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Associations between job satisfaction, person-centredness, and ethically difficult situations in nursing homes: A cross-sectional study
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8787-2327
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 75, no 5, p. 979-988Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To explore the associations between job satisfaction and perceived person-centredness and ethically difficult situations among staff in nursing homes (NHs).

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that person-centredness and few ethically difficult situations can contribute positively to NH staff's job satisfaction. However, empirical evidence of these associations is lacking.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey design.

METHOD: Nursing home staff (N = 341) in six NHs in Australia, Norway, and Sweden completed the questionnaire measuring job satisfaction, person-centredness, and ethically difficult situations. Data were collected between April - June 2016. Univariate analysis was used to describe the sample, one-way analysis of variance examined differences between variables. Bivariate correlation tested the relationships between variables and hierarchical multiple regression explored the extent to which person-centredness and ethically difficult situations could explain job satisfaction among staff.

RESULTS: After controlling for socio-demographic variables in a regression model, three variables of person-centredness and "ethically difficult situations" were significantly associated with job satisfaction. A "climate of community" contributed the most, followed by the "amount of organizational and environmental support," "a climate of everydayness," and few "ethically difficult situations."

CONCLUSION: The results support the theoretical foundation and previous findings suggesting that establishing NHs organizations based on person-centredness will increase staff job satisfaction. However, this is a cross-sectional study and the causality may go in both directions and should be further explored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019. Vol. 75, no 5, p. 979-988
Keywords [en]
cross-sectional study, ethical difficult situations, nursing home staff, person-centred care, person-centred climate
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158317DOI: 10.1111/jan.13890ISI: 000465107000007PubMedID: 30375019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158317DiVA, id: diva2:1306321
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Edvardsson, DavidSjögren, KarinLood, QarinSandman, Per-Olof

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