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Large lakes dominate CO2 evasion from lakes in an arctic catchment
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7853-2531
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6381-4509
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3785-8305
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Division of Water Resources Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
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2017 (English)In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 24, p. 12254-12261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

CO2 evasion from freshwater lakes is an important component of the carbon cycle. However, the relative contribution from different lake sizes may vary, since several parameters underlying CO2 flux are size dependent. Here we estimated the annual lake CO2 evasion from a catchment in northern Sweden encompassing about 30,000 differently sized lakes. We show that areal CO2 fluxes decreased rapidly with lake size, but this was counteracted by the greater overall coverage of larger lakes. As a result, total efflux increased with lake size and the single largest lake in the catchment dominated the CO2 evasion (53% of all CO2 evaded). By contrast, the contribution from the smallest ponds (about 27,000) was minor (<6%). Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for both CO2 flux rates and areal contribution of various sized lakes in assessments of CO2 evasion at the landscape scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2017. Vol. 44, no 24, p. 12254-12261
National Category
Geophysics Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144858DOI: 10.1002/2017GL076146ISI: 000422954700049OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-144858DiVA, id: diva2:1184939
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Biophysical controls on CO2 evasion from Arctic inland waters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biophysical controls on CO2 evasion from Arctic inland waters
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

CO2 evasion to the atmosphere from inland waters is a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Yet spatial patterns of CO2 evasion and the sources of C that fuel evasion remain poorly understood. In this thesis, I use detailed measurements of biological and physical drivers of CO2 evasion to assess how C is transformed and evaded from inland waters in the Arctic (Northern Scandinavia and Alaska). I found that lake size was a master variable controlling lake CO2 evasion in an Arctic catchment and that large lakes play a major role at the landscape scale. In stream networks, I found that catchment topography shapes patterns of CO2 evasion by dictating unique domains with high lateral inputs of C, other domains where biological processes were dominant, and domains where physical forces promoted degassing to the atmosphere. Together, these topographically driven domains created a strong spatial heterogeneity that biases regional and global estimates of CO2 evasion. Further, I found that photosynthetic activity in Arctic streams can produce a large change in CO2 concentrations from night to day, and as a result CO2 evasion is up to 45% higher during night than day. The magnitude of the diel change in CO2 was also affected by the turbulence of the stream and photo-chemical production of CO2. Overall, this thesis offers important insights to better understand landscape patterns of CO2 evasion from inland waters, and suggests that stream metabolic processes largely determine the fate of the C delivered from Arctic soils.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå Univeristy, 2019. p. 32
Keywords
Inland waters, carbon dioxide, organic carbon, inorganic carbon, arctic, CO2 evasion, DOC, DIC, streams, metabolism, oxygen
National Category
Physical Geography Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Limnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158882 (URN)978-91-7855-075-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-06-14, Carl Kempe Salen, KBC, Umeå University, Umeå, 09:30 (English)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved

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Rocher-Ros, GerardGiesler, ReinerLundin, ErikJonsson, AndersKarlsson, Jan

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