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Rydberg, Johan
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Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Myrstener, E., Biester, H., Bigler, C., Lidberg, W., Meyer-Jacob, C., Rydberg, J. & Bindler, R. (2019). Environmental footprint of small-scale, historical mining and metallurgy in the Swedish boreal forest landscape: The Moshyttan blast furnace as microcosm. The Holocene, 29(4), 578-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental footprint of small-scale, historical mining and metallurgy in the Swedish boreal forest landscape: The Moshyttan blast furnace as microcosm
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2019 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 578-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The history of mining and smelting and the associated pollution have been documented using lake sediments for decades, but the broader ecological implications are not well studied. We analyzed sediment profiles covering the past similar to 10,000 years from three lakes associated with an iron blast furnace in central Sweden, as an example of the many small-scale furnaces with historical roots in the medieval period. With a focus on long-term lake-water quality, we analyzed multiple proxies including geochemistry, pollen and charcoal, diatom composition and inferred pH, biogenic silica (bSi), visible near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIRS)-inferred lake-water total organic carbon (LW-TOC), and VNIRS-inferred sediment chlorophyll (sed-Chl). All three lakes had stable conditions during the middle Holocene (similar to 5000 BCE to 1110 CE) typical of oligo-dystrophic lakes: pH 5.4-5.6, LW-TOC 15-18 mg L-1. The most important diatom taxa include, for example, Aulacoseira scalaris, Brachysira neoexilis, and Frustulia saxonica. From similar to 1150 CE, decreases in LW-TOC, bSi, and sed-Chl in all three lakes coincide with a suite of proxies indicating disturbance associated with local, small-scale agriculture, and the more widespread use of the landscape in the past (e.g. forest grazing, charcoal production). Most important was a decline in LW-TOC by 30-50% in the three lakes prior to the 20th century. In addition, the one lake (Fickeln) downstream of the smelter and main areas of cultivation experienced a shift in diatom composition (mainly increasing Asterionella formosa) and a 0.6 pH increase coinciding with increasing cereal pollen and signs of blast furnace activity. The pH did not change in the other two lakes in response to disturbance; however, these lakes show a slight increase (0.3-0.5 pH units) because of modern liming. LW-TOC has returned to background levels in the downstream lake and remains lower in the other two.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
diatoms, environmental change, geochemistry, human impacts, lake-water carbon, sediment, total organic carbon
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158734 (URN)10.1177/0959683618824741 (DOI)000463639500004 ()
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Capo, E., Rydberg, J., Tolu, J., Domaizon, I., Debroas, D., Bindler, R. & Bigler, C. (2019). How Does Environmental Inter-annual Variability Shape Aquatic Microbial Communities?: A 40-Year Annual Record of Sedimentary DNA From a Boreal Lake (Nylandssjon, Sweden). Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7, Article ID 245.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Does Environmental Inter-annual Variability Shape Aquatic Microbial Communities?: A 40-Year Annual Record of Sedimentary DNA From a Boreal Lake (Nylandssjon, Sweden)
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 7, article id 245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To assess the sensitivity of lakes to anthropogenically-driven environmental changes (e.g., nutrient supply, climate change), it is necessary to first isolate the effects of between-year variability in weather conditions. This variability can strongly impact a lake's biological community especially in boreal and arctic areas where snow phenology play an important role in controlling the input of terrestrial matter to the lake. Identifying the importance of this inherent variability is difficult without time series that span at least several decades. Here, we applied a molecular approach (metabarcoding on eukaryotic 18S rRNA genes and qPCR on cyanobacterial 16S rRNA genes) to sedimentary DNA (sed-DNA) to unravel the annual variability of microbial community in 40 years' sediment record from the boreal lake Nylandssjon which preserve annually-laminated sediments. Our comparison between seasonal meteorological data, sediment inorganic geochemistry (X-ray fluorescence analyses) and organic biomarkers (pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses), demonstrated that inter-annual variability strongly influence the sediment composition in Nylandssjon. Spring temperature, snow and ice phenology (e.g., the percentage of snow loss in spring, the timing of lake ice-off) were identified as important drivers for the inputs of terrestrial material to the lake, and were therefore also important for shaping the aquatic biological community. Main changes were detected in the late-80s/mid-90s and mid-2000s associated with increases in algal productivity, in total richness of the protistan community and in relative abundances of Chlorophyta, Dinophyceae as well as Cyanobacteria abundance. These changes could be linked to a decline in terrestrial inputs to the lake during the snow melt and run-off period, which in turn was driven by warmer winter temperatures. Even if our data shows that meteorological factors do affect the sediment composition and microbial communities, they only explain part of the variability. This is most likely a consequence of the high inter-annual variability in abiotic and biotic parameters highlighting the difficulty to draw firm conclusions concerning drivers of biological changes at an annual or sub-annual resolution even with the 40-year varved sediment record from Nylandssjon. Hence, it is necessary to have an even longer time perspective in order to reveal the full implications of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
varved sediment record, sedimentary DNA, protists, metabarcoding, meteorological data, inorganic geochemistry, organic proxies, paleolimnology
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161823 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2019.00245 (DOI)000474916200001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Olajos, F., Bokma, F., Bartels, P., Myrstener, E., Rydberg, J., Öhlund, G., . . . Englund, G. (2018). Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 9(3), 535-543
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment
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2018 (English)In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2041-210X, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 535-543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]
  1. Detection of DNA in lake sediments holds promise as a tool to study processes like extinction, colonization, adaptation and evolutionary divergence. However, low concentrations make sediment DNA difficult to detect, leading to high false negative rates. Additionally, contamination could potentially lead to high false positive rates. Careful laboratory procedures can reduce false positive and negative rates, but should not be assumed to completely eliminate them. Therefore, methods are needed that identify potential false positive and negative results, and use this information to judge the plausibility of different interpretations of DNA data from natural archives.
  2. We developed a Bayesian algorithm to infer the colonization history of a species using records of DNA from lake-sediment cores, explicitly labelling some observations as false positive or false negative. We illustrate the method by analysing DNA of whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.) from sediment cores covering the past 10,000 years from two central Swedish lakes. We provide the algorithm as an R-script, and the data from this study as example input files.
  3. In one lake, Stora Lögdasjön, where connectivity with the proto-Baltic Sea and the degree of whitefish ecotype differentiation suggested colonization immediately after deglaciation, DNA was indeed successfully recovered and amplified throughout the post-glacial sediment. For this lake, we found no loss of detection probability over time, but a high false negative rate. In the other lake, Hotagen, where connectivity and ecotype differentiation suggested colonization long after deglaciation, DNA was amplified only in the upper part of the sediment, and colonization was estimated at 2,200 bp based on the assumption that successful amplicons represent whitefish presence. Here the earliest amplification represents a false positive with a posterior probability of 41%, which increases the uncertainty in the estimated time of colonization.
  4. Complementing careful laboratory procedures aimed at preventing contamination, our method estimates contamination rates from the data. By combining these results with estimates of false negative rates, our models facilitate unbiased interpretation of data from natural DNA archives.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
British Ecological Society, 2018
Keywords
ancient DNA, colonization, Coregonus lavaretus, detection probability, divergence, environmental DNA, lake sediment, population age
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143248 (URN)10.1111/2041-210X.12890 (DOI)000426867600010 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5110
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Norström, E., Bringensparr, C., Fitchett, J. M., Grab, S. W., Rydberg, J. & Kylander, M. (2018). Late-Holocene climate and vegetation dynamics in eastern Lesotho highlands. The Holocene, 28(9), 1483-1494
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Late-Holocene climate and vegetation dynamics in eastern Lesotho highlands
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2018 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 1483-1494Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The eastern Lesotho highlands are of considerable hydrological importance to southern Africa as a so-called water tower' for the surrounding region. Here, we contribute proxy-data inferring climate and vegetation changes over the past 1600 years, assessing in parallel inorganic and organic chemical analyses on a sediment core from Ladybird wetland, eastern Lesotho. Several proxies were used to determine changes in local vegetation dynamics, productivity, hydrology ((13) C, (15) N, C/N, TOC) and the input and source of the detrital components (Ca/Ti, CIA). The first part of the multi-proxy record (AD 400-800) shows stable terrestrial conditions and low detrital input, followed by higher variability in almost all proxies between ca. AD 900 and 1200. The (13) C record infers a higher proportion of C-4 vegetation, tentatively associated with higher temperatures during this phase, coeval with the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA). After AD 1200, local conditions change gradually from purely terrestrial, towards the typical wetland environment prevailing today. A higher proportion of C-3 plants and possibly an increase in aquatic organisms within the organic matrix corresponds with decreasing detrital input, suggesting locally high available moisture in this part of Lesotho during the Little Ice Age (LIA). Although age-model constraints impedes a robust regional comparison, the inferred climate variability is discussed as a tentative response to enhanced mid-latitude cyclonic activity during LIA, and the variable MCA climate conditions as indirectly dictated by changes in solar activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
carbon isotope composition, geochemistry, Lesotho, palaeoclimate, palaeohydrology, palaeovegetation, Southern Africa, XRF
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151769 (URN)10.1177/0959683618777054 (DOI)000443315700009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 48-2013-6241
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Kylander, M. E., Martínez-Cortizas, A., Bindler, R., Kaal, J., Sjöström, J. K., Hansson, S. V., . . . Rauch, S. (2018). Mineral dust as a driver of carbon accumulation in northern latitudes. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 6876.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mineral dust as a driver of carbon accumulation in northern latitudes
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6876Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Peatlands in northern latitudes sequester one third of the world's soil organic carbon. Mineral dusts can affect the primary productivity of terrestrial systems through nutrient transport but this process has not yet been documented in these peat-rich regions. Here we analysed organic and inorganic fractions of an 8900-year-old sequence from Store Mosse (the "Great Bog") in southern Sweden. Between 5420 and 4550 cal yr BP, we observe a seven-fold increase in net peat-accumulation rates corresponding to a maximum carbon-burial rate of 150 g C m-2 yr-1 - more than six times the global average. This high peat accumulation event occurs in parallel with a distinct change in the character of the dust deposited on the bog, which moves from being dominated by clay minerals to less weathered, phosphate and feldspar minerals. We hypothesize that this shift boosted nutrient input to the bog and stimulated ecosystem productivity. This study shows that diffuse sources and dust dynamics in northern temperate latitudes, often overlooked by the dust community in favour of arid and semi-arid regions, can be important drivers of peatland carbon accumulation and by extension, global climate, warranting further consideration in predictions of future climate variability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147806 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-25162-9 (DOI)000431203100005 ()29720603 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Kylander, M. E., Plikk, A., Rydberg, J., Lowemark, L., Salonen, J. S., Fernandez-Fernandez, M. & Helmens, K. (2018). New insights from XRF core scanning data into boreal lake ontogeny during the Eemian (Marine Isotope Stage 5e) at Sokli, northeast Finland. Quaternary Research, 89(1), 352-364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New insights from XRF core scanning data into boreal lake ontogeny during the Eemian (Marine Isotope Stage 5e) at Sokli, northeast Finland
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2018 (English)In: Quaternary Research, ISSN 0033-5894, E-ISSN 1096-0287, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 352-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biological proxies from the Sokli Eemian (Marine Isotope Stage 5e) paleolake sequence from northeast Finland have previously shown that, unlike many postglacial records from boreal sites, the lake becomes increasingly eutrophic over time. Here, principal components (PC) were extracted from a high resolution multi-element XRF core scanning dataset to describe minerogenic input from the wider catchment (PC1), the input of S, Fe, Mn, and Ca-rich detrital material from the surrounding Sokli Carbonatite Massif (PC2), and chemical weathering (PC3). Minerogenic inputs to the lake were elevated early in the record and during two abrupt cooling events when soils and vegetation in the catchment were poor. Chemical weathering in the catchment generally increased over time, coinciding with higher air temperatures, catchment productivity, and the presence of acidic conifer species. Abiotic edaphic processes play a key role in lake ontogeny at this site stemming from the base cation- and nutrient-rich bedrock, which supports lake alkalinity and productivity. The climate history at this site, and its integrated effects on the lake system, appear to override development processes and alters its long-term trajectory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2018
Keywords
Eemian, XRF core scanning, Geochemistry, Lake sediment, Boreal, Ontogeny
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145797 (URN)10.1017/qua.2017.84 (DOI)000425965700023 ()
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bindler, R., Karlsson, J., Rydberg, J., Karlsson, B., Berg Nilsson, L., Biester, H. & Segerström, U. (2017). Copper-ore mining in Sweden since the pre-Roman Iron Age: lake-sediment evidence of human activities at the Garpenberg ore field since 375 BCE. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 12, 99-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Copper-ore mining in Sweden since the pre-Roman Iron Age: lake-sediment evidence of human activities at the Garpenberg ore field since 375 BCE
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 12, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historical documents, archaeological evidence and lake-sediment records indicate thus far that significant mining of iron and copper ores in the Berglsagen mining region in central Sweden did not begin until the late 12th century -first with iron in Norberg - and thereafter spreading rapidly throughout the region during the 13th century when also copper was included (e.g. Falun). Prior to this, iron was produced domestically from secondary sources such as bog iron, while geochemical analyses of bronze artefacts indicate copper was imported. The parish of Garpenberg was at the intersection between historical iron-and copper-mining districts, and consequently we expected our sediment record from the lake Gruvsjon ('mine lake') to follow the established 13th century development. However, a 2-3-fold enrichment in copper and lead occurred already during 375-175 BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age), together with small increases in zinc, magnesium and charcoal particles, and changes in pollen. Together these indicate a clear pattern of human disturbance connected with the ore body bordering the lake. A second distinct phase occurred 115-275 CE, but with an 8-9-fold increase in copper and lead along with other indicators. From 400 CE a permanent increase in copper and lead occurred, which then accelerated from the 13th century as seen elsewhere in the region. Our results push back the evidence for early ore mining in Sweden from the Middle Ages to the pre-Roman Iron Age. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143578 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2017.01.019 (DOI)000415616300012 ()
Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Tolu, J., Rydberg, J., Meyer-Jacob, C., Gerber, L. & Bindler, R. (2017). Spatial variability of organic matter molecular composition and elemental geochemistry in surface sediments of a small boreal Swedish lake. Biogeosciences, 14(7), 1773-1792
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial variability of organic matter molecular composition and elemental geochemistry in surface sediments of a small boreal Swedish lake
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2017 (English)In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 1773-1792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The composition of sediment organic matter (OM) exerts a strong control on biogeochemical processes in lakes, such as those involved in the fate of carbon, nutrients and trace metals. While between-lake spatial variability of OM quality is increasingly investigated, we explored in this study how the molecular composition of sediment OM varies spatially within a single lake and related this variability to physical parameters and elemental geochemistry. Surface sediment samples (0-10 cm) from 42 locations in Harsvatten - a small boreal forest lake with a complex basin morphometry - were analyzed for OM molecular composition using pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry for the contents of 23 major and trace elements and biogenic silica. We identified 162 organic compounds belonging to different biochemical classes of OM (e.g., carbohydrates, lignin and lipids). Close relationships were found between the spatial patterns of sediment OM molecular composition and elemental geochemistry. Differences in the source types of OM (i.e., terrestrial, aquatic plant and algal) were linked to the individual basin morphometries and chemical status of the lake. The variability in OM molecular composition was further driven by the degradation status of these different source pools, which appeared to be related to sedimentary physicochemical parameters (e.g., redox conditions) and to the molecular structure of the organic compounds. Given the high spatial variation in OM molecular composition within Harsvatten and its close relationship with elemental geochemistry, the potential for large spatial variability across lakes should be considered when studying biogeochemical processes in-volved in the cycling of carbon, nutrients and trace elements or when assessing lake budgets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH, 2017
National Category
Geochemistry Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134206 (URN)10.5194/bg-14-1773-2017 (DOI)000398194900001 ()
Available from: 2017-06-21 Created: 2017-06-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lindborg, T., Rydberg, J., Trojbom, M., Berglund, S., Johansson, E., Lofgren, A., . . . Laudon, H. (2016). Biogeochemical data from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in a periglacial catchment, West Greenland. Earth System Science Data, 8(2), 439-459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biogeochemical data from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in a periglacial catchment, West Greenland
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2016 (English)In: Earth System Science Data, ISSN 1866-3508, E-ISSN 1866-3516, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 439-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global warming is expected to be most pronounced in the Arctic where permafrost thaw and release of old carbon may provide an important feedback mechanism to the climate system. To better understand and predict climate effects and feedbacks on the cycling of elements within and between ecosystems in northern latitude landscapes, a thorough understanding of the processes related to transport and cycling of elements is required. A fundamental requirement to reach a better process understanding is to have access to high-quality empirical data on chemical concentrations and biotic properties for a wide range of ecosystem domains and functional units (abiotic and biotic pools). The aim of this study is therefore to make one of the most extensive field data sets from a periglacial catchment readily available that can be used both to describe present-day periglacial processes and to improve predictions of the future. Here we present the sampling and analytical methods, field and laboratory equipment and the resulting biogeochemical data from a state-of-the-art whole-ecosystem investigation of the terrestrial and aquatic parts of a lake catchment in the Kangerlussuaq region, West Greenland. This data set allows for the calculation of whole-ecosystem mass balance budgets for a long list of elements, including carbon, nutrients and major and trace metals. The data set is freely available and can be downloaded from PANGAEA: doi: 10.1594/PANGAEA.860961.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127964 (URN)10.5194/essd-8-439-2016 (DOI)000384596100002 ()
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Moreno-Brush, M., Rydberg, J., Gamboa, N., Storch, I. & Biester, H. (2016). Is mercury from small-scale gold mining prevalent in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon?. Environmental Pollution, 218, 150-159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is mercury from small-scale gold mining prevalent in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon?
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2016 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 218, p. 150-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is an ongoing debate on the fate of mercury (Hg) in areas affected by artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM). Over the last 30 years, ASGM has released 69 tons of Hg into the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. To investigate the role of suspended matter and hydrological factors on the fate of ASGM-Hg, we analysed riverbank sediments and suspended matter along the partially ASGM-affected Malinowski-Tambopata river system and examined Hg accumulation in fish. In addition, local impacts of atmospheric Hg emissions on aquatic systems were assessed by analysing a sediment core from an oxbow lake. Hg concentrations in riverbank sediments are lower (20-53 ng g(-1)) than in suspended matter (similar to 400-4000 ng g(-1)) due to differences in particle size. Elevated Hg concentrations in suspended matter from ASGM-affected river sections (similar to 1400 vs. similar to 30-120 ng L-1 in unaffected sections) are mainly driven by the increased amount of suspended matter rather than increased Hg concentrations in the suspended matter. The oxbow lake sediment record shows low Hg concentrations (64-86 ng g(-1)) without evidence of any ASGM-related increase in atmospheric Hg input. Hg flux variations are mostly an effect of variations in sediment accumulation rates. Moreover, only 5% of the analysed fish (only piscivores) exceed WHO recommendations for human consumption (500 ng g(-1)). Our findings show that ASGM-affected river sections in the Malinowsld-Tambopata system do not exhibit increased Hg accumulation, indicating that the released Hg is either retained at the spill site or transported to areas farther away from the ASGM areas. We suspect that the fate of ASGM-Hg in such tropical rivers is mainly linked to transport associated with the suspended matter, especially during high water situations. We assume that our findings are typical for ASGM-affected areas in tropical regions and could explain why aquatic systems in such ASGM regions often show comparatively modest enrichment in Hg levels. 

Keywords
Amazon, Gold mining, ASGM, Mercury transport, Lake sediments, Fish
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127586 (URN)10.1016/j.envpol.2016.08.038 (DOI)000385596000018 ()27552048 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-07 Created: 2016-11-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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