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Latitudinally structured variation in the temperature dependence of damselfly growth rates
Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
University of Leuven.
University of Leuven.
Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
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2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 16, nr 1, s. 64-71Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

The Metabolic Theory of Ecology predicts that the slope of the rate–temperature relationship, E, remains consistent across traits and organisms, acting as a major determinant of large-scale ecological patterns. Although E has recently been shown to vary systematically, we have a poor understanding of its ecological significance. To address this question, we conducted a common-garden experiment involving six damselfly species differing in distribution, estimating E at the level of full-sib families. Each species was sampled throughout its latitudinal range, allowing us to characterise variation in E along a latitudinal gradient spanning 3600 km. We show that E differs among populations and increases with latitude. E was right-skewness across species, but this was largely an artefact of the latitudinal trend. Increased seasonality towards higher latitude may contribute to the latitudinal trend in E. We conclude that E should be seen as a trait involved in local adaptation.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
2013. Vol. 16, nr 1, s. 64-71
Nyckelord [en]
environmental variation, growth rate, metabolic theory of ecology, thermal dependence, universal temperature dependence
Nationell ämneskategori
Miljövetenskap
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-62267DOI: 10.1111/ele.12013ISI: 000312301300008PubMedID: 23050790OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-62267DiVA, id: diva2:576927
Forskningsfinansiär
Forskningsrådet FormasTillgänglig från: 2012-12-14 Skapad: 2012-12-14 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-06-08Bibliografiskt granskad
Ingår i avhandling
1. Thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient in damselflies
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient in damselflies
2012 (Engelska)Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

Understanding how temperature affects biological systems is a central question in ecology and evolutionary biology. Anthropogenic climate change adds urgency to this topic, as the demise or success of species under climate change is expected to depend on how temperature affects important aspects of organismal performance, such as growth, development, survival and reproduction. Rates of biological processes generally increase with increasing temperature up to some maximal temperature. Variation in the slope of the initial, rising phase has attracted considerable interest and forms the focus of this thesis. I explore variation in growth rate-temperature relationships over several levels of biological organization, both between and within species, over individuals’ lifetime, depending on the ecological context and in relation to important life history characteristics such as generation length and winter dormancy.

      Specifically, I examine how a clade of temperate damselflies have adapted to their thermal environment along a 3,600 km long latitudinal transect spanning from Southern Spain to Northern Sweden. For each of six species, I sampled populations from close to the northern and southern range margin, as well from the center of the latitudinal range. I reared larvae in the laboratory at several temperatures in order to measure indiviudal growth rates. Very few studies of thermal adaptation have employed such an extensive sampling approach, and my finding reveal variation in temperature responses at several levels of organization.

      My main finding was that temperature responses became steeper with increasing latitude, both between species but also between latitudinal populations of the same species. Additional genetic studies revealed that this trend was maintained despite strong gene flow. I highlight the need to use more refined characterizations of latitudinal temperature clines in order to explain these findings. I also show that species differ in their ability to acclimate to novel conditions during ontogeny, and propose that this may reflect a cost-benefit trade-off driven by whether seasonal transitions occur rapidly or gradually during ontogeny.

      I also carried out a microcosm experiment, where two of the six species were reared either separately or together, to determine the interacting effects of temperature and competition on larval growth rates and population size structure. The results revealed that the effects of competition can be strong enough to completely overcome the rate-depressing effects of low temperatures. I also found that competition had stronger effects on the amount of variation in growth rates than on the average value.

      In summary, my thesis offers several novel insights into how temperature affects biological systems, from individuals to populations and across species’ ranges. I also show how it is possible to refine our hypotheses about thermal adaptation by considering the interacting effects of ecology, life history and environmental variation.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2012. s. 35
Nyckelord
Growth rate, metabolic theory of ecology, universal temperature dependence, environmental gradients, thermal performance, thermal sensitivity, environmental variability, optimality theory, life history, acclimation, size structure, competition, cannibalism, intraguild predation
Nationell ämneskategori
Ekologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-62276 (URN)978-91-7459-529-1 (ISBN)
Disputation
2013-01-18, N450, Umeå Universitet, Johan Bures väg 14, Umeå, 13:00 (Engelska)
Opponent
Handledare
Forskningsfinansiär
Forskningsrådet Formas
Tillgänglig från: 2012-12-21 Skapad: 2012-12-14 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-06-08Bibliografiskt granskad

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Nilsson-Örtman, ViktorJohansson, Frank

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