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Diversity, preventive work and education: matters of health and well-being in firefighter discourse
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0079-3816
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6544-3211
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 1817661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study is to analyse how recurrent health hindrance themes in the firefighter discourse, identified by firefighters themselves, relate to a set of policies about diversity, preventive work and education of firefighters. The intention is further to discuss the implications of these policy initiatives and the resistance against them in terms of firefighters’ health and well-being at work.

Method: Firefighters from three different rescue stations in Sweden, participated in either a focus group discussion or individual interviews. Different themes in firefighter discourse that were described as hindrances to the health and well-being of firefighters were identified. A strategic sample of policy documents that relate to the very same themes was also chosen for analysis and here we combined critical discourse analysis (CDA) with critical policy analysis.

Results: The health hindrance themes regarding diversity, preventive work and education that firefighters identified have in common that they relate to changes in work culture and the firefighter profession.

Conclusion: In conclusion, we argue that the most important challenge for the rescue service to tackle in the future, is how to transform firefighting to be more inclusive and yet maintaining the good health and well-being that exists among the vast majority of today’s firefighters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2020. Vol. 15, no 1, article id 1817661
Keywords [en]
Health, well-being, critical discourse analysis, firefighters, critical policy analysis, diversity, preventive work, education
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Nursing
Research subject
caring sciences in social sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147679DOI: 10.1080/17482631.2020.1817661ISI: 000569410000001PubMedID: 32935645Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85091054034OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-147679DiVA, id: diva2:1205432
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Exploring firefighters' health and wellbeing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring firefighters' health and wellbeing
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: This thesis supports the assumption that firefighters’ health and mental well-being is important, in order to cope with the stress that the profession implies. As health is an essential part of everyday life, it seems substantially to understand how an almost exclusively male workforce of firefighters construct their discourse in relation to health and well-being. The overall purpose of this thesis is to explore health and ill-health among firefighters in relation to their work environment, including coping strategies, critical incidents and ‘ordinary’ day-to-day work at the fire and rescue service station.

Methods: In Study I, 180 firefighters (16 women, 164 men) answered an open-ended question. Qualitative content analysis was used based on free text answers and focused on critical incidents. Study II, was based on a cross-sectional survey measuring burnout, psychosocial work environment and coping strategies. Participants were randomly selected and the final sample consisted of 476 firefighters (58 women, 418 men) and analyzed with multiple linear regression. In Study III and Study IV, a total of 28 fire-fighters (4 women and 24 men) participated in the study. Regarding Study IV a strategic sample of policy documents was also included. For Study III and IV, the research questions was dealt with applying critical discourse analysis on the focus group discussions (FGD) and individual interviews. In Study IV the analysed material also included policy documents.

Results: Findings from Study I were presented in four categories; ‘overwhelming critical situations’, ‘risks of delay, ‘risk of failure’ and ‘risks to oneself’. Women in Study I described their experiences in a more distanced account, while men described their experiences more vividly. Results from Study II showed overall low mean values in the burnout scales of emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP) among both women and men. Only 2 % of women and 1% of men scored high levels of EE, and only 2% of women and 3% of men scored high level of DP. A multiple linear regression showed that high demand and lack of social support contributed significantly to predicting EE among men. The coping strategies among firefighters influence the level of EE and DP, and these strategies were different between women and men. In Study III six dominant themes were identified. A strong sense of the firefighter community was articulated as health promoting. The physical exercise at work and the balance between emergency and station work were also two recurrent theme supporting firefighters’ health. Another health-promoting theme concerns clarity of roles among firefighters. Peer support and tolerance in the work group was another common theme, alongside with expressions of the firefighter as hero or helper. Themes described as hindrances to health and well-being in firefighters’ discourse were; diversity, preventive work and education. All hindrance themes were articulated as important struggles in the firefighter discourse against changes in work. In Study IV, we have identified two sides in the struggles, on the one hand we have the ‘insiders’, a majority of male firefighters working in the fire and rescue services representing a collective defending its autonomy and traditions. On the other hand we have the ‘outsiders’, represented by the government, the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, (MSB), municipalities, politicians at different levels and academic researchers.

Conclusion: Firefighters described critical incidents at work as overwhelming situations, along with negative experiences of organizational and practical tasks. Despite these experiences firefighters were reported as healthy according to EE and DP (Study I and II). Results of Study II also showed a relationship between psychosocial work environment and burnout among men, but not among women. The coping strategies among firefighters influence the level of burnout, and these strategies differ between women and men. The well-being in firefighters’ discourse, at least partly, is gained from a strong sense of belonging to a homosocial group characterized by closeness to each other and peers who take care of each other. The firefighters in our studies articulate this community-sense, and describe the importance of the similarity, rather than diversity (Studies III and IV). Findings from our studies regarding health and well-being, add knowledge to the current explanations relating to firefighters’ resistance to change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2018. p. 64
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1963
Keywords
Firefighters, health, well-being, burnout, psychosocial work environment, coping strategies, critical incidents, experiences, discourse analysis, focus groups, focus group discussion
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Nursing
Research subject
caring sciences in social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147637 (URN)978-91-7601-882-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-06-07, Vårdvetarhusets aula, Umeå Universitet, Umeå, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-10 Last updated: 2018-09-20Bibliographically approved

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Jacobsson, AnnBackteman-Erlandson, SusanneEgan Sjölander, Annika

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