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Food and Nutrient Intake during Pregnancy in Relation to Maternal Characteristics: Results from the NICE Birth Cohort in Northern Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1680Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Linkages between diet and other lifestyle factors may confound observational studies. We used cluster analysis to analyze how the intake of food and nutrients during pregnancy co-varies with lifestyle, clinical and demographic factors in 567 women who participated in the NICE (nutritional impact on immunological maturation during childhood in relation to the environment) birth-cohort in northern Sweden. A food frequency questionnaire, Meal-Q, was administered in pregnancy Week 34, and the reported food and nutrient intakes were related to maternal characteristics such as age, education, rural/town residence, parity, pre-pregnancy smoking, first-trimester BMI, allergy and hyperemesis. Two lifestyle-diet clusters were identified: (1) High level of education and higher age were related to one another, and associated with a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish, and (2) smoking before pregnancy and higher BMI in early pregnancy were related to one another and associated with a diet that contained white bread, French fries, pizza, meat, soft drinks, candy and snacks. More than half of the women had lower-than-recommended daily intake levels of vitamin D, folate, selenium, and iodine. Complex lifestyle-diet interactions should be considered in observational studies that link diet and pregnancy outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1680
Keywords [en]
nutrition, pregnancy, micronutrients, macronutrients, food intake, lifestyle, NICE study
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162682DOI: 10.3390/nu11071680ISI: 000478885400236PubMedID: 31336625OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-162682DiVA, id: diva2:1347003
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Sandin, Anna

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