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To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning?: Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. The Graduate School in Population Dynamics and Public Policy, Umeå university.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2019 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Population aging motivated a focus in contemporary research on factors, e.g. cognitive functioning, that contribute to ‘aging well.’ However, something that has been overlooked is relation between memory functioning, determined by objective tests as well as subjective memory ratings, and subjective well-being (SWB).

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal (cross-lagged) relationships between episodic memory (both subjective and objective) and SWB.

Method: A total of 586 older individuals (60–90 years) were assessed on multiple measures of the targeted constructs at baseline (Time 1) as part of the Betula cohort study. Five years later (Time 2), 354 of the participants returned for follow-up measurements and were included in cross-lagged panel analyses.

Results: As expected, objective memory and subjective memory showed a pattern of cross-sectional age deficits and a mean level longitudinal decline was observed for objective memory. By contrast, SWB showed stable mean levels both across age and time. No cross-sectional or cross-lagged associations were observed between SWB and objective memory, whereas subjective memory and SWB showed a cross-sectional association.

Conclusion: The results underscore that successful aging is a multifaceted construct with no or only weak associations between the investigated components. However, SWB and rate of change at the individual level should be considered to define successful aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019. Vol. 23, no 1, p. 92-99
Keywords [en]
Successful aging, episodic memory, cross-sectional, longitudinal
National Category
Applied Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142047DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2017.1394439ISI: 000461682000013PubMedID: 29086589OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-142047DiVA, id: diva2:1158037
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-17 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved

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Nyström, MarkusEriksson Sörman, DanielRönnlund, Michael

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