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A 10-year review found increasing incidence trends of emergency egg allergy reactions and food-induced anaphylaxis in children
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 314-320Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: International reports have suggested that food allergies and food‐induced anaphylaxis have increased in children. We investigated the incidence of emergency food reactions over a 10‐year period.

Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children presenting to Umeå University hospital, Sweden, with an emergency food reaction from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2015. Cases were identified using discharge codes for allergies and anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis cases were included if they fulfilled the international criteria.

Results: We found emergency food allergy reactions in 519 children (58% boys) from 2006–2015 at a median age of 1.3 years. One‐third were hospitalised (32%) including 71/99 cases of anaphylaxis. Milk and eggs were the most commonly identified triggers. Emergency reactions to eggs increased during the study period with a Spearman rank correlation coefficient of 0.770 (p < 0.01) and the figures for anaphylaxis were 0.745 (p = 0.013). The incidence of food‐induced anaphylaxis increased and was 30 per 100 000 person‐years for the study period.

Conclusion: Most of the emergency reactions, treated by secondary care paediatricians and emergency physicians, were to milk and eggs. Allergic reactions to eggs increased from 2006 to 2015, as did food‐related anaphylaxis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019. Vol. 108, no 2, p. 314-320
Keywords [en]
Anaphylaxis, Children, Eggs, Emergency admissions, Food allergies
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155953DOI: 10.1111/apa.14464ISI: 000455518600021PubMedID: 29920760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-155953DiVA, id: diva2:1286913
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved

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Winberg, Anna

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CiteExportLink to record
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