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Saliva and tooth biofilm bacterial microbiota in adolescents in a low caries community
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. (Cariology; Pedodontics)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 5861Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oral cavity harbours a complex microbiome that is linked to dental diseases and serves as a route to other parts of the body. Here, the aims were to characterize the oral microbiota by deep sequencing in a low-caries population with regular dental care since childhood and search for association with caries prevalence and incidence. Saliva and tooth biofilm from 17-year-olds and mock bacteria communities were analysed using 16S rDNA Illumina MiSeq (v3-v4) and PacBio SMRT (v1-v8) sequencing including validity and reliability estimates. Caries was scored at 17 and 19 years of age. Both sequencing platforms revealed that Firmicutes dominated in the saliva, whereas Firmicutes and Actinobacteria abundances were similar in tooth biofilm. Saliva microbiota discriminated caries-affected from caries-free adolescents, with enumeration of Scardovia wiggsiae, Streptococcus mutans, Bifidobacterium longum, Leptotrichia sp. HOT498, and Selenomonas spp. in caries-affected participants. Adolescents with B. longum in saliva had significantly higher 2-year caries increment. PacBio SMRT revealed Corynebacterium matruchotii as the most prevalent species in tooth biofilm. In conclusion, both sequencing methods were reliable and valid for oral samples, and saliva microbiota was associated with cross-sectional caries prevalence, especially S. wiggsiae, S. mutans, and B. longum; the latter also with the 2-year caries incidence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 7, article id 5861
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Dentistry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138030DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-06221-zISI: 000405895000013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-138030DiVA, id: diva2:1133585
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson, LindaHolgerson, Pernilla LifJohansson, Ingegerd

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