umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The impacts of maternal iron deficiency and being overweight during pregnancy on neurodevelopment of the offspring
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. EURISTIKOS Excellence Centre for Paediatric Research, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 118, no 7, p. 533-540Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both maternal Fe deficiency (ID) and being overweight or obese (Ow/Ob, BMI >= 25 kg/m(2)) may negatively affect offspring brain development. However, the two risk factors correlate and their independent effects on infant neurodevelopment are unclear. PREOBE is a prospective observational study that included 331 pregnant Spanish women, of whom 166 had pre-gestational Ow/Ob. Fe status was analysed at 34 weeks and at delivery, and babies were assessed using Bayley III scales of neurodevelopment at 18 months. In confounder-adjusted analyses, maternal ID at 34 weeks was associated with lower composite motor scores at 18 months (mean 113.3 (SD 9.9) v. 117.1 (SD 9.2), P=0.039). Further, the offspring of mothers with ID at delivery had lower cognitive scores (114.0 (SD 9.7) v. 121.5 (SD 10.9), P = 0.039) and lower receptive, expressive and composite (99.5 (SD 8.6) v. 107.6 (SD 8.3), P= 0.004) language scores. The negative associations between maternal ID at delivery and Bayley scores remained even when adjusting for maternal Ow/Ob and gestational diabetes. Similarly, maternal Ow/Ob correlated with lower gross motor scores in the offspring (12.3 (SD 2.0) v. 13.0 (SD 2.1), P = 0.037), a correlation that remained when adjusting for maternal ID. In conclusion, maternal ID and pre-gestational Ow/Ob are both negatively associated with Bayley scores at 18 months, but independently and on different subscales. These results should be taken into account when considering Fe supplementation for pregnant women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017. Vol. 118, no 7, p. 533-540
Keywords [en]
iron, overweight, obesity, infant neurodevelopment, Bayley test
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141481DOI: 10.1017/S0007114517002410ISI: 000413169700006PubMedID: 28965494OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-141481DiVA, id: diva2:1158482
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Berglund, Staffan K.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Berglund, Staffan K.
By organisation
Paediatrics
In the same journal
British Journal of Nutrition
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive MedicineNutrition and Dietetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 182 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf