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Severe traumatic brain injury: consequences of early adverse events
Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Klinisk neurovetenskap.
Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Klinisk neurovetenskap.
Vise andre og tillknytning
2011 (engelsk)Inngår i: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 55, nr 8, s. 944-951Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several factors associated with an unfavourable outcome after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been described: prolonged pre-hospital time, secondary referral to a level 1 trauma centre, the occurrence of secondary insults such as hypoxia, hypotension or low end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2)). To determine whether adverse events were linked to outcome, patients with severe TBI were studied before arrival at a level 1 trauma centre.

Methods: Prospective, observational study design. Patients with severe TBI (n = 48), admitted to Umea University Hospital between January 2002 to December 2005 were included. All medical records from the site of the accident to arrival at the level 1 trauma centre were collected and evaluated.

Results: A pre-hospital time of >60 min, secondary referral to a level 1 trauma centre, documented hypoxia (oxygen saturation <95%), hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg), hyperventilation (ETCO(2) <4.5 kPa) or tachycardia (heart rate >100 beats/min) at any time before arrival at a level 1 trauma centre were not significantly related to an unfavourable outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale 1-3).

Conclusion: Early adverse events before arrival at a level 1 trauma centre were without significance for outcome after severe TBI in the trauma system studied.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. Vol. 55, nr 8, s. 944-951
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-47379DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-6576.2011.02451.xISI: 000294356500006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-47379DiVA, id: diva2:443697
Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-09-26 Laget: 2011-09-20 Sist oppdatert: 2019-11-28bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Trauma - logistics and stress response
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Trauma - logistics and stress response
2014 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Background: Trauma is a major cause of death and disability. Adverse events, such as prolonged prehospital time, hypoxia, hypotension and/or hyperventilation have been reported to correlate to poor outcome.

Adequate cortisol levels are essential for survival after major trauma. In hypotensive critically ill patients, lack of sufficient amount of cortisol can be suspected, and a concept of critical illness related corticosteroid insufficiency has been proposed. Corticosteroid therapy has many adverse effects in critically ill patients and should only be given if life-saving. Correct measurement of serum cortisol levels is important but difficult in critically ill patients with capillary leakage. Estimation of the free and biologically active cortisol is preferable. In serum less than 10% of cortisol is free and biologically active and not possible to measure with routine laboratory methods. Salivary cortisol can be used as a surrogate for free cortisol, but salivary production is reduced in critically ill patients. Liver resection could reduce cortisol levels due to substrate deficiency.

Aims: 1. Evaluate the occurrence of early adverse events in patients with traumatic brain injury and relate them to outcome. 2. Assess cortisol levels over time after trauma and correlate to severity of trauma, sedative/analgesic drugs and cardiovascular function. 3. Evaluate if saliva stimulation could be performed without interfering with salivary cortisol levels. 4. Assess cortisol levels over time after liver resection in comparison to other major surgery.

Results: There was no significant correlation between prehospital time ³60 minutes, hypoxia (saturation <95%), hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg), or hyperventilation (ETCO2 <4.5 kPa) and a poor outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale 1-3) in patients with traumatic brain injury. Cortisol levels decreased significantly over time after trauma, but there was no correlation between low (<200 nmol/L) serum cortisol levels and severity of trauma.

Infusion of sedative/analgesic drugs was the strongest predictor for a low (<200 nmol/L) serum cortisol. The odds ratio for low serum cortisol levels (<200 nmol/L) was 8.0 for patients receiving continuous infusion of sedative/analgesic drugs. There was no significant difference between unstimulated and stimulated salivary cortisol levels (p=0.06) in healthy volunteers. Liver resection was not associated with significantly lower cortisol levels compared to other major surgery.

Conclusion: There was no significant correlation between early adverse events and outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury. Cortisol levels decreased significantly over time in trauma patients. Low cortisol levels (<200 nmol/L) were significantly correlated to continuous infusion of sedative/analgesic drugs. Saliva stimulation could be performed without interfering with salivary cortisol levels. Liver resection was not associated with low cortisol levels compared to other major surgery.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Umeå Universitet, 2014. s. 65
Serie
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1654
Emneord
traumatic brain injury, multiple trauma, hydrocortisone, adrenal insufficiency, hypnotics and sedatives, citric acid, glycerol, saliva, liver, colorectal surgery
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93324 (URN)978-91-7601-072-3 (ISBN)
Disputas
2014-10-10, E04 byggnad 6E NUS, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 09:00 (svensk)
Opponent
Veileder
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-09-19 Laget: 2014-09-17 Sist oppdatert: 2018-06-07bibliografisk kontrollert

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Brorsson, CamillaRodling-Wahlström, MarieOlivecrona, MagnusKoskinen, Lars-OweNaredi, Silvana

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