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Occupational stress is associated with major long-term weight gain in a Swedish population-based cohort
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9227-8434
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 569-576Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Occupational stress and obesity are both increasing in prevalence, but prospective findings relating these conditions are inconsistent. We investigated if baseline as well as prolonged exposure to high job demands and low decision latitude were associated with major weight gain (≥ 10% of baseline weight) in 3872 Swedish women and men examined three times over 20 years in the population-based Västerbotten Intervention Program.

Methods: Anthropometry was measured and participants completed questionnaires on job strain, diet, and other lifestyle factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for confounders.

Results: Adjusting for age, baseline low decision latitude was associated with major weight gain over 10- and 20-year OR (95% CI) 1.16 (1.00–1.33) and 1.29 (1.13–1.47), respectively (both sexes combined). After adjustment for diet quality and other confounders, the effect over 20 years remained 1.30 (1.13–1.50). Sex modified the effect of prolonged exposure to high job demands over at least 10 years (interaction p = 0.02), showing that high job demands was a risk factor of major weight gain over 20 years in women [1.54 (1.14–2.07)], but not in men [0.87 (0.63–1.19)]. Neither diet nor other lifestyle factors explained these associations.

Conclusions: In conclusion, low decision latitude predicted major weight gain in women and men. In women, the results suggest an additional contribution to major weight gain from high job demands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019. Vol. 92, no 4, p. 569-576
Keywords [en]
Job strain, Work stress, Job demand, Decision latitude, Weight gain, Weight change, Prospective study
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158065DOI: 10.1007/s00420-018-1392-6ISI: 000462612100011PubMedID: 30523396OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158065DiVA, id: diva2:1305030
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006-1506Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilWallenberg FoundationsVästerbotten County CouncilAvailable from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, IngegerdLindahl, Bernt

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