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Passive personal air sampling of dust in a working environment: A pilot study
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1227-6859
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2440-9543
Swedish Defence Research Agency, CBRN Defence & Security Division, Umeå, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, ISSN 1545-9624, E-ISSN 1545-9632, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 675-684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to make a preliminary evaluation of the University of North Carolina passive aerosol sampler (UNC sampler) for personal air sampling of particles. Nine personal air samplings of respirable fraction were conducted in an open-pit mine, with pairwise UNC samplers and a respirable cyclone mounted on the chest of workers. UNC samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to some extent energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Respirable cyclone filter samples were weighed. Correlations and particle elemental compositions were described. Microscopic imaging of the collection surface showed that the particles were heterogeneously deposited across the surface of the UNC sampler. Collected particles were shaped as gravel particles and the resulting particle size distribution in air showed a peak at ca. 3 µm aerodynamic diameter, similarly to what has previously been reported from the same mine. The elemental composition indicated mineral origin. All correlations between the airborne mass concentrations from UNC samplers and respirable cyclones (Pearson = 0.54 and Spearman = 0.43) and between pairs of parallel UNC samplers (Pearson = 0.55 and Spearman = 0.67) were weak. The UNC sampler mass concentrations were approximately 30 times higher than those measured with the respirable cyclone. In conclusion, the UNC sampler, when used for personal sampling in a mine, provides a reasonable particle size distribution and the deposited particles appeared to be of mineral origin and not from textile or skin but the approximately 30-fold overestimation of mass concentrations when comparing with respirable cyclone sampling indicates that further improvements are necessary. Positioning of the sampler may be critical and moving the UNC sampler from the chest to e.g. the top of a helmet might be an improvement. Grounding of the sampler in order to avoid static electricity might also be useful. The UNC sampler should continue to be researched for personal sampling, as passive sampling might become a useful alternative to more laborious sampling techniques.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019. Vol. 16, no 10, p. 675-684
Keywords [en]
Area factor, UNC passive aerosol sampler, mesh factor, mineral, occupational exposure, respirable cyclone
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162647DOI: 10.1080/15459624.2019.1648814ISI: 000490322700001PubMedID: 31442106OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-162647DiVA, id: diva2:1345588
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0478Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved

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Shirdel, MariamBergdahl A., IngvarAndersson, Britt M.Sommar, Johan N.Liljelind, Ingrid E.

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Shirdel, MariamBergdahl A., IngvarAndersson, Britt M.Sommar, Johan N.Liljelind, Ingrid E.
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Section of Sustainable HealthDepartment of Applied Physics and Electronics
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Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyOccupational Health and Environmental Health

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