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Solidarity at the needle point: the intersection of compassion and containment during the A(H1N1) pandemic in Sweden 2009
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
2016 (English)In: Sociology and Anthropology, ISSN 2331-6179, Vol. 4, no 12, 1108-1116 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the start of the A(H1N1) pandemic 2009, the WHO talked of the pandemic as an extreme expression of the global need for solidarity, and vaccination as the preferred national response. While seasonal vaccination mostly is framed as an individual benefit, the pandemic mass-vaccination in Sweden was framed in terms of solidarity. In the context of public health in Sweden, solidarity has worked as a rational evidence-based argument for politicians as proof of a reflexive and confident welfare nation. Solidarity was also perceived as an emotion that was possible to enact in bodily practice and would serve the goal of reaching herd immunity for the population. In this article these "politico-somatic" aspects of the pandemic preparedness and response are examined through qualitative methods such as ethnological interviews and fieldwork. The article discusses the entangled articulations of compassion and containment during the pandemic and how the side effect of narcolepsy from the vaccine Pandemrix disrupted the interpretations of solidarity as a relational concept. For the future, it is important to learn the lessons from the pandemic response, including how the issue of the side effect will influence coming preparedness and how the forces of compassion and containment will work. As long as it is not ignored, this side effect can enable the possibility to create strengthened reflexive awareness, which in turn strengthens public trust regarding possible future interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Horizon Research Publishing Corporation , 2016. Vol. 4, no 12, 1108-1116 p.
Keyword [en]
A(H1N1) Pandemic, Side Effect, Narcolepsy, Vaccination, Compassion, Containment
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Ethnology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128600DOI: DOI: 10.13189/sa.2016.041210OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-128600DiVA: diva2:1053025
Projects
Epidemics, Vaccination and the Power of Narratives
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-03-28Bibliographically approved

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Lundgren, Britta
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Department of culture and media studies
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf