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Mortality in persons with disability pension due to common mental disorders: A cohort study of Swedish construction workers
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study investigated mortality in disability pensions due to common mental disorder, and variation over time after first receiving disability pension. Methods: Objectives were explored in 301,863 construction workers (97.2% men) recruited through healthcare examinations from 1971-1993. By linking with the Swedish National Insurance Agency registers, disability pensions until 2014 were identified. Common mental disorder was defined as disability pension diagnosis due to anxiety, stress-related disorders or moderate depression. Mortality was calculated in all-psychiatric diagnosis and diagnostic sub-groups, and compared to persons without disability pensions, using Poisson regression. Additional analyses were stratified by age at follow-up. Results: In total 6030 subjects received disability pensions based on psychiatric diagnoses, and 2624 constituted common mental disorder. Analyses in an all-psychiatric diagnosis displayed increased mortality risks in men (relative risk 3.6; 95% confidence interval 3.3-3.9) and women (relative risk 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.6-2.6). Common mental disorder was associated with mortality, especially in men (relative risk 2.5; 95% confidence interval 2.2-2.8). Increased relative risks in alcohol and substance abuse were also observed. Results in analyses stratified by age at follow-up displayed persistent high relative risks for mortality in older ages (75-89 years) in men in all-psychiatric disability pensions diagnosis (relative risk 2.8; 95% confidence interval 2.1-3.7) and common mental disorder diagnosis (relative risk 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.8-3.6), compared to men without disability pensions. Similar results were found in women, but few cases lowered the precision of estimates. Conclusions: This study shows that disability pension based on common mental disorders, often regarded as a 'lighter' psychiatric diagnosis, is a risk for early mortality in construction workers, even several years after first receiving disability pension.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Disability pension, common mental disorders, construction workers, mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166527DOI: 10.1177/1403494819884440PubMedID: 31820671OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-166527DiVA, id: diva2:1379483
Note

2019-12-20: Epub ahead of print. Granskad. /CSa

Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2019-12-20

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Stattin, MikaelJärvholm, Bengt

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Stattin, MikaelJärvholm, Bengt
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Department of SociologySection of Sustainable Health
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Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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