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Neurosensory findings among electricians with self-reported remaining symptoms after an electrical injury: A case series
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
2016 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 8, 1712-1720 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Symptoms described in previous studies indicate that electrical injury can cause longstanding injuries to the neurosensory nerves. The aim of the present case series was to objectively assess the profile of neurosensory dysfunction in electricians in relation to high voltage or low voltage electrical injury and the "no-let-go phenomenon".

METHODS: Twenty-three Swedish male electricians exposed to electrical injury were studied by using a battery of clinical instruments, including quantitative sensory testing (QST). The clinical test followed a predetermined order of assessments: thermal perceptions thresholds, vibration perception thresholds, tactile gnosis (the Shape and Texture Identification test), manual dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test), and grip strength. In addition, pain was studied by means of a questionnaire, and a colour chart was used for estimation of white fingers.

RESULTS: The main findings in the present case series were reduced thermal perceptions thresholds, where half of the group showed abnormal values for warm thermal perception and/or cold thermal perception. Also, the tactile gnosis and manual dexterity were reduced. High voltage injury was associated with more reduced sensibility compared to those with low voltage.

CONCLUSION: Neurosensory injury can be objectively assessed after an electrical injury by using QST with thermal perception thresholds. The findings are consistent with injuries to small nerve fibres. In the clinical setting thermal perception threshold is therefore recommended, in addition to tests of tactile gnosis and manual dexterity (Purdue Pegboard).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 42, no 8, 1712-1720 p.
Keyword [en]
Manual dexterity, Small fibre neuropathy, Tactile gnosis, Thermal perception, Vibration perception thresholds, Voltage
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128129DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2016.05.017ISI: 000391073900012PubMedID: 27317339Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85005942729OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-128129DiVA: diva2:1049253
Available from: 2016-11-24 Created: 2016-11-24 Last updated: 2017-08-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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