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Anatomy of early modern patriarchy
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
2018 (English)In: Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-1800 / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren and Virginia Langum, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 10-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Thanks to the emergence and dynamism of new research fields over the past forty years, women and gender historians have been able to (re)define essential concepts and tools of analysis in order to examine women's past. Some of these findings and observations, however, came mostly from the examination of recent historical events and experiences, and are often wrongly used and applied to other historical periods. Patriarchy is one of them. In early modern Western historiography, patriarchy is usually described as a social organization marked by the supremacy of the father/husband in the family, the legal dependence of wives and children, and the reckoning of descent and inheritance in the male line. But as patriarchy has been theorized in the light of capitalism's outcomes, this chapter argues that it should not be used as a significant parameter for premodern studies. This chapter proposes, therefore, to revisit the paradigm of patriarchy applied to early modern Europe, with special reference to France. Because it has long been assumed that patriarchy was propped up by a male monopolization of the 'public' sphere of market relations, demonstration of prominent female activity in the latter prompt a re-thinking of the reach of patriarchy in real lives. Looking at the lives and experiences of female peasants in eighteenth-century France, mostly to the light of market activities, I highlight the discrepancy between theory—i.e., the written rules, the custom and even the ancient tradition that supported patriarchy—and new social practices and norms that challenged it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018. p. 10-28
Keywords [en]
patriarchy, women, gender, women's history, economic history, authority, household politics
National Category
History Gender Studies
Research subject
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150250ISBN: 9781138731547 (print)ISBN: 9781315188966 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-150250DiVA, id: diva2:1235548
Funder
Riksbankens JubileumsfondAvailable from: 2018-07-26 Created: 2018-07-26 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf