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Diet as a moderator in the association of sedentary behaviors with inflammatory biomarkers among adolescents in the HELENA study
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 2051-2065Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To assess if a healthy diet might attenuate the positive sedentary-inflammation relation, whereas an unhealthy diet may increase the effect of sedentary behaviors on inflammatory biomarkers.

METHODS: In 618 adolescents (13-17 years) of the European HELENA study, data were available on body composition, a set of inflammation markers, and food intake assessed by a self-administered computerized 24 h dietary recall for 2 days. A 9-point Mediterranean diet score and an antioxidant-rich diet z-score were used as dietary indices and tested as moderators. A set of low-grade inflammatory characteristics was used as outcome: several cytokines in an inflammatory ratio (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, TGFβ-1), C-reactive protein, three cell-adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, sE-selectin), three cardiovascular risk markers (GGT, ALT, homocysteine) and three immune cell types (white blood cells, lymphocytes, CD3). Sedentary behaviors were self-reported and analyzed as total screen time. Multiple linear regression analyses tested moderation by diet in the sedentary behaviors-inflammation association adjusted for age, sex, country, adiposity (sum of six skinfolds), parental education, and socio-economic status.

RESULTS: Both diet scores, Mediterranean and antioxidant-rich diet, were significant protective moderators in the effect of sedentary behaviors on alanine-transaminase enzyme (P = 0.014; P = 0.027), and on the pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine ratio (P = 0.001; P = 0.004), but not on other inflammatory parameters.

CONCLUSION: A higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet or an antioxidant-rich diet may attenuate the onset of oxidative stress signs associated by sedentary behaviors, whereas a poor diet seems to increase inflammation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 58, no 5, p. 2051-2065
Keywords [en]
Adolescents, HELENA study, Low-grade inflammation, Mediterranean diet, Moderation, Sedentary behavior
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151272DOI: 10.1007/s00394-018-1764-4ISI: 000476492800027PubMedID: 29974229OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-151272DiVA, id: diva2:1243420
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved

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Forsner, Maria

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