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Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance features of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates from Pakistan
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8867-658X
Department of Microbiology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2991-8072
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2020 (English)In: Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials, ISSN 1476-0711, E-ISSN 1476-0711, Vol. 19, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen with a notorious reputation of being resistant to antimicrobial agents. The capability of A. baumannii to persist and disseminate between healthcare settings has raised a major concern worldwide.

Methods: Our study investigated the antibiotic resistance features and molecular epidemiology of 52 clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected in Pakistan between 2013 and 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar disc diffusion method. Comparative sequence analyses of the ampC and blaOXA-51-like alleles were used to assign the isolates into clusters. The whole genomes of 25 representative isolates were sequenced using the MiSeq Desktop Sequencer. Free online applications were used to determine the phylogeny of genomic sequences, retrieve the multilocus sequence types (ST), and detect acquired antimicrobial resistance genes.

Results: Overall, the isolates were grouped into 7 clusters and 3 sporadic isolates. The largest cluster, Ab-Pak-cluster-1 (blaOXA-66 and ISAba1-ampC-19) included 24 isolates, belonged to ST2 and International clone (IC) II, and was distributed between two geographical far-off cities, Lahore and Peshawar. Ab-Pak-clusters-2 (blaOXA-66, ISAba1-ampC-2), and -3 (blaOXA-66, ISAba1-ampC-20) and the individual isolate Ab-Pak-Lah-01 (ISAba1-blaOXA-66, ISAba1-ampC-2) were also assigned to ST2 and IC II. On the other hand, Ab-Pak-clusters-4 (blaOXA-69, ampC-1), -5 (blaOXA-69, ISAba1-ampC-78), and -6A (blaOXA-371, ISAba1-ampC-3) belonged to ST1, while Ab-Pak-cluster-6B (blaOXA-371, ISAba1-ampC-8) belonged to ST1106, with both ST1 and ST1106 being members of IC I. Five isolates belonged to Ab-Pak-cluster-7 (blaOXA-65, ampC-43). This cluster corresponded to ST158, showed a well-delineated position on the genomic phylogenetic tree, and was equipped with several antimicrobial resistance genes including blaOXA-23 and blaGES-11.

Conclusions: Our study detected the occurrence of 7 clusters of A. baumannii in Pakistan. Altogether, 6/7 of the clusters and 45/52 (86.5%) of the isolates belonged to IC I (n = 9) or II (n = 36), making Pakistan no exception to the global domination of these two clones. The onset of ST158 in Pakistan marked a geographical dispersal of this clone beyond the Middle East and brought up the need for a detailed characterization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020. Vol. 19, article id 2
Keywords [en]
Carbapenem-resistance, Strain typing, International clone, Phylogeny
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168832DOI: 10.1186/s12941-019-0344-7ISI: 000513637900001PubMedID: 31941492OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-168832DiVA, id: diva2:1415686
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03007Swedish Research Council, 2015-06824Swedish Research Council, 2018-02914Swedish Research Council, 2007-8673Swedish Research Council, 2016-06598The Kempe Foundations, JCK-1527The Kempe Foundations, JCK-1724Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved

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Karah, NabilWai, Sun NyuntUhlin, Bernt EricAhmad, Irfan

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