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Education system stratification and health complaints among school-aged children
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0199-0435
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3749-998x
2019 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 220, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research shows that the school environment is an important social determinant of health among children and adolescents. However, we know virtually nothing of the health consequences of national education systems and policies, for example the stratification of pupils by academic ability. This study aimed to investigate if education system stratification is related to self-reported psychological and somatic health complaints of pupils aged 11 to 15, and social inequalities in such health complaints.

Survey data from the Health Behaviors of School-aged Children (HBSC) survey, covering 33 countries and more than 180 000 pupils in primary and lower secondary school, were used. Multilevel models showed that education system stratification was not associated with the average levels of health complaints of pupils, but cross-level interaction effects showed that stratification moderated the relationship between social background and health complaints, such that inequalities in health complaints were smaller in countries with more stratified systems. Moreover, this moderating effect was mediated by the school learning environmentand social relations in school. Specifically, social inequalities in school pressure, academic self-concept, school climate, and school satisfaction were smaller in more stratified education systems, which in turn accounted for smaller inequalities in health complaints in these countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 220, p. 159-166
Keywords [en]
Health complaints, Health inequalities, Education systems, Schools Children, Adolescents, Multilevel, Comparative research
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155320DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.11.007ISI: 000456222400017PubMedID: 30445341OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-155320DiVA, id: diva2:1278056
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00048Swedish Research Council, 2018-03870_3Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved

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Högberg, BjörnStrandh, MattiasPetersen, SolveigJohansson, Klara

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Högberg, BjörnStrandh, MattiasPetersen, SolveigJohansson, Klara
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Department of Social WorkDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine
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Social Science and Medicine
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologySocial Work

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