umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sodium supply influences plasma sodium concentration and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia in extremely preterm infants
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4649-0653
Uppsala universitet.
Uppsala universitet.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 81, 455-460 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hyper- and hyponatremia occur frequently in extremely preterm infants. Our purpose was to investigate plasma sodium (P-Na) concentrations, the incidence of hyper and hyponatremia, and the impact of possible predisposing factors in extremely preterm infants.

Methods: In this observational study, we analyzed data from the EXtremely PREterm (< 27 wk.) infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS, n = 707). Detailed nutritional, laboratory, and weight data were collected retrospectively from patient records.

Results: Mean ± SD P-Na increased from 135.5 ± 3.0 at birth to 144.3 ± 6.1 mmol/l at a postnatal age of 3 d and decreased thereafter. Fifty percent of infants had hypernatremia (P-Na >145 mmol/l) during the first week of life while 79% displayed hyponatremia (P-Na < 135 mmol/l) during week 2. Initially, the main sodium sources were blood products and saline injections/infusions, gradually shifting to parenteral and enteral nutrition towards the end of the first week. The major determinant of P-Na and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia was sodium supply. Fluid volume provision was associated with postnatal weight change but not with P-Na.

Conclusion: The supply of sodium, rather than fluid volume, is the major factor determining P-Na concentrations and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017. Vol. 81, 455-460 p.
National Category
Pediatrics
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128245DOI: 10.1038/pr.2016.264ISI: 000396297000016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-128245DiVA: diva2:1051014
Available from: 2016-11-30 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2017-05-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Späth, CorneliaStoltz Sjöström, ElisabethDomellöf, Magnus
By organisation
PaediatricsDepartment of Food and Nutrition
In the same journal
Pediatric Research
Pediatrics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 79 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf