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Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. (EcoChange)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7469-0532
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). (EcoChange)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7819-9038
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). (EcoChange)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1298-3839
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4799-7381
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, p. 881-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine macroalgae are used worldwide for human consumption, animal feed, cosmetics and agriculture. In addition to beneficial nutrients, macroalgae contain halogenated natural products (HNPs), some of which have toxic properties similar to those of well-known anthropogenic contaminants. Sixteen species of red, green and brown macroalgae were collected in 2017–2018 from coastal waters of the northern Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic and Norway Atlantic, and analyzed for bromoanisoles (BAs) and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (MeO-BDEs). Target compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-LRMS), with qualitative confirmation in selected species by GC-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Quantified compounds were 2,4-diBA, 2,4,6-triBA, 2′-MeO-BDE68, 6-MeO-BDE47, and two tribromo-MeO-BDEs and one tetrabromo-MeO-BDE with unknown bromine substituent positions. Semiquantitative results for pentabromo-MeO-BDEs were also obtained for a few species by GC-HRMS. Three extraction methods were compared; soaking in methanol, soaking in methanol–dichloromethane, and blending with mixed solvents. Extraction yields of BAs did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) with the three methods and the two soaking methods gave equivalent yields of MeO-BDEs. Extraction efficiencies of MeO-BDEs were significantly lower using the blend method (p < 0.05). For reasons of simplicity and efficiency, the soaking methods are preferred. Concentrations varied by orders of magnitude among species: ∑2BAs 57 to 57 700 and ∑5MeO-BDEs < 10 to 476 pg g−1 wet weight (ww). Macroalgae standing out with ∑2BAs >1000 pg g−1 ww were Ascophyllum nodosumCeramium tenuicorneCeramium virgatumFucus radicansFucus serratusFucus vesiculosusSaccharina latissimaLaminaria digitata, and Acrosiphonia/Spongomorpha sp. Species A. nodosumC. tenuicorneChara virgataF. radicans and F. vesiculosus (Sweden Atlantic only) had ∑5MeO-BDEs >100 pg g−1ww. Profiles of individual compounds showed distinct differences among species and locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019. p. 881-892
Keywords [en]
bromoanisoles, methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers, halogenated natural products, macroalgae, Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic, Norway Atlantic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158517DOI: 10.1039/C9EM00042AISI: 000468787800009PubMedID: 31032511OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-158517DiVA, id: diva2:1307946
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGEAvailable from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Bidleman, Terry F.Andersson, AgnetaBrugel, SoniaEricson, LarsHaglund, PeterKupryianchyk, DaryaLau, Danny C. P.Liljelind, PerLundin, LisaTysklind, Mats

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Bidleman, Terry F.Andersson, AgnetaBrugel, SoniaEricson, LarsHaglund, PeterKupryianchyk, DaryaLau, Danny C. P.Liljelind, PerLundin, LisaTysklind, AndersTysklind, Mats
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Department of ChemistryDepartment of Ecology and Environmental SciencesUmeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF)
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