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Creating a Sense of Unity: From Quantified Self to Qualitative Space
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7089-202X
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
2016 (English)In: Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction: Methods, Techniques, and Best Practices / [ed] Margherita Antona, Constantine Stephanidis, Springer, 2016, 371-381 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The design and usage of Personal Informatics (PI) systems have been subjects of rapidly growing interest in recent years. PI systems are typically designed to monitor individuals' physical activity and encourage them to be more active, thereby 'hacking' the habit of prolonged sitting. Most PI systems focus solely on collecting quantitative data to encourage self-reflection and are therefore sometimes discussed in terms of the Quantified Self movement. However, this perspective is wholly focused on individual bodily movements and neglects the role of architectural spaces. This paper discusses an ongoing project focused on PI systems design at the intersection of bodily movements and the office as an architectural space. Taking this as a point of departure, we introduce a simple prototype interactive lamp known as the NEAT lamp, which was designed, implemented and evaluated in relation to everyday office work. The rationale underpinning the prototype's design is presented, followed by the results of a real-world evaluation of its effects in practice. We also discuss the role of the NEAT lamp as an ambient light that promotes awareness of sedentary behavior in the office as an open architectural space. Finally, we highlight the role of ambient displays as a medium for creating a sense of unity between the self and the architectural space, and propose that this observation suggests that we should move the discussion away from "quantified selves" towards qualitative spaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016. 371-381 p.
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 9737
Keyword [en]
Personal informatics, Design Notification systems, Ambient light, Architectural space
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128687DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-40250-5_36ISI: 000389459800036ISBN: 978-3-319-40249-9 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-40250-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-128687DiVA: diva2:1055396
Conference
10th International Conference, UAHCI 2016, Held as Part of HCI International 2016, Toronto, ON, Canada, July 17-22, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-12 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Working out work: from personal informatics to redesigning work
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working out work: from personal informatics to redesigning work
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Vardagsmotion i arbetslivet : från personliga IT-stöd för träning till omstrukturering av arbete
Abstract [en]

"Personal Informatics" (PI) and "Quantified Self" (QS) are two contemporary notions in the field of Human–Computer Interaction. Such hardware and software systems gather personalized quantified data and visualize them for the purpose of supporting self-reflection. Many of these systems focus on breaking the habit of prolonged sitting and increasing physical activity in our daily lives. The problems associated with the sedentary lifestyle and prolonged hours of sitting have been noted in many studies. In fact, stationary behavior is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and certain types of type of cancer. Nowadays we, as adults, spend more than 8 hours a day on work and work-related activities. As a consequence, the time spent sitting in office workspaces contributes to the majority of stationary behavior in our daily lives. Throughout history, designers and technocrats have constantly redesigned workspaces in attempts to increase work productivity and efficiency. Thus "modern" office work configuration includes desks and stationary computers and so office workers have become accustomed to prolonged sitting in their workplaces.    

In relation to this research problem, I have worked on my PhD thesis within the context of a four-year cross disciplinary research project in which we have been exploring ways of increasing physical activity and breaking the habit of prolonged sitting among office workers. This is a thesis in informatics and closely allied to medicine and it focuses on studying how contemporary office work affects the body and how to redesign this context. For this thesis, I conducted three empirical studies and designed and developed two prototypes - the "NEAT Lamp" and the "Talking Tree". The "Sport Co." study was the first quantitative study, and was followed by two qualitative observational ethnographic studies – the "Housing Co." study and the "Health Co." study. The research process adopted during the work can be described as an intertwined process consisting of three methodological approaches: observational ethnographic studies, concept development and prototyping. These three came together to form a coherent contextual design process for tackling the research question, "How can we approach the design of work in today's offices in order to make office workers more physically active in their workspaces?"  This process resulted in five papers presenting various aspects and results of the research conducted. The results cover the role of bodies at work by considering the history of work design, knowledge about the local movement and mobility patterns of office workers in modern office spaces and eventually the design and evaluation of the two prototypes introduced in this thesis. Finally, I conclude this thesis by highlighting my overall contributions. The first contribution targets designers willing to design for increasing physical activity and breaking the habit of prolonged sitting in workspaces. In relation to this I introduce a design space as a tool for understanding the design of work in relation to worker’s bodies. The second contribution highlights how observational ethnographic studies, concept development, and prototyping can be combined when exploring the context of physical activity in office environments and it shows how contextual design might be a suitable approach for such studies. In addition, it emphasizes ways for how we can redesign work and expand our contextual knowledge. This, by examining and evaluating interactive prototypes in real office settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2016. 108 p.
Series
Research reports in informatics, ISSN 1401-4572 ; 17.01
Keyword
Personal Informatics, Quantified Self, Redesigning Work, Contextual Design, Observational Ethnographic Studies, Concept Development, Prototyping, Design Space
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128703 (URN)978-91-7601-628-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-01-20, MA121, MIT-huset, Umeå University, Umeå, 12:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-12 Last updated: 2017-01-24Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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