umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
An integrated approach to processing WHO-2016 verbal autopsy data: the InterVA-5 model
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Institute of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK; Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study (STIAS), Wallenberg Research Centre at Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 17, article id 102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Verbal autopsy is an increasingly important methodology for assigning causes to otherwise uncertified deaths, which amount to around 50% of global mortality and cause much uncertainty for health planning. The World Health Organization sets international standards for the structure of verbal autopsy interviews and for cause categories that can reasonably be derived from verbal autopsy data. In addition, computer models are needed to efficiently process large quantities of verbal autopsy interviews to assign causes of death in a standardised manner. Here, we present the InterVA-5 model, developed to align with the WHO-2016 verbal autopsy standard. This is a harmonising model that can process input data from WHO-2016, as well as earlier WHO-2012 and Tariff-2 formats, to generate standardised cause-specific mortality profiles for diverse contexts.

The software development involved building on the earlier InterVA-4 model, and the expanded knowledge base required for InterVA-5 was informed by analyses from a training dataset drawn from the Population Health Metrics Research Collaboration verbal autopsy reference dataset, as well as expert input.

Results: The new model was evaluated against a test dataset of 6130 cases from the Population Health Metrics Research Collaboration and 4009 cases from the Afghanistan National Mortality Survey dataset. Both of these sources contained around three quarters of the input items from the WHO-2016, WHO-2012 and Tariff-2 formats. Cause-specific mortality fractions across all applicable WHO cause categories were compared between causes assigned in participating tertiary hospitals and InterVA-5 in the test dataset, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.92 for children and 0.86 for adults.

The InterVA-5 model’s capacity to handle different input formats was evaluated in the Afghanistan dataset, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.97 and 0.96 between the WHO-2016 and the WHO-2012 format for children and adults respectively, and 0.92 and 0.87 between the WHO-2016 and the Tariff-2 format respectively.

Conclusions: Despite the inherent difficulties of determining “truth” in assigning cause of death, these findings suggest that the InterVA-5 model performs well and succeeds in harmonising across a range of input formats. As more primary data collected under WHO-2016 become available, it is likely that InterVA-5 will undergo minor re-versioning in the light of practical experience. The model is an important resource for measuring and evaluating cause-specific mortality globally.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019. Vol. 17, article id 102
Keywords [en]
Verbal autopsy, Mortality surveillance, Civil registration, InterVA, Cause of death, World Health Organization
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160291DOI: 10.1186/s12916-019-1333-6ISI: 000469778700001PubMedID: 31146736OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-160291DiVA, id: diva2:1325997
Available from: 2019-06-17 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1989 kB)43 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1989 kBChecksum SHA-512
c7a9e5f1d2ff77a332521ab7ef0b54a3a10d682c3ecea5cf9aa36fdd38ff51dcf70b4e66e01f1dc5908d3d819ef5ee406c129d7eb38f3d5fdd5d3bdf8ff10dc3
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Byass, PeterTollman, Stephen M.Kahn, Kathleen

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Byass, PeterTollman, Stephen M.Kahn, Kathleen
By organisation
Department of Epidemiology and Global Health
In the same journal
BMC Medicine
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 43 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 84 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf