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The Persistence of High Levels of Living Alone Among Adults with Disabilities in Sweden, 1993–2011
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). DISLIFE.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7559-2571
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5471-9043
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2647-2869
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
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Number of Authors: 62020 (English)In: Population: Research and Policy Review, ISSN 0167-5923, E-ISSN 1573-7829Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study investigates how the probability to live alone has developed among working age individuals with and without disabilities in Sweden during the period 1993–2011 when extensive political reforms to improve the integration of disabled individuals in society were implemented. The results show that individuals with disabilities are approximately twice as likely to be living alone when compared to individuals without disabilities. People with disabilities were also more likely to report low life satisfaction, and this was especially true among individuals with disabilities living alone. Men and women with disabilities also tend to experience longer periods of living as a one-person household than non-disabled people. Over time we find no indications of reduced differences in family outcomes between disabled and non-disabled individuals but rather evidence to the contrary. These differences are interpreted as being the result of the disadvantage disabled individual’s experience in the partner market and that people with disabilities are less successful in forming partnerships that can lead to cohabitation and family formation. The results thus show how disabled individuals still face societal barriers that limit their possibilities to find and sustain relationships that result in stable cohabitation despite increased efforts to improve their inclusion in Swedish society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020.
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167923DOI: 10.1007/s11113-020-09570-2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-167923DiVA, id: diva2:1392102
Projects
DISLIFE
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125Available from: 2020-02-06 Created: 2020-02-06 Last updated: 2020-02-07

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Sandström, GlennNamatovu, FredinahIneland, JensLarsson, DanielNg, NawiStattin, Mikael

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Sandström, GlennNamatovu, FredinahIneland, JensLarsson, DanielNg, NawiStattin, Mikael
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Department of historical, philosophical and religious studiesCentre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR)Department of EducationDepartment of SociologyDepartment of Epidemiology and Global Health
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Population: Research and Policy Review
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)

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