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Thiamin (vitamin B1) content in phytoplankton and zooplankton in the presence of filamentous cyanobacteria
(EcoChange)
(EcoChange)
(EcoChange)
(EcoChange)
2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 2423-2435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Top predators in several aquatic food webs regularly display elevated reproductive failure, caused by thiamin(vitamin B1)deficiency. The reasons for these low-thiamin levels are not understood and information about the transfer of thiamin from the producers (bacteria and phytoplankton) to higher trophic levels is limited. One main concern is whether cyanobacterial blooms could negatively affect thiamin transfer in aquatic systems. Laboratory experiments with Baltic Sea plankton communities and single phytoplankton species were used to study the effect of filamentous cyanobacteria on the transfer of thiamin from phytoplankton to zooplankton. Experiments showed that the thiamin content in copepods was reduced when exposed to elevated levels of cyanobacteria, although filamentous cyanobacteria had higher levels of thiamin than any other analyzed phytoplankton species. Filamentous cyanobacteria also had a negative effect on copepod egg production despite high concentrations of non-cyanobacterial food. Phytoplankton species composition affected overall thiamin concentration with relatively more thiamin available for transfer when the relative abundance of Dinophyceae was higher. Finally, phytoplankton thiamin levels were lower when copepods were abundant, indicating that grazers affect thiamin levels in phytoplankton community, likely by selective feeding. Overall, high levels of thiamin in phytoplankton communities are not reflected in the copepod community. We conclude that presence of filamentous cyanobacteria during summer potentially reduces the transfer of thiamin to higher trophic levels by negatively affecting phytoplankton and copepod thiamin content as well as copepod reproduction, thereby lowering the absolute capacity of the food web to transfer thiamin through copepods to higher trophic levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons , 2018. Vol. 63, no 6, p. 2423-2435
Keywords [en]
Acartia sp., Baltic Sea, community composition, trophic transfer, micronutrient, copepod, Ecology, Ekologi
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155580DOI: 10.1002/lno.10949OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-155580DiVA, id: diva2:1281759
Conference
2018-08-17T08:10:00.060+02:00
Note

article; 2018-12-06T10:27:49.229+01:00

Available from: 2019-01-23 Created: 2019-01-23 Last updated: 2019-01-23

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