity and vegetation cover in the adjacent catchments during more humid climate conditions. The contrast in the timing of these wet phases in the catchment areas reflects the bipolar behavior of the South African summer and winter rainfall zones. While rainfall in the Orange River catchment is related to southward shifts in the ICTZ, rainfall in the Olifants catchment is linked to northward shifts in Southern Hemisphere Westerly storm tracks. The later may also have increased southern Benguela upwelling in the past by reducing the shedding of Agulhas eddies into the Atlantic. The high-resolution records of latitudinal shifts in these atmospheric circulation systems correspond to late Holocene centennial-millennial scale climate variability evident in Antarctic ice core records. The mudbelt cores indicate that phases of high summer rainfall zone and low winter rainfall zone humidity (at ca. 2.8 and 1 ka BP) may be synchronous with Antarctic warming events. On the other hand, dry conditions in the summer rainfall zone along with wet conditions in the winter rainfall zone (at ca 3.3, 2 and 0.5 ka BP) may be associated with Antarctic cooling events.

Keywords
Provenance studies, Oranje River, Marine sediments, Westerlies, Sr-Nd isotopes, FTIR-spectroscopy
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122544 (URN)10.1016/j.quaint.2015.10.017 (DOI)000376403500011 ()
Available from: 2016-07-26 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wennrich, V., Andreev, A. A., Tarasov, P. E., Fedorov, G., Zhao, W., Gebhardt, C. A., . . . Melles, M. (2016). Impact processes, permafrost dynamics, and climate and environmental variability in the terrestrial Arctic as inferred from the unique 3.6 Myr record of Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russia - A review. Paper presented at 2nd International Conference of the Palaeo-Arctic-Spatial-and-Temporal-Gateways-Network (PAST Gateways), May 19-23 2014, Trieste, ITALY. Quaternary Science Reviews, 147, 221-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact processes, permafrost dynamics, and climate and environmental variability in the terrestrial Arctic as inferred from the unique 3.6 Myr record of Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russia - A review
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2016 (English)In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 147, p. 221-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lake El'gygytgyn in Far East Russia is a 3.6 Myr old impact crater lake. Located in an area that has never been affected by Cenozoic glaciations nor desiccation, the unique sediment record of the lake represents the longest continuous sediment archive of the terrestrial Arctic. The surrounding crater is the only impact structure on Earth developed in mostly acid volcanic rocks. Recent studies on the impactite, permafrost, and sediment sequences recovered within the framework of the ICDP "El'gygytgyn Drilling Project" and multiple pre-site surveys yielded new insight into the bedrock origin and cratering processes as well as permafrost dynamics and the climate and environmental history of the terrestrial Arctic back to the mid-Pliocene. Results from the impact rock section recovered during the deep drilling clearly confirm the impact genesis of the El'gygytgyn crater, but indicate an only very reduced fallback impactite sequence without larger coherent melt bodies. Isotope and element data of impact melt samples indicate a F-type asteroid of mixed composition or an ordinary chondrite as the likely impactor. The impact event caused a long-lasting hydrothermal activity in the crater that is assumed to have persisted for c. 300 kyr. Geochemical and microbial analyses of the permafrost core indicate a subaquatic formation of the lower part during lake-level highstand, but a subaerial genesis of the upper part after a lake-level drop after the Allerod. The isotope signal and ion compositions of ground ice is overprinted by several thaw freeze cycles due to variations in the talik underneath the lake. Modeling results suggest a modern permafrost thickness in the crater of c. 340 m, and further confirm a pervasive character of the talik below Lake El'gygytgyn. The lake sediment sequences shed new leight into the Pliocene and Pleistocene climate and environmental evolution of the Arctic. During the mid-Pliocene, significantly warmer and wetter climatic conditions in western Beringia than today enabled dense boreal forests to grow around Lake Ergygytgyn and, in combination with a higher nutrient flux into the lake, promoted primary production. The exceptional warmth during the mid-Pliocene is in accordance with other marine and terrestrial records from the Arctic and indicates a period of enhanced "Arctic amplification". The favourable conditions during the mid-Pliocene were repeatedly interrupted by climate deteriorations, e.g., during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2, when pollen data and sediment proxies indicate a major cooling and the onset of local permafrost around the lake. A gradual vegetation change after c. 3.0 Ma points to the onset of a long-term cooling trend during the Late Pliocene that culminated in major temperature drops, first during MIS G6, and later during MIS 104. These cold events coincide with the onset of an intensified Northern Hemisphere (NH) glaciation and the largest extent of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, respectively. After the Pliocene/Pleistocene transition, local vegetation and primary production in Lake El'gygtygyn experienced a major change from relatively uniform conditions to a high-amplitude glacial-to-interglacial cyclicity that fluctuated on a dominant 41 kyr obliquity band, but changed to a 100 kyr eccentricity dominance during the Middle Pleistocene transition (MPT) at c. 1.2-0.6 Ma. Periods of exceptional warming in the Pleistocene record of Lake El'gygytgyn with dense boreal forests around and peaks of primary production in the lake are assigned to so-called "super-interglacial" periods. The occurrence of these super-interglacials well corresponds to collapses of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) recorded in ice-free periods in the ANDRILL core, which suggests strong intrahemispheric teleconnections presumably driven by changes in the thermocline ocean circulation.

Keywords
Lake El'gygytgyn, ICDP, Mid -Pliocene warmth, Arctic amplification, Pliocene/Pleistocene transition, per-intergiacials, Permafrost dynamics, Impact history
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126300 (URN)10.1016/j.quascirev.2016.03.019 (DOI)000382409500015 ()
Conference
2nd International Conference of the Palaeo-Arctic-Spatial-and-Temporal-Gateways-Network (PAST Gateways), May 19-23 2014, Trieste, ITALY
Available from: 2016-11-04 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Vogel, H., Meyer-Jacob, C., Thöle, L., Lippold, J. A. & Jaccard, S. L. (2016). Quantification of biogenic silica by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) in marine sediments. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, 14(12), 828-838
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of biogenic silica by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) in marine sediments
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2016 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, ISSN 1541-5856, E-ISSN 1541-5856, Vol. 14, no 12, p. 828-838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to the major role played by diatoms in the marine biological pump, opal/biogenic silica (bSi) has a strong potential as a proxy for paleoproduction reconstructions. Here, we present a detailed evaluation of the independent Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) calibration introduced by Meyer-Jacob et al. (2014a), which is based on synthetic sediment mixtures with known concentrations of bSi and the application of partial least squares (PLS) regression, for the determination of bSi in marine sediments. To test the robustness of the FTIRS calibration for marine samples we selected 199 globally distributed samples, with available wet chemically inferred bSi concentrations and compared the results of both methods. We observe that the spectral characteristics in marine samples are comparable to those reported for a synthetic FTIR spectrum composed solely of spectral features in quartz, biogenic silica, and calcite. FTIRS-inferred and wet-chemically measured bSi concentrations for the set of 199 marine sediment samples are strongly correlated (R-2 = 0.87; RMSE = 5.27%). Together with the high reproducibility of bSi values by the independent calibration our results corroborate the applicability of the independent FTIRS bSi calibration for quantification in marine samples. This together with the succinct sample preparation procedure, rapid analysis, reduced consumable and machine maintenance costs makes FTIRS a powerful and robust alternative for the quantitative analysis of bSi in marine sediments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132165 (URN)10.1002/lom3.10129 (DOI)000393047700005 ()
Available from: 2017-03-07 Created: 2017-03-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
Quantifying long-term mechanisms behind the ongoing increase in lake-water carbon in northern lakes: a look back to predict future levels [2016-00573_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8208-496x

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