umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux increases the risk of daytime sleepiness in women
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 53, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Daytime sleepiness is common in women and has negative health effects. Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) and snoring are risk factors for daytime sleepiness, but the effect of their interaction remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine how nGER and snoring combined affected daytime sleepiness and involuntary falling asleep in women.

METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to randomly selected women in 2000 and 2010. Participants who answered questions regarding both nGER and snoring in both questionnaires were included (N = 4882). Daytime sleepiness was defined as severe or very severe problems with daytime sleepiness. Involuntary falling asleep was defined as sometimes, often or very often falling asleep involuntarily during the day. Respondents snoring loudly and disturbingly sometimes, often or very often were defined as snorers. Having nocturnal heartburn or acid reflux sometimes, often or very often was defined as having nGER.

RESULTS: Daytime sleepiness was reported by 14% of the participants, involuntary falling asleep by 11%. After adjustment for age, smoking, physical activity, caffeine intake and alcohol dependency, increased odd ratios (ORs) for both daytime sleepiness (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-9.2) and involuntary falling asleep (adjusted OR 3.1, 95% CI: 1.5-6.4) were seen in women with the combination of nGER and snoring at both baseline and follow-up. The association with daytime sleepiness was also strong for those with only persistent nGER but not for those with only persistent snoring.

CONCLUSION: Women with nGER were at increased risk of developing daytime sleepiness and snoring augmented this association. In addition, women with both nGER and snoring were also at increased risk of developing involuntary falling asleep.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 53, p. 94-100
Keywords [en]
Daytime sleepiness, Involuntary falling asleep, Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux, Snoring
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155669DOI: 10.1016/j.sleep.2018.08.036ISI: 000457169500016PubMedID: 30504084Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85057393514OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-155669DiVA, id: diva2:1282559
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationAvailable from: 2019-01-25 Created: 2019-01-25 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Franklin, Karl A.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Franklin, Karl A.
By organisation
Surgery
In the same journal
Sleep Medicine
Surgery

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 54 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf