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Sustained reductions of invasive infectious disease following general infant Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccination in a Swedish Arctic region
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9885-2321
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 10, p. 1871-1878Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM

Vaccine‐preventable pathogens causing severe childhood infections include Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. In this study conducted in a Swedish Arctic region, we evaluated the effects of general infant Hib and pneumococcal vaccination on invasive infectious diseases among children and assessed the need of meningococcal vaccination.

METHODS

We identified cases of bacterial meningitis and sepsis from diagnosis and laboratory registers in the Västerbotten Region, Sweden, during 1986–2015. We then reviewed medical records to confirm the diagnosis and extract data for assessing incidence changes, using an exploratory data analysis and a time‐series analysis.

RESULTS

Invasive Haemophilus disease declined by 89.1% (p < 0.01), Haemophilus meningitis by 95.3% (p < 0.01) and all‐cause bacterial meningitis by 82.3% (p < 0.01) in children aged 0 to four years following general infant Hib vaccination. Following pneumococcal vaccination, invasive pneumococcal disease declined by 84.7% (p < 0.01), pneumococcal meningitis by 67.5% (p = 0.16) and all‐cause bacterial meningitis by 48.0% (p = 0.23). Incidence of invasive meningococcal disease remained low during the study period.

CONCLUSION

Remarkable sustained long‐term declines of invasive infectious diseases in younger children occurred following infant Hib and pneumococcal vaccinations in this Swedish Arctic region. Despite not offering general infant meningococcal vaccination, incidence of invasive meningococcal disease remained low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 108, no 10, p. 1871-1878
Keywords [en]
Bacterial meningitis, Sepsis, Vaccination, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Medicine; Pediatrics; Infectious Diseases
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158845DOI: 10.1111/apa.14824OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158845DiVA, id: diva2:1315098
Funder
Västerbotten County CouncilAvailable from: 2019-05-10 Created: 2019-05-10 Last updated: 2019-10-03

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Johansson Kostenniemi, UrbanSellin, MatsSilfverdal, Sven-Arne

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