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Proteomic analysis of cartilage- and bone-associated samples.
Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Kuopio, Finland. (Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation Group)ORCID-id: 0000-0002-6181-9904
Department of Medical Chemistry, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
Department of Medical Chemistry, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
2006 (engelsk)Inngår i: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 27, nr 13, s. 2687-2701, artikkel-id 16739228Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Fritextbeskrivning
Abstract [en]

The skeleton of the human body is built of cartilage and bone, which are tissues that contain extensive amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM). In bone, inorganic mineral hydroxyapatite forms 50-70% of the whole weight of the tissue. Although the organic matrix of bone consists of numerous proteins, 90% of it is composed of type I collagen. In cartilage, ECM forms a major fraction of the tissue, type II collagen and aggrecans being the most abundant macromolecules. It is obvious that the high content of ECM components causes analytical problems in the proteomic analysis of cartilage and bone, analogous to those in the analysis of low-abundance proteins present in serum. The massive contents of carbohydrates present in cartilage proteoglycans, and hydroxyapatite in bone, further complicate the situation. However, the development of proteomic tools makes them more and more tempting also for research of musculoskeletal tissues. Application of proteomic techniques to the research of chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts in cell cultures can immediately benefit from the present knowledge. Here we make an overview to previous proteomic research of cartilage- and bone-associated samples and evaluate the future prospects of applying proteomic techniques to investigate key events, such as cellular signal transduction, in cartilage- and bone-derived cells.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
John Wiley & Sons, 2006. Vol. 27, nr 13, s. 2687-2701, artikkel-id 16739228
Emneord [en]
Cartilage, bone, proteomics, mass spectrometry
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
biokemi; cellforskning
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106650DOI: 10.1002/elps.200600004PubMedID: 16739228OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-106650DiVA, id: diva2:843208
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-07-27 Laget: 2015-07-27 Sist oppdatert: 2018-06-07

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