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Elite women athletes with superior knee function present similar dynamic knee stability, although different movement strategies, when compared to controls
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6339-9544
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0366-4609
2018 (English)In: 23rd annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science: Sport Science at the cutting edge, Dublin, Ireland, July 4-7, 2018: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Murphy, M.H., Boreham, C.A.G., De Vito, G., Tsolakidis, E., European College of Sport Sciences , 2018, p. 555-555Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Neuromuscular training (NMT) of the lower limb is vital for athletes in learning correct movement technique to avoid risk of injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The NMT aims for improved knee control while maintaining dynamic knee stability (DKS; resistance to linear/angular accelerations) during knee-challenging tasks. Assessing DKS is commonly attempted by evaluating discrete values of kinematic and kinetic variables during one-leg hops, but these measures may not sufficiently capture knee dynamics. We aimed to evaluate if elite women athletes who regularly perform NMT have greater DKS and/or different landing technique than normally active women who do not perform NMT, and if there are any correlations of DKS to peak knee extensor or flexor strength.

METHODS: A motion capture system (Qualisys) synchronized with two force plates (Kistler) registered hip and knee 3D joint angles and moments during one-leg standardized lateral side hop landings for 39 women (19 athletes, 20 controls). Ten trials were performed for the dominant leg with hands behind their back holding a rope (25 cm), deemed successful following 3 s of single leg stance after landing without putting the contralateral foot on the ground or making major adjustments with the ipsilateral foot. DKS was evaluated using the inclination angle of the knee’s helical axis relative to the flexion-extension axis calculated for rotation intervals of 10 degrees, as has been proven useful (Grip and Häger, 2013), to quantify how much knee joint motion deviated from pure flexion-extension at landing. Hip and knee joint angles were analysed at initial contact (IC), and peak angles and peak moments were analysed during the deceleration phase of landing from IC to peak knee flexion (ind. t-tests, p < 0.05).

RESULTS: Athletes had more successful hops, faster task execution, greater knee extension strength, greater hip flexion angle at IC, and higher peak moments of hip adduction and knee flexion than controls. There were however, no group differences in DKS or any significant correlations between DKS and knee extensor or flexor strength for any of the groups (r < absolute values of 0.41).

CONCLUSION: Elite women athletes that perform NMT on a regular basis had superior knee function but similar DKS to controls when performing a sport-specific one-leg side hop maneuver. The greater hip flexion at IC for athletes shows a different movement strategy for landing preparation. Potential benefits of NMT in sports contexts, e.g. less ACL injuries (Sugimoto et al., 2016), may be due to movement alterations of the hip to increase landing control to avoid positions that strain the ACL rather than improving DKS. Further emphasis on knee-specific landing control may be important to also improve DKS, which seems unrelated to strength.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European College of Sport Sciences , 2018. p. 555-555
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150557ISBN: 978-3-9818414-1-1 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-150557DiVA, id: diva2:1238177
Conference
23rd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science (ECSS), Dublin, Ireland, July 4-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2020-03-04Bibliographically approved

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Markström, JonasGrip, HelenaSchelin, LinaHäger, Charlotte

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CiteExportLink to record
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