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Evolutionary compaction and adaptation visualized by the structure of the dormant microsporidian ribosome
Laboratory of Protein and Nucleic Acid Chemistry, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA; Present address: Department of Molecular Biology, The Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research, Science for Life Laboratory, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2971-8190
2019 (English)In: Nature Microbiology, E-ISSN 2058-5276, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1798-1804Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microsporidia are eukaryotic parasites that infect essentially all animal species, including many of agricultural importance(1-3), and are significant opportunistic parasites of humane. They are characterized by having a specialized infection apparatus, an obligate intracellular lifestyles(5), rudimentary mitochondria and the smallest known eukaryotic genomess(5-7). Extreme genome compaction led to minimal gene sizes affecting even conserved ancient complexes such as the ribosomes(8-10). In the present study, the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the ribosome from the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented, which illustrates how genome compaction has resulted in the smallest known eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosome. Selection pressure led to the loss of two ribosomal proteins and removal of essentially all eukaryote-specific ribosomal RNA (rRNA) expansion segments, reducing the rRNA to a functionally conserved core. The structure highlights how one microsporidia-specific and several repurposed existing ribosomal proteins compensate for the extensive rRNA reduction. The microsporidian ribosome is kept in an inactive state by two previously uncharacterized dormancy factors that specifically target the functionally important E-site, P-site and polypeptide exit tunnel. The present study illustrates the distinct effects of evolutionary pressure on RNA and proteincoding genes, provides a mechanism for ribosome inhibition and can serve as a structural basis for the development of inhibitors against microsporidian parasites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019. Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1798-1804
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166484DOI: 10.1038/s41564-019-0514-6ISI: 000493113000007PubMedID: 31332387OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-166484DiVA, id: diva2:1382070
Funder
NIH (National Institute of Health), 1DP2GM123459Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved

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Barandun, Jonas

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